maximum freedom

“Those anarchists who call themselves communists (and I am one of them) do so not because they wish to impose their particular way of seeing things on others or because they believe that outside communism there can be no salvation, but because they are convinced, until proved wrong, that the more human beings are joined in brotherhood, and the more closely they co-operate in their efforts for the benefit of all concerned, the greater is the well-being and freedom which each can enjoy. They believe that Man, even if freed from oppression by his fellow men, still remains exposed to the hostile forces of Nature, which he cannot overcome alone, but which, in association with others, can be harnessed and transformed into the means for his own well being. The man who would wish to provide for his material needs by working alone is a slave to his work, as well as not being always sure of producing enough to keep alive. It would be fantastic to think that some anarchists, who call themselves, and indeed are, communists, should desire to live as in a convent, subjected to common rules, uniform meals and clothes, etc.; but it would be equally absurd to think that they should want to do just as they like without taking into account the needs of others or of the right all have to equal freedom. Everybody knows that Kropotkin, for instance, who was one of the most active and eloquent anarchist propagandists of the communist idea was at the same time a staunch defender of the independence of the individual, and passionately desired that everybody should be able to develop and satisfy freely their artistic talents, engage in scientific research, and succeed in establishing a harmonious unity between manual and intellectual activity in order to become human beings in the noblest sense of the word. Furthermore communist-anarchists believe that because of the natural differences in fertility, salubrity and location of the land masses, it would be impossible to ensure equal working conditions for everybody individually and so achieve, if not solidarity, at least, justice. But at the same time they are aware of the immense difficulties in the way of putting into practice that world-wide, free-communism, which they look upon as the ultimate objective of a humanity emancipated and united, without a long period of free development. And for this reason they arrive at conclusions which could be perhaps expressed in the following formula:
The achievement of the greatest measure of individualism is in direct ration to the amount of communism that is possible; that is to say, a maximum of solidarity in order to enjoy a maximum of freedom.”
- Errico Malatesta, on ‘Anarchist-Communism’

Yokohama Masterplan
From the outside, the Japanese city seems a mere coexistence of random architectures in a field of maximum freedom. There is no planning, no public realm. But Yokohama deviates from the Japanese norm; through its commitment to urban design it could become a laboratory for defining a “Japanese” public realm. The point of departure for the project was the unique conditions we found on the site: two markets with a colossal number of parking places; the arrival on the site of railroads, cars (via the new highway) and ships, and the proximity of the imminent massive development of Minato Mirai 21 – a tremendous injection of density in an already congested urban condition. (OMA)

The legitimate functions of government are actually conducive to freedom. Maintaining internal order, keeping foreign foes at bay, administering justice, removing obstacles to the free interchange of goods—the exercise of these powers makes it possible for men to follow their chosen pursuits with maximum freedom. But note that the very instrument by which these desirable ends are achieved can be the instrument for achieving undesirable ends—that government can, instead of extending freedom, restrict freedom. 

                                                                                             - Barry Goldwater,                                                                          The Conscience of a Conservative

anonymous asked:

is it true that you have to be 100% committed to either the celtic or germanic side of asnac to get accepted?? like if i got in i'd like to study a mixture (probably welsh, brittonic history, old english, anglo-saxon history, insular latin & palaeography), would i be at a disadvantage?

you just described almost exactly my papers from first year! (scandi history rather than palaeography for me…) i’m literally taking old english, welsh and latin this year so yes, you absolutely can mix it up, especially in first year when the course is set up to give you maximum freedom to try things out

having a mixture of both is probably also going to be useful to you in third year if you take papers like law and lawlessness, or celtic sea-kings

MAKING TEA

One does not simply “make tea”; there is a procedure that is both practiced and recognized worldwide. Want to make an excellent cup of tea? Follow me, kids. 

Fresh water

The first rule is always to use fresh water – for the best flavor, the water should be well oxygenated, and the more times you boil the same water, the less oxygen it contains. If you want to be super fancy as fuck, filter the water before boiling or even better, use bottled water that gives the results you want (some have more minerals and salts than others and these come out in the flavor).

Amount

The most common rule of thumb is to use 1-2 teaspoons per 230 ml (8 oz) cup and adjust according to preference. Bulkier leaf teas will need a greater volume per serving than small, dense leaves. 

