mastectomy

F*CK CANCER…enough said

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#breastcancerawareness #breastcancer #breastcancerawarenessmonth #breastcancerwalk #breastcancersurvivor #breastcancermonth #thinkpink #susangkomen #raceforthecure #raceforacure #fuckcancer #cancersucks #pinkribbon #pink #believeinpink #savethetatas #mastectomy #fcancer #youngthug

аноним спросил(а):

Lol. If she really didn't want the public to know, that USWeekly exclusive never would've see the light of day. We'd have gotten news of her being a wife post marriage, if that were the case. Always remember the Angelina Jolie mastectomy that we never would've known had she not actually shared it. If an A lister like that could keep something private a secret...

Amen to all of this…

stigliz спросил(а):

11, 20, 28

11: Film(s) that had a lasting impact on you

Definitely Peter Pan (both Disney version and the live action from 2003) created my personality and I think that Juno made me rethink what parenting really is… hmn, what else… Oh, Why I Wore Lipstick To My Mastectomy because it changed the way I was thinking of cancer. And Monsters INC made me love relationships between characters and their parental figures (no, I don’t mean shipping romantically, I just mean that I always liked stories with other important parental figures than parents).

20: First concert you ever went to

… let’s ignore it.

28: Favourite author(s)

While everyone was reading Harry Potter and talking about JK, I was completely in love with Pierdomenico Baccalario and his books for kids and teenagers. Now I am 19 and obsessed with JK but what can I do… also I really liked one of Gillian Flynn books and I decided to read more soon and she has a chance to become one of my fave authors.

japantimes.co.jp
■気になる記事 - Cancer experts laud Angelina Jolie's decision to remove ovaries

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“SAN FRANCISCO – Two years after a double mastectomy, actress Angelina Jolie has had her ovaries and fallopian tubes removed to avoid the risk of ovarian cancer, a move cancer experts described as courageous and influential.”

Trastuzumab use during pregnancy: long-term survival after locally advanced breast cancer and long-term infant follow-up.

Here, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer 8 years ago. Her treatment course was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by mastectomy and then adjuvant radiotherapy and trastuzumab (TTZ). During the use of adjuvant targeted therapy, an incidental pregnancy was diagnosed. Four years later, she developed bone and cerebral metastases, and since then, she has received courses of TTZ, capecitabine, lapatinib, and radiotherapy with intermittent control of the disease. Her 7-year-old son presents a normal physical and long-term neurological developmental curve according to specialized evaluation. This case is unique for several reasons: the patient received the highest dose of TTZ yet described during pregnancy (4400 mg); there has been a long period of disease-free survival after treatment for locally advanced breast cancer and long overall survival despite successive disease progressions during the metastatic phase of the disease (97 months), and there was a monitored pediatric follow-up period (7 years). Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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Trastuzumab use during pregnancy: long-term survival after locally advanced breast cancer and long-term infant follow-up.

Here, we describe the case of a patient diagnosed with locally advanced breast cancer 8 years ago. Her treatment course was neoadjuvant chemotherapy, followed by mastectomy and then adjuvant radiotherapy and trastuzumab (TTZ). During the use of adjuvant targeted therapy, an incidental pregnancy was diagnosed. Four years later, she developed bone and cerebral metastases, and since then, she has received courses of TTZ, capecitabine, lapatinib, and radiotherapy with intermittent control of the disease. Her 7-year-old son presents a normal physical and long-term neurological developmental curve according to specialized evaluation. This case is unique for several reasons: the patient received the highest dose of TTZ yet described during pregnancy (4400 mg); there has been a long period of disease-free survival after treatment for locally advanced breast cancer and long overall survival despite successive disease progressions during the metastatic phase of the disease (97 months), and there was a monitored pediatric follow-up period (7 years). Copyright © 2016 Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

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'Love yourself': local transgender man opens up about top surgery

Love yourself.

That’s the message Dane Woodland is sharing this week, following his recent top surgery — a mastectomy and chest sculpting procedure for which he had been fundraising for the past year.

