marine educators

anonymous asked:

Any advice for someone that loves all things marine life but can't pursue marine biology because they suck at math and science? Asking for a friend.

Hey there! I do have some suggestions for potential career paths that relate to marine biology. I hope this short list is helpful.

1) Ecotourism is a huge industry that is quickly growing, particularly for coastal environments. Right now, there is a high demand for guided nature cruises and kayak trips as well as shelling and providing beach ecosystem education.

2) Environmental journalism/photography/videography are options for someone who enjoys writing or taking photos. Either as a freelance writer/photographer or as part of a publication, you’ll likely travel to see marine life as well as interview people who are in the marine biology field. You’ll also likely encounter fisherman and others who make their livelihood from the ocean, so you’ll get to meet some really interesting people. With videography, you could help film footage for documentaries.

3) Marine life education can be provided as an aquarium educator or nature preserve employee. You can guide people on tours, provide information on the different organisms, and observe the animals’ daily behavior so that you can alert the aquarist at the aquarium about behavioral changes.

4) SCUBA/snorkeling guides get to interact with wildlife daily. You’ll also likely be exposed to maneuvering a vessel. This is under the umbrella of ecotourism, but you’ll be under the water instead of on it. The captain and first mate lead tours almost every day of the week. You’ll learn where specific wildlife like to congregate and get to provide a bit of education to the clientele.

5) Boat captains/first mates/maritime police are connected to many of these other careers and would be a good option for someone who likes boating. You’ll learn navigation and maritime laws as well as gain valuable insight from seasoned skippers. You could captain tours or research expeditions, or you could enforce maritime law.

6) Park rangers/fish and game wardens are also rewarding positions that can give you exposure to marine life. Whether employed by a private company or local/state/federal government, you’ll get to protect wildlife and provide education to park visitors.

speaking of my dad’s somewhat disgusting career, my favorite story involving trying to tell people what he does for a living is this one:

I took french in 4th-6th grade, and at some point we were learning words for professions. The teacher had us go around the circle and say what our parents did, and then she’d tell us the word in for that profession in french, and we’d repeat it. Real cutting-edge pedagogical technique, clearly.
So we went around, learning french words for things like “dentist” and “restaurant owner” and “accountant” and “electrician”. Then she got to me.
“Mica, what does your mother do?” she asked, unsuspectingly.
“She makes larger than life, anatomically accurate, fully dissectible models of marine animals for nonprofit educational purposes” I said, giving my very practiced ‘mama’s job spiel’.
My teacher’s face was a study in blank incomprehension.
“Euh.” she said, “And… and what about your father?”
“He installs alternative eco-friendly wastewater treatment systems!” I said, now smiling broadly like the little shit I was.
“……” She was looking distinctly hunted now.
“He used to be a carpenter?” I added, doing what may or may not have been a convincing impression of 'helpful innocence’.
“Ah, charpentier.” she said, grasping the lifeline like a drowning person.

I have never in my life seen a person look more relieved to hear the word carpenter.

99.9% of wording courtesy of my co-worker and friend. 

The hypocrisy of people against SeaWorld is infuriating. I am going to start by saying I 100% support our military, their use of animals, and the bond between all animals and people. This is not a criticism of the story in this movie, but an example of hypocrisy. The woman behind this movie (Gabriela Cowperthwaite) is the same woman behind Blackfish. So, she is OK with training dogs to enter situations where they can be shot or blown up, but she’s not OK with training killer whales and other marine mammals to educate the public and inspire them to care about the planet? (By the way, the military also uses dolphins.) This director believes in the extraordinary bond between these dogs and soldiers but not between other animals and people!? (She did all she could to belittle and minimize the importance and even existence of the the bond between the trainers and whales in Blackfish.) Smells just like that cancerous website, The Dodo. The Dodo is run (with Daddy’s money) by a woman named Izzie Lerer. She happens to be an avid equestrian. She keeps horses in stalls and rides them for her enjoyment and entertainment, yet one of her biggest focuses is spreading negative propaganda against SeaWorld for…using animals for entertainment. Both women use manipulation and sensationalism to further their careers and business despite condoning and sharing stories, and participating in activities, that share the same fundamental principles. 

#DidYouKnow - The narrower the pupil in relation to the horizon, the greater accuracy of depth perception in peripheral vision? Pair that with the fact that the octopuses optical nerve fibers are behind retina and you get absolutely no blind spot which means an octopus can see everything that is going on in their environment. Pretty cool huh nation?! 📸: Gustavo Maqueda

Follow the largest octopus blog on Instagram: www.instagram.com/octonation

medium.com
Women in Science You Should Be Following On Social Media
Your Guide To #WomeninSTEM on Social
By Sci Chic

Hey check out who made the list ;) 

This list does a great job of covering a bunch of different fields within STEM so even if you are not interested in space there will be something for you!

