martin luther king jr.'s war protest

10

Free at last, they took your life
They could not take your pride

-U2, Pride

1. Martin Luther King Jr.: Civil rights activist; killed April 1968

2. John Lennon: Musician; killed December 1980

3. Mahatma Gandhi: leader of Indian independence movement and advocate for nonviolent protest; killed January 1948

4. Harvey Milk: First openly gay american politician to be elected to public office; killed November 1978

5. Robert F. Kennedy: Brother of JFK, american senator and democratic presidential candidate nominee; killed June 1968 during presidential campaign

6. Benazir Bhutto: Pakistan’s first and only female prime minister, first woman to be elected as the head of an Islamic state’s government; killed December 2007

7. Abraham Lincoln: US President, abolisher of slavery; killed April 1865

8. Indira Gandhi: First and only female prime minister of India; killed October 1984

9. Anwar Sadat: President of Egypt, won Nobel Peace Prize for negotiations of peace with Israel; killed November 1981

10. John F Kennedy: US president, passed civil rights acts; killed November 1963

Throughout the twentieth century, black women persisted in telling their stories…Their testimonies spilled out in letters to the Justice Department and appeared on the front pages of the nation’s leading black newspapers. Black women regularly denounced their sexual misuse. By deploying their voices as weapons in the wars against white supremacy, whether in the church, the courtroom, or in congressional hearings, African-American women loudly resisted what Martin Luther King, Jr., called the “thingification”, of their humanity. Decades before radical feminists in the women’s movement urges rape survivors to “speak out,” African-American women’s public protests galvanized local, national, and even international outrage and sparked larger campaigns for racial justice and human dignity. When Recy Taylor spoke out against her assailants and Rosa Parks and her allies in Montgomery mobilized in defense of her womanhood in 1944, they joined this tradition of testimony and protest.
— 

Danielle L. McGuire, At the Dark End of the Street: Black Women, Rape and Resistance–A New History of the Civil Rights Movement from Rosa Parks to the Rise of Black Power


(also more reasons why the “wave” way of looking at feminism is problematic as all hell. It ignores the work Black women have been doing by centering the Feminist time-line only on White women’s political work)