marine biology

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Giant squids might be even bigger than we realized

According to research from Charles Paxton, fisheries ecologist and statistician at Scotland’s University of St. Andrews, published in the Journal of Zoology this month, the giant squid could grow to reach as much as 65 feet. But even that is a “conservative analysis,” as size could protect against their #1 predator.

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Did you know? When octopuses are caught in the act of moving rocks and destroying the hard work of their aquarists, they drop everything and slowly back away like nothing happened.

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closely related to sharks but with long, flat bodies and wing-like pectoral fins, mobula rays are ideally suited to swooping through the water - here off the gulf of california - yet seem equally at home in the air, so much so that they have earned the name “flying rays”. mobula rays can reach heights of more than two metres, remaining airborne for several seconds. 

mobula rays are quite elusive and difficult to study, so biologists are not quite sure why they jump out of the water. theories vary from a means of communication, to a mating ritual (though both males and females jump), or as a way to shed themselves of parasites. they could also be jumping as a way of better corralling their pray, as seen with them swimming in a circular formation. 

what is known about mobula rays is that they reach sexual maturity late and their investment in their offspring is more akin to mammals than other fishes, usually producing just a single pup after long pregnancies, all of which makes them extremely vulnerable to commercial fishing, especially as a species that likes to come together in large groups.

flickr

Freshwater stingrays by Aaron Gustafson
Via Flickr:
Potamotrygon henlei on the left, Potamotrygon magdalenae on the right.

Happy Valentine’s Day my marine bio lovelies!

I give you, all the above! Shark Love!

Instead of something cheesy to give your admirer, why not make a donation to your favourite conservation group? Show them you care not only about them, but the marine environment too!

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Now that’s what I call a short stack! 🥞Smaller rays often love claiming on top of larger ones, even attempting to ride them! Bisquick doesn’t seem to mind too much fortunately. As always I do have to remind everyone that freshwater stingrays are venomous animals that grow to very large sizes and should not be kept by the average hobbyist.

Wonderful Comb Jellies

Comb jellies or ctenophora are marine invertebrates that looks like jellyfishes and swims using their combs or large cilia. They are the largest animals who use cilia for locomotion.

Comb jellies are bioluminent. They can produce light.

The above photo shows a comb jelly that belongs to the baroe family. Look at the “combs” of the creature. These are cilia.

It’s a blood belly comb jelly.

This comb jelly is known as sea gooseberry. Why? Look at the photo below to know:

Comb jellies does not have a brain or central nervous system just like a jellyfish.

Comb jellies are voracious eaters. They eat zooplankton. Here is a antarctic ocean ctenophore is eating a krill.