master colonel

Jordan Anderson or Jourdon Anderson (1825 – 1907) was an African-American former slave noted for a letter he dictated, known as “Letter from a Freedman to His Old Master”

It was addressed to his former master, Colonel P. H. Anderson, in response to the Colonel’s request that Jordan return to the plantation to help restore the farm after the disarray of the war. It has been described as a rare example of documented “slave humor” of the period and its deadpan style has been compared to the satire of Mark Twain.

Dayton, Ohio, August 7, 1865

To my Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdan, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Col. Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here; I get $25 a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy (the folks here call her Mrs. Anderson), and the children, Milly Jane and Grundy, go to school and are learning well; the teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday-School, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated; sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks, but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Col. Anderson. Many darkies would have been proud, as I used to was, to call you master. Now, if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost- Marshal- General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you are sincerely disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years and Mandy twenty years. At $25 a month for me, and $2 a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to $11,680. Add to this the interest for the time our wages has been kept back and deduct what you paid for our clothing and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams Express, in care of V. Winters, esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night, but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the Negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve, and die if it comes to that, than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood, the great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

P.S.—Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant, Jourdan Anderson

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jordan_Anderson

7

Akira (1988) / Key Master Set-Up (C-1955, Book A-C) / 241mm x 350mm -

Tetsuo flies through the air, having been shot by the Colonel, as Kaori looks on in shock. In the near background we can see the throne on which sits Akira’s physical remains in a series of jars. In the distant background the Colonel can be seen, pistol in hand. In total, the piece comprises of 7 cels, 3 airbrushed partial layers and 1 hand painted background.

It is also the only piece in my collection that actually features the film’s title (In English, anyway), which is a nice touch.

2

[image: above two screencaps are full body screencaps of Lycaea from SWTOR. Lycaea is a purple togruta with a round face and gold jewerly, wearing a dark purple tunic and black armor on her thights that match her prosthetic legs. end image]

its lycaea’s new outfit, now that she’s in chapter 3 (lycaea gets prosthetic legs after her first encounter with draagh)

Now i’m doing my screencap dump post a little different. im just gonna transcribe the long conversations in which the pictures don’t matter straight, rather than posting screencaps of them and then writing the image descriptions underneath. i feel it’ll be more accessible and easier to read. individual lines will still be screencapped tho

Convo one, on Belsavis in the base, when you’re trying to find your target


Colonel Trill: The order came directly from Darth Baras, and you don’t have clearance to know more.

Lycaea: I’m not leaving until you tell me everything.

Captain Oklart: Colonel, what are you doing? We’re in the presence of a Sith Lord. It’s our duty to aid in any way.


Captain Oklart: Me? My lord, I … I figure the Sith run this Empire, so the rest of us are–well– fodder. We all know that.

Colonel Trill: Captian, are you telling this Sith to go out and kill fellow soldiers? That’s treason.

Colonel Trill: I’m reporting you both to High Command. Darth Baras will know what has transpired here.

So basically blah blah you get these guys. There’s one who is like “we’re fodder” which is kind of depressing but probably also accurate for how it feels to be caught in the sith hierarchy games

anyway lycaea killed colonel trill, which she wound up regretting when it became clear she couldn’t prevent baras from learning about her without killing like way way more people, and while she was willing to kill one person to prevent baras from knowing she survived, she wasn’t willing to kill a ton

[image: Lieutenant Kaid says “damn these Sith games.” end image]

and another guy who hates being caught up in the Sith backstabbing contest, unsurprisingly

when you meet master timms (keeping one screencap, because it might have been hard to believe without it

Master Timmns: I know you’re there. I can feel your presence. What’s more, I know who you are. Many years past, I was the Padawan of Master Nomen Karr. He and I forged a bond through the Force.  I know about your confrontation with Master Karr, and what you did to him.

Lycaea: I should have killed htat miserable old man when I had the chance

Master Timmns: He’s never been the same, and he no longer communes with the Force.

[image: screencap of the dialogue showing ‘I should’ve killed that miserable old man when i had the chance’ and jaesa approving. end image]

okay first thing, it had been so long since i played chapter 1 on this file i totally forgot i spared karr :P i assumed lycaea had killed him

second jaesa approves of you saying you sould’ve killed Karr. I wasn’t expecting that, so it was interesting to see.

last:

Lycaea: Tell me where Darth Ekkage’s cell is, and we can part ways.

