maud-oakes

The element of sacrifice and sacrament, of dismemberment or immolation, which is so common in all the myths of the dying and resurrecting gods whether as youths or maidens, is reflected in Inanna’s descent, by her willingness to make the sacrifice of the symbols of worldly power during six or seven stages into the place of death. She is ready to risk all for an uncertain return to life reborn. What is chiefly remarkable is that the myth of rebirth never fails; the ravished daughter or the dead son-lover is always resuscitated: Inanna, though “turned into a corpse” and “hung from a stake,” is always brought back to life.
— 

The Wisdom of the Serpent: The Myths of Death, Rebirth and Resurrection”, Joseph Henderson and Maud Oakes 

fantheon, this is your hourly reminder that Persephone and Inanna are probably fine.