Woodland, who was born female but identifies as male, recently travelled to Mississauga, Ontario to have the operation.

The surgery removed both breasts and contoured his chest to give it a more masculine appearance. 

After returning to St. John’s following the surgery, he reached a significant milestone in his journey by officially completing the paperwork to change his birth certificate from female to male. 

The changes come after a year in which Woodland said he worked hard to improve his own self-image.

Road to surgery started last year

Woodland said he was feeling very self-conscious and anxious about his physical appearance around this time last year.

Like many people in their early 20s, he had a busy lifestyle: studying at Memorial University, working as a personal trainer at a fitness centre and bartending downtown on the weekends.

At work and in public, he said his gender dysphoria made it difficult to be fully comfortable as he was.

For the last year, he’s worn a binder under his clothes to conceal the large breasts he was born with.

As a personal trainer, however, Woodland said wearing it could be quite frustrating.

The binder often gave him rashes and affected his breathing as well as the type of clothes he could wear. 

He decided he wanted to have top surgery to help him feel more comfortable in his own skin. 

Difficult to receive government funding 

Although the federal government provides funding for a transgender mastectomy, the process comes with long wait times.

Woodland said this was hard to accept, given his mental and physical health.  

“There was no help from public health care,” he said.

“There is a wait list of about two to five years to get into the Canadian Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto to get diagnosed and then be referred.”

The funding also doesn't include contouring: the chest sculpting procedure that many female-to-male transgender people get following a mastectomy. 

Due to this, Woodland decided to create a GoFundMe page to raise money to have the surgery sooner, at a private clinic.

“I was going through a lot emotionally, it was very difficult for me,” he said. 

“With the opportunity to raise the money and get the surgery sooner, I definitely went for it because I can’t imagine waiting any longer than that.”

Through GoFundMe and other community fundraising events, Woodland was able to reach his goal.

The total cost of the surgery, not including transportation and after-surgery care, came to $7,910.

Surgery has increased confidence

Since having the surgery just over two weeks ago, Woodland said he already feels a lot better.

Many of the things that once made him hesitate, like showing his ID at airports or seeing himself in the mirror at work, are easier now.

“The gym is full of mirrors, so I was constantly looking out of the corner of my eye, or checking my shirt, or adjusting my jacket,” he said.

“I used to wear a jacket always when I was working, to make sure I was covering my chest and stuff like that to feel confident.”

“I’m wearing tighter clothing [now] and I’m feeling a lot more comfortable and confident.”

He said most members of his gym have been incredibly supportive. 

“Even people that I probably made the mistake of judging and assumed they probably wouldn’t be supportive of me, took the time to come over and introduce themselves and say, ‘I’m here if you need anything.’”

Woodland said he’s learned a lot in the past year and is trying his best to become a more visible advocate for the transgender community. 

“A lot of people have said to me they’ve learned stuff that they would have never otherwise had an opportunity to learn,” he said. “They’ve been motivated to do things differently and see things differently.”

“I had one client in particular, I remember she was having a conversation with me about a family member who was coping with someone who was coming out as gay, and she kind of looked at me and said, 'What do you think? Is it okay for people to be gay?’ and I said, 'well … let me tell you something.”’

Thankful for support from loved ones

Woodland has begun speaking at schools and said he’s often approached by others going through the same thing. 

He said it’s helped him realize how lucky he’s been to receive support from family and loved ones.

Woodland's partner, Heather Alexander, has been with him since the beginning.

The pair started dating shortly after Woodland started transitioning and Alexander said she's never once changed how she felt about him. 

“Before he had the top surgery, he put a lot of pressure on himself to look a certain way just because of his dysphoria,” she said. 

“I try to just tell him, 'You’re pushing for something bigger than yourself. It’s not just about what you’re facing on a daily basis. It’s how you represent a community that may not be so comfortable and confident to speak out.’”

After a year in which he’s experienced a huge physical and emotional transformation, Woodland says he has a few key takeaways. 

“It’s important to love yourself in every form,” he said. "Our bodies may not be the ideal of perfection, so I think it’s important to have that self-acceptance.“

 "That’s the biggest priority and the biggest thing I`ve learned in the last year.”

