marie adelaide of savoy

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The title of “Dauphine of France,” was given to the wife of the heir-apparent to the French Throne.

The following are Dauphines of France married to members of the House of Bourbon:

Duchess Maria Anna Victoria of Bavaria - Became Dauphine upon her marriage to Louis “Le Grand Dauphin”, eldest son and heir of Louis XIV, on March 7th, 1680. She never became Queen, dying on April 20th, 1690.

Princess Marie Adelaide of Savoy - Was the wife of Louis, “Le Petit Dauphin”. She would become Dauphine on April 14th, 1711, after the death of her husband’s father “Le Grand Dauphin.” She would never be Queen, dying of measles on February 12th, 1712.

Infanta Maria Teresa Rafaela of Spain - She was the first wife of Louis Ferdinand, eldest son of Louis XV, and became Dauphine upon their marriage on February 23rd, 1745. She never became Queen, as she died the following year, on July 22nd, 1746, a few days after giving birth to a short lived laughter.

Princess Maria Josepha of Saxony - Was the second wife of Louis Ferdinand, marrying him and becoming Dauphine on February 9th, 1747. She outlived her husband, who died before he could become King on December 20th, 1765.

Archduchess Maria Antonia of Austria - The wife of Louis Auguste, she became Dauphine upon their marriage on May 16th, 1770. She became Queen on May 10th, 1774, when her husband’s grandfather died, and he took the throne as Louis XVI.

Princess Marie Therese Charlotte of France - She was married to her cousin, Louis Antoine, and became Dauphine on September 16th, 1824, when his father took the throne as Charles X. I. She would briefly be Queen on August 2nd, 1830, during the 20 minute interval between the time Charles X abdicated and her husband signed the same document.

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On February 15th, 1710, the boy who would someday become Louis XV was born.

He was the third child and third son born to Louis, Duke of Burgundy, and Marie Adelaide of Savoy. He was given the traditional title of “Duke of Anjou” at his birth.

Born during the reign of his great-grandfather, Louis XIV, it would have been considered highly unlikely that he would see the throne. His grandfather, father, and surviving elder brother were all in line ahead of him.

A year after he was born, his grandfather suddenly died and his father became the new Dauphin of France. A year after that, his mother contracted smallpox and died, with his father following soon after. Both the Duke of Anjou, and his brother, the Duke of Brittany, were also infected with the disease.  

The Duke of Brittany was treated with repeated bloodlettings to try and save him, but the treatment was not successful and he died after having been Dauphin for all of three weeks. Louis himself was looked after by his Governess, Madame de Ventadour, whose carefull looking after of him and her refusal to allow the same bloodletting treatment on him is credited as the reason he survived.

These multiple and sudden deaths left the young Louis, now Dauphin of France himself at just two years old, as the heir to his great-grandfather. Soon after, he would become King of France as Louis XV at the age of 5, when the Louis XIV died after a record setting reign of over 72 years.

Louis would reign for an impressive nearly 59 years himself, dying at the age of 64, and was succeeded by his eldest surviving grandson, Louis Auguste, who would reign as Louis XVI.

On February 15th, 1710, the boy who would someday become Louis XV was born.

He was the third child and third son born to Louis, Duke of Burgundy, and Marie Adelaide of Savoy. He was given the traditional title of “Duke of Anjou” at his birth.

Born during the reign of his great-grandfather, the infamous Louis XIV, it was highly unlikely that little Louis would see the throne. His grandfather, father, and surviving elder brother were all in line ahead of him.

A year after his birth though, his grandfather suddenly died and his father became the new Dauphin of France. A year after that, his mother contracted smallpox and died, with his father following soon after. He and his brother, the Duke of Brittany, were also infected with the disease. 

The Duke of Brittany was treated with repeated bloodlettings to try and save him, but to no avail. Louis himself was looked after by his Governess, Madame de Ventadour, whose care and refusal to allow the same treatment on him is credited as the reason he survived.

These deaths left young Louis, now Dauphin of France himself and only two years old, as the heir to his great-grandfather. Soon after, he would become King as Louis XV at the age of 5, when the Sun King died after a record setting reign of over 72 years.