marine illustration

Tentacles and Beaks of Cephalopods | December, 2015

Investigating the anatomical differences of cephalopod beaks and tentacles with regards to their diet.

Trapped in time within the Warp, and lost from imperial record none remember them, their deeds, their fell mission.

But their ‘sentence’ finally ended, their stint in 'hell’ is over, now just as the Empire needs them more then ever Persephone and her Daughters have returned!

Space Marine women to the front(line)!
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This was an enjoyably image to work on, based on the iconic Ultramarine from the THQ space marine game. I got to try a few new things and cement a bit of my work flow when making this kind of image. Faster would be better, and one is never 100% satisfied with an image. But I am happy enough for now. Enjoy :)

Happy Veterans Day to our real-life superheroes! Today we give thanks to all who put the freedoms and safety, we all take for granted, before their own. We give thanks to those who’s selfless nature and sacrifices too often go unnoticed. So reach out to those veterans in your life give them a big ol’ hug and thank them. To all the veterans out there, THANK YOU!! Today you will be noticed. 🇺🇸

Unsolved Paleo Mysteries Month #12 – Muddled Mosasaurs

Numerous groups of reptiles have “returned to the water” and become aquatic over the last three hundred million years, but tracing their direct ancestry can be surprisingly difficult. Highly modified and specialized anatomy, lack of transitional forms, and similar features convergently evolving multiple times can all obscure relationships, making it hard to properly classify them.

We’re only just starting to figure out the true origin of turtles (they’re probably archosauromorphs), and they’re a marine reptile group with living members.

Some of the extinct ones are even more uncertain. For example: mosasaurs. (Represented here by the eponymous Mosasaurus.)

While some semi-aquatic early mosasaurs are known, and they seem to be closely related to aigialosaurs and dolichosaurs, their exact placement within the squamates is a lot less clear. Traditionally they were regarded as the sister group to snakes, but some studies have found them to be closer to monitor lizards instead, and others have even placed them as much more basal scleroglossans. Their classification in phylogenetic analyses is “highly unstable”, changing depending on what other reptile groups are included, so there’s no real current consensus.

(And even if they are most closely related to snakes, that doesn’t necessarily help much – the exact origin and evolution of snakes is still very poorly known, too!)