marlboroughs

Artist Immeserses Gown In The Dead Sea For 2 Years And It Transforms Into a Salt Crystal Masterpiece

Israeli artist Sigalit Landau decided to submerge herself into the mystery and effects of the Dead Sea. She dipped a down in the salt-rich waters in 2014, and recently removed it to be seen for display. The results are a stunning crystallized dress, which seems nothing short of surreal and straight from a fairy tale. Take a look below at the uncanny images.

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For her project titled Salt Bride, Israeli artist Sigalit Landau decided to submerge a black gown in the Dead Sea. The gown spent 2 months in the salt-rich waters in 2014, and as you can see from these stunning pictures, the end result is nothing short of magical.

The project is an eight-part photo series inspired by S. Ansky’s 1916 play titled Dybbuk. The play is about a young Hasidic woman who becomes possessed by the spirit of her dead lover, and Landau’s salt-encrusted gown is a replica of the one worn in the dramatic production of the 1920s.

Landau checked on the black gown various times in order to capture the gradual process of salt crystalisation that you can see in the pictures below. You can also see them at London’s Marlborough Contemporary, where they’ll be on display until September 3rd. (Source)

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Smallsword

  • Dated: circa 1655
  • Culture: French
  • Medium: steel, iron
  • Measurements: ovarall lenght 101.4 cm
  • Provenance: Emperor Charles VI; by whom given to the 1st Duke of Marlborough; Bland from whom bought by George IV, 4th March 1789 

This sword was purchased by the future George IV in 1789 to further enhance what was already a substantial collection of historic weapons. In the manuscript catalogue of his Armoury at Carlton House. This sword is said to have been given by the Emperor Charles VI (1685-1740) to the first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722) and its hilt - like that of the so-called Hampden sword and the embossed parade shield - was attributed to Benvenuto Cellini.

While the second of these claims can be set aside on the simple grounds that Cellini made no swords, the supposed provenance, though uncorroborated, is not so implausible; Charles VI did indeed present a sword to the Duke of Marlborough in 1703, but that sword had a hilt set with diamonds.

The iron hilt demonstrates a range of techniques executed to the highest standard. The pommel, with its four-headed tang-button (or finial), shells and quillons, is forged, chiselled and pierced; while the grip, which is made of wood cut with spiralling grooves in two directions, is bound with steel wire and overlaid by a further network of twisted wire.

The precise subject matter of the figurative decoration has not been identified. On one side of the pommel is a scene of soldiers in Roman dress approaching a town, and on the other is a group of captives led before an officer standing in a chariot.

The larger scenes on the shells are the same on both sides, one in the opposite direction to the other; they comprise a cavalry combat with a commander in a cartouche, and soldiers presenting captured colours to a commander. The quillons are in the form of satyrs, and the other secondary motifs include serpents, masks and naked, winged children. The blade is probably a near-contemporary replacement.

Catalogue entry from Royal Treasures, “A Golden Jubilee Celebration”, London 2002.

Source: Copyright 2014 © Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

Evening Gown | Callot Soeurs | c. 1907

This evening gown is a delicate confection of silk satin, silk tulle, and thousands of hand-tinted and hand-embroidered glass bugle beads. It was once owned by the internationally famous beauty Consuelo Vanderbilt (1877–1964), who at the time she donned this creation was the 9th Duchess of Marlborough.Consuelo had been the wealthiest of the American “Dollar Princesses”—destined after her arranged marriage to be mistress of Blenheim Palace in Oxfordshire,England—the only private palace in Britain. Her magnificent gown is attributed to the French couture house Callot Soeurs, and was likely worn as dinner attire.

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Small Sword

  • Dated: circa 1655
  • Culture: French
  • Medium: iron, steel, wood, wire
  • Provenance: Emperor Charles VI; by whom given to the 1st Duke of Marlborough. Bland from whom bought by George IV, 4th March 1789 (£26 15s)

This sword was purchased by the future George IV in 1789 to further enhance what was already a substantial collection of historic weapons. In the manuscript catalogue of his Armoury at Carlton House this sword is said to have been given by the Emperor Charles VI (1685-1740) to the first Duke of Marlborough (1650-1722) and its hilt - like that of the so-called Hampden sword and the embossed parade shield - was attributed to Benvenuto Cellini.

While the second of these claims can be set aside on the simple grounds that Cellini made no swords, the supposed provenance, though uncorroborated, is not so implausible; Charles VI did indeed present a sword to the Duke of Marlborough in 1703, but that sword had a hilt set with diamonds. The iron hilt demonstrates a range of techniques executed to the highest standard. The pommel, with its four-headed tang-button (or finial), shells and quillons, is forged, chiselled and pierced; while the grip, which is made of wood cut with spiralling grooves in two directions, is bound with steel wire and overlaid by a further network of twisted wire.

The precise subject matter of the figurative decoration has not been identified. On one side of the pommel is a scene of soldiers in Roman dress approaching a town, and on the other is a group of captives led before an officer standing in a chariot. The larger scenes on the shells are the same on both sides, one in the opposite direction to the other; they comprise a cavalry combat with a commander in a cartouche, and soldiers presenting captured colours to a commander. The quillons are in the form of satyrs, and the other secondary motifs include serpents, masks and naked, winged children. The blade is probably a near-contemporary replacement.

Source: Copyright © 2015 Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

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Gladys, Duchess of Marlborough photographes herself in front of a mirror, wearing Empress Alexandra Feodorovna of Russia’s Pearl Kokoshnik Tiara, by Bolin (1921).