marvel comics in the movies

A reminder about effective boycotting:

You have to be specific, and you have to be universal.

What does this mean? It means that Marvel will only stop publishing shit that literally looks like Nazi propaganda if you let them know that that specific thing is what you’re not interested in. That means:

1. Don’t change your buying habits (or even increase them!) for unrelated products (movies, any series not lead by Nick Spencer and his boys club, etc)

2. You have to avoid ALL of those comics. Marvel isn’t going to see a drop in movie attendance and think “Oh we should stop making Nazi propaganda”, they’ll assign that drop to any of the many many decisions their movie department has made.

Global boycotts of all a company’s products can only work effectively if you’re trying to put the company totally out of business. If there’s one specific thing you’d like to do, you need to target it.

dating advice: the “captain america” rule

Context: I grew up in a family of nerds, and superheroes were always a really big part of my childhood. Captain America was a favorite, and he kind of became my family’s standard for good behavior and just generally being a Nice Person. (If one of the kids started a fight they’d get hit with, “What would Captain America think of how you’re acting?”, stuff like that.)

So when I got to high school and started dating, my mom told me something that sounds funny but in retrospect actually turned out to be really good advice:

“Date someone who treats you the way Captain America would. Never settle for less.” 

And this has actually helped me so much in my dating life, through high school and into my adult years, because even if it’s a little silly, it’s been really helpful to have that standard in the back of my mind when I’m first going into a relationship. 

Would Captain America ignore my calls? Would Captain America forget my birthday? Would Captain America get mad at me for cancelling a date because a family emergency came up? If the answer is no, then I know that the person I’m currently dating does not meet my standards, and that I need to break things off before they get too serious.

And your standard absolutely does not have to be Captain America, specifically. It can be any person, male or female, real or fictional, who is known for being respectful and considerate. It can even be an imaginary “soulmate” that you make up yourself. The point is to have a specific idea of how you expect to be treated by your romantic partners, and to refuse to compromise or settle for less. (Just make sure you’re holding yourself to the same standards – you can’t expect to date superheroes if you’re going to treat your partners the way a supervillain would.) This is a really good way to keep yourself from falling into bad relationships where you aren’t treated with the respect and care you deserve.

TL;DR: You deserve to date people who are respectful and considerate of you. You deserve a Captain America. Don’t settle for less. 

I hear so many people talk about how great it is that they didn’t get into comics, or that they stopped buying single issues of comics. They say things like “It was getting pretty bad before I had to stop myself,” as if they’re discussing heroin or punching elementary schoolers. Comics had ceased to be things that they consistently enjoyed and had become things that they felt like they had to finish. They had to buy every issue of every title so that they could potentially grasp one narrative. You know why a major book being a “standalone title” is often seen as such a awesome thing in comics? It’s definitely not because they come around very often.

There’s something so satisfying about holding a single issue of a comic book in your hands. It’s light, colorful, and reminds you of the good times you had before you had to start paying for the things that kept you alive. So I hate to say “Time to scrap that concept,” but the comic book industry needs to lean into the skid of what’s actually working. If digital comics are on the rise, do more to promote those. If people are more likely to read trade paperbacks or full-length graphic novels, have more writers working toward creating them. I would much rather buy a graphic novel for $16.99 than a collection of single issues (some of which are probably terrible) for $30.

I don’t think single issues of comics will ever go away, at least not in the near future. But I do think that a business model that deals mostly with what’s working is a good step toward making sure that the comic industry isn’t extinct in 20 years.

4 Ways Comic Books Are Losing Touch With Their Audience

Me watching LOGAN
  • Laura: (*Literally chopped a person's head off*)
  • Me: THAT'S MY GIRL!
  • Also Laura: (*Used her claws to gouge a person's eyes*)
  • Me: (*Wiped my tears*) I'm so proud of her.