To the person on the left: You are going to cut your hair and you are going to start wearing “boys” clothes. People will make fun of you, but that is because they don’t understand. You don’t understand, but it will all make sense later. You are just doing what feels right and comfortable to you. By the age of 6, you are going to be diagnosed with Gender Identity Disorder and anger problems. You are going to grow your hair out again and you are going to try to play the part. You are going to spend the next 13 years trying to fit in, and hating every minute of it. But it won’t last forever, this I can assure you. To the person on the right: I couldn’t be more proud of you. YOU did it and are living proof that life gets better. You get better.


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Day after surgery

FUCKIN’ FUCK. everything hurts and I would like to die.

I’m barely eating, the medicine is making my stomach sick, and the compression bandage is riding weird. Being out of bed for more than about 5 minutes drains all of my energy. And I’m just like. Gotta keep it together. TOGETHER. GET YOUR SHIT TOGETHER.

Sadly, this experience makes me wish I hadve waited and just gotten the straight up mastectomy- there’s no way I’m gonna do this to myself again. Ugh oh god everything sucks.

And while my parents are still horrible people, at least my room is clean and warm and comfortable, and I’m not surrounded by the filth of the ex. I’m safe- physically, if not mentally. I gotta keep positive and think of how much worse it could be.

But holy Thor this sucks.

аноним спросил(а):

Sorry if this is too personal. Your top surgery looks great. I was wondering what doctor you went with and what type of surgery you had done. I'm super scared of getting a doctor that will screw up my chest and do a slopy job or something. Thanks.

i went to Dr. Juliana Hansen in portland, OR! she did a bilateral mastectomy w/ no free nipple grafts.

when u get to eventually have a consultation w/ a potential surgeon its super important to ask to see their portfolio, that way u can be sure that ur likely to get the results u want, and if u dont like their results u kno u need to keep shoppin around for surgeons.

TheDifferenceBetweenaPositiveBRCATestandaCancerDiagnosis

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Nearly three years ago, in May 2013, actress and humanitarian Angelina Jolie made an announcement that profoundly altered the way that women (and men) worldwide viewed breast cancer. In a New York Times op-ed piecetitled “My Medical Choice,” she revealed that she had “made a decision to have a preventive double mastectomy” because of a gene mutation that gave her “an 87 percent risk of breast…

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Day 1: New beginnings


I wanted to make a daily outfit of myself to help me transition into a more body positive look on myself.  Drawing myself publicly without breasts and a more masculine feel.   Doing this is going to be my own personal challenge to acceptance and new health.  In a few months, I’d like to get a double mastectomy of my chest (or something close to it) for both gender and health reasons.




So I was at the surgeon today, a very laid-back guy, and he had some good news and some bad news. The bad news is that there is no special date he could offer me, but I will be called if a date is free, so chances are that I’ll get surgery in April or May maybe, August at the latest. The good news is that my chest size is so small they’ll just do some sort of liposuction which will also remove most of the glands. He also thinks there won’t be much complication and good recovery, so I will be able to undergo one of the easiest options to get a manly chest.
So I’ll wait for my phone call the next months …

#Repost @blackhearttattoos with @repostapp.
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So today I had the pleasure of doing my first mastectomy/breast tattoo!!! We all get tattoos to make us feel good about ourselves and our bodies , an this tattoo was very special indeed…. Ive been given permission to show you all a before and after photo of my client’s breast Her bravery today was inspirational and her story also I can’t thank her enough for trusting me and it was her FIRST tattoo !!! I really love my job and on days like today I wish I could show all the haters what a wonderful thing we can do for people , especially when you see their reaction in the mirror !!!! It was amazing experience and I would do it again in a heartbeat . Cheers guys
Becks 😈 @blackheart33 #mastectomy #mastectomytattoo #breasttattoo #colourwork #tattoo #uktattoo #totaltattoo #totaltattoomagazine #beautifulwoman (at Black Heart Tattoo Studio)