masks-and-mobsters

5 Day Art Challenge- Day 3

Continuing the trend of putting up art from past projects, here is some art I did from an issue of thejoshuawilliamson and Mike Henderson’s MASKS AND MOBSTERS from monkeybraincomics (later collected by @imagecomics). They have since re-teamed for the kick-ass book NAILBITER, also from imagecomics, and if you’re not already reading it, get on board.

I’m only going to throw up some odds and ends, a few preliminary drawings and some finished art. I worked with washes a lot for this one, and I think it’s the only book where I did the tones right on the actual pages. Working on this short taught me a lot about washes that I brought into that second arc of WASTELAND.

Hi internet people! Here we have something I colored for my main dude Mike Henderson while back. This is a colored version of his & Joshua Williamson Masks & Mobsters #9. Truly a great book check it out! And if you’re not into digital comics as it happens they just released a Hard Cover collection pick it up you won’t regret it.

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Preview: Masks and Mobsters #9
The mob keeps dumping dead bodies in the Golden City Harbor, which doesn’t sit well with a mysterious underwater citizen. But does this underwater masked man become friend or foe to the Mobsters? Featuring a special tale written by artist Mike Henderson!   MASKS AND MOBSTERS #9
$.99 – Ages 15+  Joshua Williamson, Script Assist
Mike Henderson, Artist, Writer and Cover Direct link to purchase:
http://cmxl.gy/11wZRFB
Image Expo: Joshua Williamson Brings Us a “Nailbiter”

by Brian Salvatore

Coming in May from the “Masks and Mobsters” team of Joshua Williamson and Mike Henderson is “Nailbiter,” a story about “the serial killer next door.” The book, set in a small Oregon town, is about a serial killer who eats their victim’s nails. A tagline teased was, “What would you do if someone you loved was a serial killer?”

Williamson already writes “Ghosted” for Image, as well as “Captain Midnight” for Dark Horse.

Read more

You ever wonder how the men women in organized crime adapt and survive while their city is being watched by super heroes and plagued by super villains?

When The Golden City is inundated by heroes and villains, the local mob has to figure out how to combat pesky crime fighters who can’t be paid off and villains who won’t pay up.

Interested? You can purchase it on Comixology for $0.99 an issue.

IT’S CAPES VS. TOMMY GUNS IN MASKS AND MOBSTERS

Acclaimed digital series gets hardcover collection from Image Comics/Shadowline

MASKS AND MOBSTERS was hailed as one of the best webcomics of the year when it was released by MonkeyBrain in 2012, and now the Image Comics imprint Shadowline is bringing it to print in style, with a deluxe hardcover edition that collects all seven issues. Written by Joshua Williamson (GHOSTED, DEAR DRACULA) and drawn by Mike Henderson, Ryan Cody, Jason Copland, and Justin Greenwood, MASKS AND MOBSTERS explores the secret stories of superheroes and mobsters vying for control of Golden City.

Writer Williamson imagines a world where, in the 1930s and ‘40s, superheroes and supervillains didn’t start appearing just in the pages of comic books but in flesh-and-blood life, confronting the underground powers that had maintained a fearful status quo.

"One of the things that always has stuck with me was… if all these superheroes started to pop up, how did that affect the mob’s business?” said Williamson. “The masked men couldn’t be paid off, and the supervillains didn’t care about paying dues, right? How did organized crime deal with it all? I wanted to see that world from their perspective.”

Praise for MASKS AND MOBSTERS:

“Best digital series [of 2012]… an intriguing black-and-white tale about gangsters, snitches and the first caped do-gooders.”
– USA Today

“Smart work brilliantly presented. My favorite Monkeybrain series.”
– Mark Waid

"MASKS & MOBSTERS is such a fantastic idea that I burn with jealousy I didn’t think of it first. Fortunately, Joshua Williamson, Mike Henderson, and company are doing things with the notion that I never could have imagined possible. One of my absolute favorite comics currently being published."
– Chris Roberson

MASKS AND MOBSTERS is a 128-page, black and white hardcover, retailing for $19.99 (ISBN 978-1-60706-765-8). It will be in stores on July 3 and can be pre-ordered from the May issue of Previews.

Preview: Masks and Mobsters #10

Preview: Masks and Mobsters #10 #comics #digitalcomics

Masks and Mobsters #10

Joshua Williamson, Writer
Seth Damoose, Artist
Zen, Letterer

Before the hero Doctor Daylight died he trained a group of young street youths called the “BULLY SMASHERS!” To say that his young wards are not taking his death very well…

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This week I picked up Masks and Mobsters #10. It was written by Joshua Williamson, has art by Seth Damoose, and the spooky cover above by Vinny Naverrete.

Masks and Mobsters was the first Monkeybrain Comics title I picked up. I’m not normally a fan of black and white comics, I don’t really know why it’s just a thing, but I couldn’t resist the premise of how would a city’s gangsters deal with the sudden influx of caped crusaders. I’m just a sucker for a bad guy really and Masks & Mobsters focuses exclusively on them. The quality of Masks and Mobsters has lead me to pick up quite a few other Monkeybrain comics.

I like the way Masks and Mobsters is just a series of little short stories but there are clear links to a greater narrative. Issue 10 picks up on an earlier story and introduces a group of street kids called the “Bully Smashers” who were trained by the now deceased Doctor Daylight. I loved the fact that the fearless one of the group was Nancy as they went on the spooky journey to “The Super Secret Masks’ Graveyard”. Also there is a 1920’s, American bad-ass Harry Potter, I kid you not. The story feels predictable and then boom, Williamson changes it up and now I really want to see the continuation of this arc. I really love the heavy use of black in the art as well, it really fits with the spooky graveyard atmosphere. It is a cleaner style than some of the earlier issues, but I like the way the series utilises a range of artists to keep things fresh.

I’m really liking Masks and Mobsters and even though I have them all on my iPad I am definitely going to pick-up the recently released collected hardcover version from Image Comics.

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PREVIEW: MASKS AND MOBSTERS #6

What makes a hero in Golden City? Is it putting on a mask? Saving the day? Or just being in the wrong place at the wrong time? A mobster from the past returns with a scarred face, asking those same questions and will kill anyone to get answers.

USA Today called, MASKS AND MOBSTERS, the BEST DIGITAL COMIC OF 2012

  • Joshua Williamson, Writer
  • Justin Greenwood, Artist
  • $.99 – Ages 15+

Masks & Mobsters: Advance Hardcover Review by FBC Guest Contributor Tim Palmer!

Masks & Mobsters, another great title from digital publisher Monkeybrain Comics, is a crime anthology written by Joshua Williamson, with art by Mike Henderson, with guest artists Jason Copland, Justin Greenwood, Ryan Cody, and Seth Damoose popping up throughout.  Masks & Mobsters takes place during the 1920s, its stories relating what happens when superheroes (masks, as the mobsters disdainfully refer to them) first start showing up in Golden City, putting the squeeze on the local crime syndicates, and how the criminal underworld retaliates.  The art is all in glorious black and white, which perfectly captures the rough edges of the crime world, while also bringing a simple elegance to the time period.  There are shadows galore, and Henderson and the other artists use them effectively, an element of danger and mystery hanging over each issue.  This first print collection is being published in a classy hardcover by the Image Comics imprint Shadowline, and includes the first ten issues, which are two more than are currently being offered digitally.  Also, each issue has a page of rough artwork showing character or cover sketches, which helps give an idea of how this world is continually growing and developing not only through Joshua Williamson’s stories, but also through the artwork.

Click here for the full review!