marichou

© Addie Mannan Photography
Model: Helen Marichal
Hair and MUA: Whitneys Hair Design for Dark Beauty Magazine

anonymous asked:

For the baseball questions: 9, 17, 24

9. Favorite number on a player

I honestly don’t have a huge attachment to numbers. Probably Posey’s 28 though, because my son Louis Tomlinson also has that number and it amazes me how he and one of the best players on the Giants share the same jersey number. Or Roberto Kelly’s 39 because that was my dream jersey number

17. Favorite bromance

Mad Bum and Huddy

24. Favorite retired player

Willie Mays, my favorite for everything. And Juan Marichal

thanks!

Up to date MAY 21, 2015 1:58a ET When Tim Lincecum struck out Adrian Gonzalez to finish the sixth inning on Wednesday night time, he moved into third place on the Giants’ all-time strikeouts record. Lincecum handed Carl Hubbell together with his 1,680th Okay. Forward of Lincecum are Amos Rusie (1,838), Juan Marichal (2,281) and […]

The news Lincecum passes Hubbell on Giants’ all-time strikeout record appeared first on America Sport News!.

Historical Events

1960 – Juan Marichal debuts as SF Giant pitcher, beats Phillies on 1 hitter
1973 – 99th Preakness: Ron Turcotte aboard Secretariat wins in 1:54.4
1979 – 105th Preakness: Ron Franklin aboard Spectacular Bid wins in 1:54.2
1981 – Pirate Jim Bibby gives up a leadoff single to Brave Terry Harper, then retires next 27 batters
1982 – Sophia Loren jailed in Naples for tax evasion
1984 – Pat LaFontaine scores 2 goals within 22 sec in an NHL playoff game

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1874 – Gilbert Laird Jessop, cricketer (The Croucher)
1909 – Schlomo Joffe, composer
1930 – Hans Kox, composer
1939 – James Fox, actor (The Servant), born in London, England
1948 – Jean-Pierre Haignere, France, cosmonaut (Soyuz TM-17)
1966 – Marc Bureau, Trois Rivieres, NHL center (Montreal Canadiens)

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1610 – Thomas Sanchez, Spanish theologian (b. 1550)
1904 – Auguste Molinier, French historian (b. 1851)
1998 – Sōsuke Uno, Japanese prime minister (b. 1922)
2001 – Susannah McCorkle, American singer (b. 1946)
2002 – John Gorton, nineteenth Prime Minister of Australia (b. 1911)
2002 – Walter Lord, American writer (b. 1917)

More Famous Deaths »

from Today in History | HistoryOrb.com http://ift.tt/15YosHW

The post Today in History for 19th May 2015 appeared first on Crafty Puzzles.

Today in History for 19th May 2015

Historical Events

1960 - Juan Marichal debuts as SF Giant pitcher, beats Phillies on 1 hitter1973 - 99th Preakness: Ron Turcotte aboard Secretariat wins in 1:54.41979 - 105th Preakness: Ron Franklin aboard Spectacular Bid wins in 1:54.21981 - Pirate Jim Bibby gives up a leadoff single to Brave Terry Harper, then retires next 27 batters1982 - Sophia Loren jailed in Naples for tax evasion1984 - Pat LaFontaine scores 2 goals within 22 sec in an NHL playoff game

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1874 - Gilbert Laird Jessop, cricketer (The Croucher)1909 - Schlomo Joffe, composer1930 - Hans Kox, composer1939 - James Fox, actor (The Servant), born in London, England1948 - Jean-Pierre Haignere, France, cosmonaut (Soyuz TM-17)1966 - Marc Bureau, Trois Rivieres, NHL center (Montreal Canadiens)

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1610 - Thomas Sanchez, Spanish theologian (b. 1550)1904 - Auguste Molinier, French historian (b. 1851)1998 - Sōsuke Uno, Japanese prime minister (b. 1922)2001 - Susannah McCorkle, American singer (b. 1946)2002 - John Gorton, nineteenth Prime Minister of Australia (b. 1911)2002 - Walter Lord, American writer (b. 1917)

More Famous Deaths »

Today in History for 19th May 2015

Historical Events

1960 - Juan Marichal debuts as SF Giant pitcher, beats Phillies on 1 hitter
1973 - 99th Preakness: Ron Turcotte aboard Secretariat wins in 1:54.4
1979 - 105th Preakness: Ron Franklin aboard Spectacular Bid wins in 1:54.2
1981 - Pirate Jim Bibby gives up a leadoff single to Brave Terry Harper, then retires next 27 batters
1982 - Sophia Loren jailed in Naples for tax evasion
1984 - Pat LaFontaine scores 2 goals within 22 sec in an NHL playoff game

More Historical Events »

Famous Birthdays

1874 - Gilbert Laird Jessop, cricketer (The Croucher)
1909 - Schlomo Joffe, composer
1930 - Hans Kox, composer
1939 - James Fox, actor (The Servant), born in London, England
1948 - Jean-Pierre Haignere, France, cosmonaut (Soyuz TM-17)
1966 - Marc Bureau, Trois Rivieres, NHL center (Montreal Canadiens)

