mary pickford*

Perfumes of Old Hollywood Actresses

Ava Gardner: Acqua di Parma Colonia, Fracas, Tabu, Jungle Gardenia, was photographed with Mitsouko; Reporter recalled her perfume being intoxicating, French and exotic (smells like Fracas, no?); She would also spritz perfume in a pathway leading to her room after fights with Frank Sinatra to let him know she was ready to make up.

Anouk Aimee: Guerlain Apres L’ondee

Vivien Leigh: Joy by Jean Patou (was said to stop to pick up a bottle while touring; gifted perfume by Dior.

Marilyn Monroe: Chanel N5, Joy by Jean Patou, Fracas; was said to take ice baths with drops of perfume.

Elizabeth Taylor: Femme Rochas, Bal a Versaille, Givenchy L’interdit (in honor of friend Audrey Hepburn), White Diamonds (and her other fragrances, presumably), said she liked to mix several perfumes before she came out with her own line; Colin Farrell said “Violet Eyes” smells as he remembers her smelling.

Rita Hayworth: Shalimar, Arpege, Fracas; collected perfume.

Brigitte Bardot: Jicky by Guerlain, Vent Vert by Balmain, Fracas.

Catherine Deneuve: Chanel N5, N19 and N22, Guerlain L’Heure Bleu and Chamade, Frederic Malle Iris Poudre, Carnal Flower, Eau de Magnolia, and Lipstick Rose, Serge Lutens Fleur d’Oranger, Un Lys, and Rose de Nuit, Annick Goutal Sables,  Francis Kurkdjian Lumiere Noire for Her (originally created for her).

Grace Kelly: Creed Fleurissimo (made for her wedding, inspired by her bouquet), Jean Patou Joy,

Claudia Cardinale: L’Air du Temps

Claudette Colbert: Vol de Nuit

Audrey Hepburn: Givenchy L’interdit (created for her), Creed Spring Flower (created for her), Guerlain Chamade, Acqua di Parma Colonia, Femme Rochas, Ivorie Balmain (original)

Gloria Swanson: Joy, Youth Dew, Narcisse Noir

Ingrid Bergman: Guerlain Mitsouko

Jane Russell: Chanel Coco

Jayne Mansfield: Lanvin My Sin, Arpege, Shiaperelli Shocking

Jean Harlow: Mitsouko by Guerlain

Joan Collins: Guerlain Shalimar and Jicky

Joan Crawford: Youth Dew, Jungle Gardenia

Lana Turner: L'air du Temps

Lauren Bacall: loved Diptyque scents, especially L'Ombre dans L'Eau

Marlene Dietrich: Fracas, Tabac Blond, Bandit, Vole du Nuit

Mary Pickford: Crepe De Chine, Joy, Patou

Olivia de Havilland: Joy

Sophia Loren: Irisia, Diva (I also read she wore Shalimar)

Natalie Wood: Jungle Gardenia by Tuvache (her favorite flowers were gardenias)

Last Updated: 4/14/16 12am

After Theda Bara appeared in ‘A Fool There Was,’ a vampire wave surged over the country. Women appeared in vampire gowns, pendant earrings, and even young girls were attempting to change from frank, open-eyed ingenues to the almond-eyed, carmine-lipped woman of subtlety and mystery.
—  – Mary Pickford, “To Be Or Not To Be a Vampire”, The Day [New London, CT] (16 May 1916), p. 11
10

Happy Birthday Mary Pickford!
Born Gladys Louise Smith April 8, 1892


Mary began her acting career on stage at age 7 to help support her widowed mother and siblings.
She went on to become one of the greatest and most loved silent film stars throughout the entire era only to falter when talkies came about.
Her acting career may have ended but not her movie career, she went on to produce in the company she help found, United Artists.
She had a wonderfully fascinating life that should be remembered and celebrated forever!
Here’s to you on your birthday Mary!


Today’s Google Doodle: Mary Pickford’s 125th Birthday

“Lights, camera, action! Today’s doodle honors the “Queen of the Movies,” Mary Pickford. An actress, a film director, and a producer, Mary Pickford proved that actors weren’t relegated to careers in front of the camera. She co-founded the film studio United Artists and was one of the original 36 founders of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.

Before she became one of the most powerful women who has ever worked in Hollywood, she was “the girl with the curls,” and one of the most beloved stars of the silent film era. She appeared in as many as 50 films per year, and eventually negotiated wages that were equal to half of each of her films’ profits. She went on to demand full creative and financial control of her films, a feat still unheard of to this day.  She used her stardom to bring awareness to causes close to her heart. She sold Liberty Bonds during World War I, created the Motion Picture Relief Fund, and revolutionized the film industry by giving independent film producers a way to distribute their films outside the studio system. She won an Academy Award for Best Actress, for her role in Coquette (1929), and an honorary Academy Award for lifetime achievement in 1976.

Today, we pay tribute to Mary Pickford’s enterprising leadership on what would be her 125th birthday.”