Brewing method

Loose leaves in a teapot or mug allow for maximum freedom for the leaves to unfurl, and a more flavorful cup. If the tea infuses for longer than its ideal time, it can become bitter (and we don’t want that, now, do we?). You can avoid this by using a basket filter (they come in cup and teapot sizes) or a tea “sock” or bag and removing the infused leaves mess-free and  quickly. Tea balls and mesh infusers do a similar job, but don’t allow the same degree of circulation and honestly, they’re a pain in the ass to use. The basket filter is what I use. 

Water temperature

Remember that tea leaves are just delicate plants and that your boiling water (100°C) (212 °F) actually scorches the tea. When tea leaves get scorched, they release a lot of tannins (which makes your tea bitter). Different kinds of teas need to be steeped at different temperatures. If you don’t have a fancy tea kettle, you can cool your water accordingly. 

TEA LEAVES

Now kids, I’m gonna put this simply… tea is a lot like weed (it’s picked, it’s oxidized, it’s rolled, it’s dried, it’s aged, and it makes you feel fucking great) 

Picking

Let’s start at the tree. The leaves you steep were most probably picked in Spring/Summer. These leaves were picked by hand by wonderful people out in a field somewhere that worked long hours to bring you that single cup of tea (thank them). When you steep a teabag, however, those were all machine picked.  

Wilting

After the leaves are picked, they start to wilt. The amount of time your leaves left to wilt changes the flavor. During that time, the leaves are left out in the sun. Green teas, however, are not left to wilt at all and they go straight to the factory. 

Bruising

After they’re wilted, the leaves are then put in a huge bamboo tray and they’re tossed. This activates enzymes in the leaves and gives them more flavor. 

Oxidation or fermentation

Not all teas are oxidized, but if they are, they are spread out in a climate-controlled environment for a certain amount of time (sometimes the leaves are also agitated), and the oxidation process will make the leaves darker. Oxidation has a big influence on the depth of taste and is an extremely important part of the process; it needs to be done perfectly. The oxidation process also explains why Black teas for example are much darker than Green teas. 

Fixing 

Oxidation needs to be stopped at the desired level for the type of tea, and this is achieved by steaming the leaves in a wok, which deactivates the oxidative enzymes.

Rolling 

Before the final drying, the tea leaves are rolled and formed by hand. Leaves can be rolled into spirals, kneaded and rolled into pellets, or in the case of some oolong teas, rolled into spheres or half spheres. 

Drying or firing

Leaves are stacked in hot-air rack dryers, or spread out and exposed to the natural heat of the sun. In this way the moisture content of the leaves is reduced and the leaves become “dry”. 

TYPES OF TEA

So, I know that feeling when you go into a tea shop and you’re like, “holy shit; there are so many different kinds of teas, what the fuck do I choose?” Well, my friends, I’m here so that you need never feel hopeless again.

Okay, so, usually the tins in the tea shops have colors on them (6 different colors). That’s because there are only 6 different kinds of teas that originate from the Camellia Sinensis “bush” or “plant”.

These 6 different kinds are: White, Green, Black, Yellow, Oolong, and Puerh.

WHITE TEA

Produced in: China

Tastes:

  • Sweet
  • Smooth
  • Soft
  • Clean

GREEN TEA

Produced in: China, Japan, India

Tastes:

  • Spicy
  • Mineral
  • Astringent
  • Fresh
  • Kelpy
  • Crisp
  • Herbaceous

BLACK TEA

Produced in: India, Sri Lanka, Kenya

Tastes:

  • Bold
  • Nutty
  • Smoky
  • Spicy
  • Biscuity
  • Malty
  • Aromatic
  • Coppery

YELLOW TEA

Produced in: China

Tastes:

  • Fresh
  • Smooth
  • Clean
  • Bright
  • Aromatic
  • Soft

OOLONG TEA

Produced in: China or Taiwan

Tastes:

  • Brisk
  • Earthy
  • Aromatic
  • Smooth
  • Sweet

PUERH TEA

Produced in: China

Tastes:

  • Brisk
  • Sweet
  • Earthy
  • Woodsy

I’ll keep adding to this when I think of more stuff, I hope you’ve taken something from this. Love you. <3 

You and I are told we must choose between a left or right, but I suggest there is no such thing as a left or right. There is only an up or down. Up to man’s age-old dream — the maximum of individual freedom consistent with order — or down to the ant heap of totalitarianism. Regardless of their sincerity, their humanitarian motives, those who would sacrifice freedom for security have embarked on this downward path. Plutarch warned, “The real destroyer of the liberties of the people is he who spreads among them bounties, donations and benefits.
—  Ronald Reagan