marine corps

Rules For A Gunfight by Drill Instructor Joe B. Fricks, USMC

1. Forget about knives, bats and fists. Bring a gun. Preferably, bring at least two guns. Bring all of your friends who have guns. Bring four times the ammunition you think you could ever need.

2. Anything worth shooting is worth shooting twice. Ammunition is cheap – life is expensive. If you shoot inside, buckshot is your friend. A new wall is cheap – funerals are expensive.

3. Only hits count. The only thing worse than a miss is a slow miss.

4. If your shooting stance is good, you’re probably not moving fast enough or using cover correctly.

5. Move away from your attacker and go to cover. Distance is your friend. (Bulletproof cover and diagonal or lateral movement are preferred.)

6. If you can choose what to bring to a gunfight, bring a semi or full-automatic long gun and a friend with a long gun.

7. In ten years nobody will remember the details of caliber, stance, or tactics. They will only remember who lived.

8. If you are not shooting, you should be communicating, reloading, and running. Yell “Fire!” Why “Fire”? Cops will come with the Fire Department, sirens often scare off the bad guys, or at least cause then to lose concentration and will…. and who is going to summon help if you yell ”Intruder,” “Glock” or “Winchester?”

9. Accuracy is relative: most combat shooting standards will be more dependent on “pucker factor” than the inherent accuracy of the gun.

10. Someday someone may kill you with your own gun, but they should have to beat you to death with it because it is empty.

11. Always cheat, always win. The only unfair fight is the one you lose.

12. Have a plan.

13. Have a back-up plan, because the first one won’t work. “No battle plan ever survives 10 seconds past first contact with an enemy.”

14. Use cover or concealment as much as possible, but remember, sheetrock walls and the like stop nothing but your pulse when bullets tear through them.

15. Flank your adversary when possible. Protect yours.

16. Don’t drop your guard.

17. Always tactical load and threat scan 360 degrees. Practice reloading one-handed and off-hand shooting. That’s how you live if hit in your “good” side.

18. Watch their hands. Hands kill. Smiles, frowns and other facial expressions don’t (In God we trust. Everyone else keep your hands where I can see them.)

19. Decide NOW to always be aggressive ENOUGH, quickly ENOUGH.

20. The faster you finish the fight, the less shot you will get.

21. Be polite. Be professional. But, have a plan to kill everyone you meet if necessary, because they may want to kill you.

22. Be courteous to everyone, overly friendly to no one.

23. Your number one option for personal security is a lifelong commitment to avoidance, deterrence, and de-escalation.

24. Do not attend a gunfight with a handgun, the caliber of which does not start with anything smaller than ”4″.

25. Use a gun that works EVERY TIME. “All skill is in vain when an Angel blows the powder from the flintlock of your musket.” At a practice session, throw your gun into the mud, then make sure it still works. You can clean it later.

26. Practice shooting in the dark, with someone shouting at you, when out of breath, etc.

27. Regardless of whether justified or not, you will feel sad about killing another human being. It is better to be sad than to be room temperature.

28. The only thing you EVER say afterwards is, “He said he was going to kill me. I believed him. I’m sorry, Officer, but I’m very upset now. I can’t say anything more. Please speak with my attorney.”

Finally, Drill Instructor Frick’s Rules For Un-armed Combat.

1: Never be unarmed.

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Secretary of Defense Mattis Makes Surprise Visit to Afghanistan After Deadly Taliban Rampage on Afghan Military Base

(U.S. Defense Secretary James Mattis looks out over Kabul as he arrives via helicopter at Resolute Support headquarters on April 24, 2017, in in Kabul, Afghanistan. Mattis is on a regional tour of the Middle East. )

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The Indestructible Jack Lucas,

In 1942 Jacklyn H. Lucas enlisted in the Marine Corps, not an unusual thing to do during World War II, but certainly unusual at the age of 14.  A boy who looked much older than his years, Lucas claimed he was 17, forged his mother’s signature, and was inducted into the Corps no questions asked.  Jack Lucas underwent Marine Corps training at Parris Island and qualified as a sharpshooter and heavy machine gunner.  However after training, Lucas was sent from one menial assignment to the next, first in the lower 48, then at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii.

By 1945 Lucas was becoming bored with peaceful service, and on January 10th he went AWOL and stowed away on a ship bound for Iwo Jima.  Despite going AWOL, Lucas was given a combat assignment and attached to the 5th Marine Division.

