martin luther university

20-year-old Bernie Sanders organizing a protest against segregated university housing at his Alma mater, the University of Chicago in 1962

“We feel it is an intolerable situation when Negro and white students of the university cannot live together in university-owned apartments,” Sanders said at the protest. Sanders and 32 other students then entered the building and camped outside the president’s office, performing the first civil rights sit-in in Chicago history

Sanders is one of only two sitting United States Senators who was personally in attendance at Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have a Dream” speech. The other was Senator Mitch McConnell.

On this day in 1960, 34 brave students from Virginia Union University staged a sit-in at a segregated lunch counter in Thalhimer’s Department Store (which stood at Broad and 6th Street), after a campus visit from Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. All thirty-four were subsequently arrested, in the first mass arrest of the civil rights movement of 1960, and became known across the country as the Richmond 34.

The 34 challenged their convictions and took their case all the way to the national Supreme Court, where the conviction was overturned in a legal victory for civil rights nationwide.

The names of the Richmond 34 are: Elizabeth Patricia Johnson, Joanna Hinton, Gloria C. Collins, Patricia A. Washington, Barbara A. Thornton, Lois B. White, Thalma Y. Hickman, Celia E. Jones, Carolyn Ann Horne, Marise L. Ellison, Virginia G. Simms, Frank George Pinkston, Charles Melvin Sherrod, Albert Van Graves Jr., Ford Tucker Johnson Jr., Leroy M. Bray Jr., Wendell T. Foster Jr., Anderson J. Franklin, Ronald B. Smith, Larry Pridgen, Woodrow B. Grant, Joseph E. Ellison, Gordon Coleman, Milton Johnson, Donald Vincent-Goode, Robert B. Dalton, Samuel F. Shaw, Randolph A. Tobias, Clarence A. Jones, Richard C. Jackson, George Wendall Harris Jr., John J. McCall, Leotis L. Pryor, and Raymond B. Randolph Jr.

Halle (Saale) in Sachsen-Anhalt, Eastern Germany. Its university is one of the oldest in Germany. The city is situated along the river Saale; Leipzig is only 35 km away. Halle’s early history is connected with harvesting of salt. The name reflects early Celtic settlement given that ‘halen’ is the Brythonic (Welsh/Breton) word for salt (cf. 'salann’ in Irish). The name of the river Saale also contains the Germanic root for salt. Salt-harvesting has taken place here at least since the Bronze Age (2300-600 BC). The town was first mentioned in AD 806. It became a part of the Archbishopric of Magdeburg in the 10th century and remained so until 1680, when Brandenburg-Prussia annexed it together with Magdeburg as the Duchy of Magdeburg, while it was also an important location for Martin Luther’s Reformation. According to historic documents, the city of Halle has been a member of the Hanseatic League at least since 1281.

How Ants Go Marching and Never Cause Traffic Jams

by Joel N. Shurkin, Inside Science

The old children’s song about marching ants is a good explanation for why traffic engineers love them.

Ants – most are teeny creatures with brains smaller than pinheads – engineer traffic better than humans. Ants never run into stop-and-go-traffic or gridlock on the trail. In fact, the more ants of one species there are on the road, the faster they go, according to new research.

Researchers from two German universities, the Universities of Potsdam and the Martin Luther University of Halle-Wittenberg, found a nest of black meadow ants (Formica pratensis) in the woods of Saxony. The nest had four trunk trails leading to foraging areas, some of them 60 feet long. They chose a small area and set up a camera that took time-lapse photography, and recorded the ants coming through the zone.

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