Timmns: Sorry. I can’t be sure you won’t attack me once you know.

Lycaea: How do I know you’ll make good on your promise?

Timmns: Because it’s practical, and I am nothing if not practical.

Lycaea liked Timmns being practical :p even tho she was acting annoyed she was like “fine, Jedi, you’re all right”

if he hadn’t decided to keep the information secret and had just shared immediately like he trusted her, she would’ve liked it, but she wouldn’t have liked him as much

well this was a slightly different screencap format but i hope it was okay

i still got all my commentary out

Sitting at my table, having just finished a report and signed it “James A. Hamilton, Master in Chancery,” Colonel Troup, the early friend of my father, came into my office and taking out of his pocket book a paper in the form of a note, handed it to me without saying a word. I read it twice, and returned it to him together with the paper I had just written and signed. He compared the writing of the two papers and said, “I am satisfied it is a forgery.” According to Parton’s Life of Aaron Burr (page 616) the paper was in these words:

“Aaron Burr—Sir: Please to meet me with the weapon you choose, on the 15th May, where you murdered my father, at 10 o'clock, with your second. (Signed) James A. Hamilton. May 8th, 1819

I was very much excited and angered that Burr should dare to make any communication to me; and that Troup should, as his friend, have been the medium, and under the excitement I very foolishly replied, "Sir I am not satisfied—the note is, as you say, a forgery, but if you come here as the friend of Aaron Burr to accept the challenge if sent by me, I adopt it.” Troup replied, “Such was not my purpose. I did not come here believing you wrote the note. I will now return it to Mr. Burr.” He then took his leave with evident embarrassment. From the character of the writing, I believed it was the work of a weak and wicked man who well knew my hand-writing and was devoted to the corrupt faction, then the subject of attack in the newspaper, the American, of which I was an editor and in part a proprietor, and that it was done in the hope that I might be disgraced or destroyed. I related the circumstance to three discreet friends who agreed with me and thought it best at present not to say anything more about it, under the expectation that its author would report “that Hamilton had challenged Aaron Barr,"and that as this report might be traced, the author of the base fraud would be discovered.

— 

James Hamilton, Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton

Did I ever mention that one time one of Hamilton’s sons almost got into a duel with Aaron Burr?

ljblueteak  asked:

Hi! Do you know whether Burr really got a letter challenging him to a duel from one of Hamilton's son?

It wasn’t James Alexander who actually sent the note, but an unidentified prankster, but it almost resulted in an affair of honor:


“Sitting at my table, having just finished a report and signed it ‘James A. Hamilton, Master in Chancery,’ Colonel Troup, the early friend of my father, came into my office and taking out of his pocket book a paper in the form of a note, handed it to me without saying a word. I read it twice, and returned it to him together with the paper I had just written and signed. He compared the writing of the two papers and said, ‘I am satisfied it is a forgery.“ According to Parton’s Life of Aaron Burr (page 616) the paper was in these words:

‘Aaron Burr—Sir: Please to meet me with the weapon you choose, on the 15th May, where you murdered my father, at 10 o'clock, with your second.

(Signed) "James A. Hamilton.’

May 8th, 1819.

I was very much excited and angered that Burr should dare to make any communication to me; and that Troup should, as his friend, have been the medium, and under the excitement I very foolishly replied, ‘Sir I am not satisfied—the note is, as you say, a forgery, but if you come here as the friend of Aaron Burr to accept the challenge if sent by me, I adopt it.’ Troup replied, ‘Such was not my purpose. I did not come here believing you wrote the note. I will now return it to Mr. Burr.’ He then took his leave with evident embarrassment. From the character of the writing, I believed it was the work of a weak and wicked man who well knew my hand-writing and was devoted to the corrupt faction, then the subject of attack in the newspaper, the American, of which I was an editor and in part a proprietor, and that it was done in the hope that I might be disgraced or destroyed. I related the circumstance to three discreet friends who agreed with me and thought it best at present not to say anything more about it, under the expectation that its author would report ‘that Hamilton had challenged Aaron Burr,’ and that as this report might be traced, the author of the base fraud would be discovered.”