Upon hitting the beaches Lucas and his fellow Marines were sprayed with murderous Japanese gunfire.  Perhaps the only Marine to invade Iwo Jima unarmed, Lucas immediately picked up a rifle and returned fire. During the battle, it was his squad’s duty to clear out a machine gun nest near a deep ravine.  It was then that a grenade landed in the middle of his squad.  Without thinking, Lucas leaped upon the grenade, determined to use his body as shield to protect his comrades.  Then another grenade landed nearby.  Lucas grabbed that grenade as well, and stuffed it under his torso.  When the two grenades exploded his body was thrown into the air.  Amazingly, Lucas was still alive, though seriously wounded.  Covered from head to toe with shrapnel wounds, Lucas was evacuated to a hospital ship.  Over the next seven months of recovery, Lucas would undergo 21 surgeries to remove 250 pieces of shrapnel from his body.  He was awarded the Medal of Honor for his actions (the youngest Marine to receive the award), as well as the Bronze Star and Purple Heart.

After the war, Jack Lucas returned home, resumed his education as a ninth grader, graduated high school, and graduated college with a business degree.  He married three times.  His marriage with his second wife didn’t go so well, as she hired a hitman to kill him.  Fortunately he was able to fend off the attack.

In 1961, he rejoined the military, this time joining the US Army and becoming a paratrooper so that he could “conquer his fear of heights”.  During a training jump, his two parachutes failed to open, and he fell 3,500 feet before slamming into the ground.  Miraculously, despite screaming to the earth at terminal velocity, Lucas walked away from the accident unscathed.  From 1961 to 1965, Lucas served as a paratrooper with the 82nd Airborne.  When he finally retired he had risen to the rank of captain.

Jack Lucas died of Leukemia in 2008 at the age of 80.  His Medal of Honor and citation is currently sealed within the hull of the USS Iwo Jima.

Marine Corps releases first video featuring a woman recruit in the lead

  • Amid backlash over treatment of women in its ranks, the United States Marine Corps released its first-ever national commercial featuring a female recruit, according to the Associated Press
  • The ad, titled “Battle Up,” published on YouTube Friday. It follows a woman from childhood, when she breaks up a group of girls bullying another student; through adolescence, as she fights her way down a rugby pitch; to her career as a Marine, in combat and serving the homeless. 
  • Notably, the ad’s star is an actual Marine — Capt. Erin Demchko, who spoke to the AP about the experience of filming. 
  • “Everything felt different with all the staff and cameras,” Demchko, a deputy commander at Camp Courtney in Okinawa, Japan, who previously served in Afghanistan, recalled. The ad, she explained, “is targeted at young women who are seeking a way to challenge themselves.” Read more. (5/14/2017 1:00 PM)
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Around 100 Marines from my area, of 3/5, took time off of their 96 hour liberty to go back up to 1Sgt’s Hill and place over 2 dozen crosses back to their rightful spot.

Orginally about a week ago, 4 Marines and 2 US Navy Corpsman went up the hill because the fire in Camp Pendleton was spreading pretty well all over the base. They made it just in time, taking down the last cross before the fire (only 30 ft away now) engulfed the rest of 1Sgt’s Hill.

The Marines vowed that they would get the crosses back up at the end of the week and stuck to it, restoring one of the most beloved memorial us Marines have.

U.S. Marine Corps Maj. Kurt Chew-Een Lee was the first U.S. Marine Corps officer of Chinese descent. During the Korean War, Lee, a Marine Corps Lieutenant back then, and his platoon were facing Chinese troops aiding the North Korean forces. He drew fire to himself and yelled phrased in Mandarin, confusing the enemy troops, which led to his unit’s victory despite being outnumbered. For his heroism, he received the Navy Cross, the Silver Star, and two purple hearts, and he passed away on March 3, 2014.

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This probably won’t go far, but I’m trying to reach as many people as possible in hopes of getting the attention of Avenged Sevenfold. My husband and I were supposed to go to their July 9th concert, and he was so excited about it. He was a marine who has always, always been a huge fan of them. It kills me to know that he won’t be physically there to see it. If you guys can help me, maybe it will get far enough to reach them. It would mean the world to him if they could dedicate one song to him during their Atlanta concert. Just one song, just one mention of his name… He would be so happy.

Please reblog if you can…

“Khe Sanh, South Vietnam, March 1968: US Navy Hospital Corpsman Theodore Rutkowski of Pittsburgh lies on the ground just outside of Khe Sanh’s outer defenses and uses a stethoscope to listen for signs of Viet Cong tunneling beneath the beleaguered base. Covering him is US Marine Julian Kalama of San Lorenzo, Calif.”

Photographed by John Olson for Stars and Stripes

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I managed to catch the Marine Corps West Expo today over on main side of Camp Pendleton.

A lot of cool new gear and vehicles were on display for us to check out.

The tacks still look uncomfortable as hell but the JLTVs that Oshkosh is producing look and feel outstanding.

They are 100× more comfortable then HMMWVs and the accessories were great to see. They even have cup holders and working A/C!