New Beginnings, Part Two

Chapter Two
“Not Too Insane For You“

{MASTERLIST}

Word Count: 2.5K

WARNINGS: LOTS OF ANGST, EXPLICIT LANGUAGE, DEPRESSION, REJECTION, GRAPHIC VIOLENCE, MURDER DETAILS, HOUSE FIRES, CRIME SCENE DETAILS. BE SAFE, DEAR READERS!

{Unbeta’d}

A/N: This chapter showcases our reader’s background and upbringing.

My name is Y/N L/N. I’ve lived all over the country, but I consider Chicago, Illinois to be where I’m from. My mom’s name is Jennifer and she’s an accountant. My dad’s name is Frank and he is a retired Marine, having served in Desert Storm twice. I have two little brothers named Alan and Jimmy. They’re twins and 5 years younger than me.

Keep reading

Sea turtles ultimately grow from the size of a dinner plate to that of a dinner table. In the case of the leatherback sea turtle, this can take up to a decade. Happy World Turtle Day!

From the TED-Ed Lesson The survival of the sea turtle - Scott Gass

Animation by Cinematic Sweden

@sixpenceee

why is it that i make a fanfic where a child gets kidnapped and everyone looses their shit, and yet when you use child rape as a ~spoopy~ plot device nobody bats an eye?

why is it that i cant be genuinely educational about marine life without getting dismisssed, yet your bullshit pseudoscience gets leverage?

why is it that people like me are basically eldrich horrors in your stories but then we’re only “people” when you can make money off of us?

why is it that you can’t stay in your lane of expertise, and even still acknowledge that you might be the slightest bit innaccurate?

why do people still support you?

“People who have faced death often speak of their lives flashing before their lives. Something much different happened to dolphin trainer Richard O'Barry when one of the dolphins that played Flipper on television died of stress in his arms. He realized that most of his career as an animal trainer had been a mistake and that dolphins have as much right to freedom as humans. He vowed not to rest until he freed every last dolphin that could be returned to the wild successfully.

This is a true story that will move not only animal lovers but everyone who loves a well-told tale. He began to understand that dolphins were easy to train because of their great intelligence, not his great talent, and keeping them in captivity was cruel and morally wrong. While research and entertainment are important to human life, they are not worth the cost to these beautiful and gentle animals.

O'Barry was arrested trying to free a dolphin, but that didn’t stop him, and he now devotes his life to untraining dolphins and returning them to their natural habitats. Once the pride of the billion-dollar dolphin captivity industry, he has since become its nemesis.”

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To coincide with discovery​‘s #SharkWeek, episode 18 of #Ponderlust was a conversation about sharks: how realistic the threat in the wake of the most recent incidents off the Carolina coasts? Are the media networks portraying shark attacks and information about the animal accurately? What are the consequences of misinformation surrounding sharks? And what ever happened to the educational, scientifically-valid Discovery Channel programs we all used to tune in for? 

Dive in as we discuss everyone’s favorite apex predator of the deep…

Sharks are beautiful animals, and if you’re lucky enough to see lots of them, that means that you’re in a healthy ocean. You should be afraid if you are in the ocean and don’t see sharks.
– Sylvia Earle, Oceanographer

Originally posted by musts

What are your favorite shark facts? We’d love to hear them and share yours on the podcast, so write to us by sending us a message on Twitter, Facebook, or here on Tumblr using the tag #WhyILoveScience!


This podcast episode was inspired by our Tumblr post about #SharkWeek you can read via the link below: 

http://endeavorist.tumblr.com/post/123656157660/once-upon-a-time-discovery-channel-used-to

Like this episode? Don’t forget to subscribe to our YouTube Channel, and send us your comments or podcast suggestions to @EndeavoristOrg with the tag #Ponderlust!

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Pygmy Seahorses: Masters of Camouflage

If you were to ask me “Hey Joe, what are pygmy seahorses masters of?” then of course my answer would be “CUTENESS!!!” I had no idea that they were also connoisseurs of camo.

But scientists had never asked how these diminutive deceivers were able to match their knobby host corals so closely. This video, the first in a new series called Deep Look from KQED, tells the story of how California Academy of Sciences researchers put their adorable little hiding ability to the test. 

The results are not only an awesome bit of science, the close-up shots of this micro-marine world are just beautiful to behold. 

Also, BABY PYGMY SEAHORSES.

This new YouTube series looks like it’s gonna be really cool! Check out Deep Look.