maurice-quentin-de-la-tour

Maurice Quentin de La Tour (1704-1788)
“Portrait of King Louis XV” (1748)
Pastel on gray-blue paper stuck on a canvas stretched on a chassis
Rococo
Located in the Musée du Louvre, Paris, France

Louis XV (1710-1774), known as Louis the Beloved (Louis le bien aimé), was a monarch of the House of Bourbon who ruled as King of France from 1 September 1715 until his death. He succeeded his great-grandfather Louis XIV at the age of five. Until he reached maturity in 1723, his kingdom was ruled by Philippe d'Orléans, Duke of Orléans as Regent of France; the duke was his maternal great-uncle, as well as first cousin twice removed patrilineally.

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Inspiration: baby blue menswear

This week I’ve posted a LOT of menswear (from the incredibly ugly Moschino collection to modern and antique embroidery and the perfect macaroni outfit), so let’s begin the weekend with this little selection of baby blue menswear very much in the mood of the pink menswear post.

Baby blue is a nice colour elegant and easy to the eye, is somehow discreet and offers a nice contrast with gold and yellow embelishments and a cold and similiar background to grey and silver.

And of course we must add that pastel colours rule.

Photos from top:

  • Still from the 2001 Swedish mini-series “The Marriage of Gustav III” (Gustav III:s äktenskap)
  • “Portrait of Jean Charles Garnier d’Isle”, Maurice Quentin de La Tour, ca. 1750
  • Three-piece suit made of silk with metallic-thread passementerie, French, ca. 1765
  • Porcelain blue waistcoat made in London with textile made by Peter Lekeux and designed by Anna Maria Garthwaite, brocaded with silver-gilt poliate and appiquéd with polychrome silk, 1747
  • Wool suit, British, ca. 1780
  • Waistcoat with same colour silk embroidery, made in China for the Western market, ca. 1740
  • Blue three-piece suit with golden embelishments, French, ca. 1725-1750 (detail and waistcoat)
  • “Portrait of a gentleman (maybe Armand Guillaume François de Gourges, Marquis of Vayres and d’Aulnay), Jean Valade, 1753
  • Three-piece suit of silk with moiré finish embroidered with sequins and metallic-thread, France, ca. 1760
  • “Portrait of Marie-Joseph Peyre”,  Marie-Suzanne Giroust, 1771
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18th Century : 9 Historical figures.

Voltaire, Jean Le Rond d'Alembert, Maurice Quentin de La Tour, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Denis Diderot, François Boucher, Jean-Philippe Rameau, Ange-Jacques Gabriel, Pierre-Augustin Caron de Beaumarchais.

Marie Josèphe of Saxony, Dauphine of France. Maurice Quentin de La Tour (French, 1704-1788). Pastel on canvas. Gemäldegalerie Alte Meister, Dresden.

Maria Josepha of Saxony (1731-1767) became Dauphine at the age of fifteen through her marriage to Louis de France, the son and heir of Louis XV. Marie Josèphe was the mother of three kings of France, including Louis XVI, who died under the guillotine during the French Revolution. Her youngest daughter, Madame Élisabeth, also was beheaded during the Revolution.