- Reminiscences of James A. Hamilton

I follow, like, five Canadian people, but it’s so interesting when I see them discussing/commenting on their political stuff.

Like I have no idea what’s happening, but apparently there’s something about a flag not being conservative or not wanting to be celebrated? And something to do with the war of 1812?

I’m so fascinated by you guys. Please tell me more of your culture and your ways.

Dayton, Ohio,

August 7, 1865

To My Old Master, Colonel P.H. Anderson, Big Spring, Tennessee

Sir: I got your letter, and was glad to find that you had not forgotten Jourdon, and that you wanted me to come back and live with you again, promising to do better for me than anybody else can. I have often felt uneasy about you. I thought the Yankees would have hung you long before this, for harboring Rebs they found at your house. I suppose they never heard about your going to Colonel Martin’s to kill the Union soldier that was left by his company in their stable. Although you shot at me twice before I left you, I did not want to hear of your being hurt, and am glad you are still living. It would do me good to go back to the dear old home again, and see Miss Mary and Miss Martha and Allen, Esther, Green, and Lee. Give my love to them all, and tell them I hope we will meet in the better world, if not in this. I would have gone back to see you all when I was working in the Nashville Hospital, but one of the neighbors told me that Henry intended to shoot me if he ever got a chance.

I want to know particularly what the good chance is you propose to give me. I am doing tolerably well here. I get twenty-five dollars a month, with victuals and clothing; have a comfortable home for Mandy,—the folks call her Mrs. Anderson,—and the children—Milly, Jane, and Grundy—go to school and are learning well. The teacher says Grundy has a head for a preacher. They go to Sunday school, and Mandy and me attend church regularly. We are kindly treated. Sometimes we overhear others saying, “Them colored people were slaves” down in Tennessee. The children feel hurt when they hear such remarks; but I tell them it was no disgrace in Tennessee to belong to Colonel Anderson. Many darkeys would have been proud, as I used to be, to call you master. Now if you will write and say what wages you will give me, I will be better able to decide whether it would be to my advantage to move back again.

As to my freedom, which you say I can have, there is nothing to be gained on that score, as I got my free papers in 1864 from the Provost-Marshal-General of the Department of Nashville. Mandy says she would be afraid to go back without some proof that you were disposed to treat us justly and kindly; and we have concluded to test your sincerity by asking you to send us our wages for the time we served you. This will make us forget and forgive old scores, and rely on your justice and friendship in the future. I served you faithfully for thirty-two years, and Mandy twenty years. At twenty-five dollars a month for me, and two dollars a week for Mandy, our earnings would amount to eleven thousand six hundred and eighty dollars. Add to this the interest for the time our wages have been kept back, and deduct what you paid for our clothing, and three doctor’s visits to me, and pulling a tooth for Mandy, and the balance will show what we are in justice entitled to. Please send the money by Adams’s Express, in care of V. Winters, Esq., Dayton, Ohio. If you fail to pay us for faithful labors in the past, we can have little faith in your promises in the future. We trust the good Maker has opened your eyes to the wrongs which you and your fathers have done to me and my fathers, in making us toil for you for generations without recompense. Here I draw my wages every Saturday night; but in Tennessee there was never any pay-day for the negroes any more than for the horses and cows. Surely there will be a day of reckoning for those who defraud the laborer of his hire.

In answering this letter, please state if there would be any safety for my Milly and Jane, who are now grown up, and both good-looking girls. You know how it was with poor Matilda and Catherine. I would rather stay here and starve—and die, if it come to that—than have my girls brought to shame by the violence and wickedness of their young masters. You will also please state if there has been any schools opened for the colored children in your neighborhood. The great desire of my life now is to give my children an education, and have them form virtuous habits.

Say howdy to George Carter, and thank him for taking the pistol from you when you were shooting at me.

From your old servant,

Jourdon Anderson.

— 

In August of 1865, a Colonel P.H. Anderson of Big Spring, Tennessee, wrote to his former slave, Jourdon Anderson, and requested that he come back to work on his farm. Jourdon — who, since being emancipated, had moved to Ohio, found paid work, and was now supporting his family — responded with this.

woke woke woke

abridged version: “oh you want me back? THEN FUCKIN PAY ME WHAT YOU OWE PIGNIGGA!!! and don’t think i forgot that you’re fuckin evil. you can suck this dick.”