marie-curie-quotes

Humanity certainly needs practical men, who get the most out of their work, and, without forgetting the general good, safeguard their own interests. But humanity also needs dreamers, for whom the disinterested development of an enterprise is so captivating that it becomes impossible for them to devote their care to their own material profit. Without the slightest doubt, these dreamers do not deserve wealth, because they do not desire it. Even so, a well-organised society should assure to such workers the efficient means of accomplishing their task, in a life freed from material care and freely consecrated to research.
—  Marie Curie
Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.
—  Marie Curie
For example, the math SAT used to have a section that required students not to solve a problem but to determine if they had enough information to solve it. Women did very well on this type of problem, better than men. But the Educational Testing Service, which develops and administers the SAT, eliminated the section, claiming that it was too easily coached. As Susan F. Chipman, a cognitive psychologist at the U.S. Office of Naval Research, writes, however, ‘In any case, the historical fact that the Educational Testing Service chose to drop a class of items that consistently favored females from a test that consistently favors males should cast doubt on the tendency to treat the SAT as if it were some gold standard of mathematical ability.’
—  Linley Erin Hall, Who’s Afraid of Marie Curie?
Nothing in life is to be feared, it is only to be understood. Now is the time to understand more, so that we may fear less.
—  Marie Curie (November 7, 1867 – July 4, 1934) was a Polish physicist and chemist famous for her pioneering research on radioactivity. She was the first person honored with two Nobel Prizes—in physics and chemistry. She was the first female professor at the University of Paris, and in 1995 became the first woman to be entombed on her own merits in the Panthéon in Paris.