More Famous Birthdays »

Famous Deaths

1610 - Thomas Sanchez, Spanish theologian (b. 1550)
1904 - Auguste Molinier, French historian (b. 1851)
1998 - Sōsuke Uno, Japanese prime minister (b. 1922)
2001 - Susannah McCorkle, American singer (b. 1946)
2002 - John Gorton, nineteenth Prime Minister of Australia (b. 1911)
2002 - Walter Lord, American writer (b. 1917)

More Famous Deaths »

MLB Franchise Four - San Francisco Giants

With Major League Baseball honoring the “Franchise Four” of each respective franchise during this year’s upcoming All-Star game, I will present my own franchise four for each team, as well as pioneers, negro leagues, and greatest living players. Today, we have the San Francisco Giants.

This is one of the final great franchises that I’ll get to cover as we inch closer to the end of this series. The Giants are one of those franchises that played a monumental role in shaping this league into what it is today. This ballot represents the franchise so well, nearly spanning it’s entire history from 1900 until 2015. There are a couple of honorable mentions I want to point out, the first being Bill Terry, who is a write-in. Terry spent his entire 14-year playing career with the New York Giants. In 1932, still a star player, he took over as manager following John McGraw’s retirement. He would spend the next nine years as Giants manager. Terry ranks in the top five of most hitting categories in Giants history. Hitting ,401 in 1930, he remains the last National League player to finish with a .400 batting average. With a .341 lifetime average, he is the franchise leader.  Mel Ott was one of the final cuts from the franchise four list. Another player-manager, Ott was a 12-time all-star, a six-time NL home run champion, an NL RBI champion, and a World Series champion. He was the youngest player in history to reach 100 home runs, and he was the first NL player to hit 500 home runs. Playing his entire 22-year career with the Giants, he retired a career .304 hitter, just missing out on 3000 hits but blasting over 500 home runs. He is the franchise leader in RBI with 1,860. Willie McCovey spent 19 of his 22 Major League years in San Fran. Although he only played 52 games in his rookie year of 1959, he was awarded the Rookie of the Year Award. He made his first all-star team four years later when he hit 44 home runs and drove in 102 runs. After stringing a couple of all-star seasons in a row, he won the MVP award in 1969. That season saw him hit 45 homers, drive in 126 RBI and lead the league in slugging percentage, OPS, and OBP. It was all part of the reputation that he earned as the scariest hitter of his day. McCovey’s 16 grand slams are a franchise record. He was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1986 on his first ballot. I suppose I should mention Barry Bonds as an honorable mention at least. The all-time home run king was one of the most disliked players of all time, but he has earned his reputation through the mounting evidence that he used steroids. His steroid use may very well be the most known, yet unproven fact in Major League history. Nevertheless, Bonds’ 17 years with the Giants proved to be one of the most successful a player has ever had. He won the NL MVP in his first year on the team, and would later win four consecutive awards from 2001 to 2004. He is the franchise’s all-time leader walks, intentional walks, OPS, slugging percentage and on-base percentage. Bonds hasn’t come close to election to the hall of fame through three years of eligibility, and might never get in.

I’m going to start with the Christian Gentleman himself, Mr. Christy Mathewson. Spending 17 seasons with the New York Giants, Matty won two pitching triple crowns, four NL wins titles, five NL ERA titles, five NL strikeout titles, pitched two no-hitters, and won two World Series championships. He was one of the greatest World Series hurlers of all time, pitching 101.2 innings and giving up just 11 runs in 11 starts, including three complete game shutouts in the 1905 series. Mathewson won 373 games during his career, a Giants & National League record. He also holds the franchise records for innings, games started, complete games, strikeouts, and shutouts. After retiring in 1916, he was manager of the Cincinnati Reds for a couple of years before enlisting in the army for World War 1. He was accidentally gassed during training in France was developed tuberculosis. The illness eventually took his life in 1925. He was a member of the first Hall of Fame class.

An argument can be made that Willie Mays was the greatest player of all time, and is certainly the greatest living player. Spending almost his entire 22-year career with the New York/ San Francisco Giants, he was a 24-time all-star, a 12-time Gold Glove winner, two-time all-star game MVP, NL Rookie of the Year, two-time NL MVP, and a World Series champion. The Say Hey Kid is only one of five National League players to record 100 RBI in eight consecutive years, and his 10-year span between 50 home run seasons is the longest in Major League history. He also went 11 years between MVP awards, finishing in the top five of MVP voting six times in between. He starred in one of the most famous plays in Major League Baseball history when he made an over-the-shoulder catch in game 1 of the 1954 World Series at the Polo Grounds. In 1999, The Sporting News ranked him the second greatest baseball player of all time, He leads the franchise in games played, runs, plate appearances, at bats, hits, total bases, singles, doubles, and home runs. He was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his first year of eligibility, shockingly with only 94.7% of the votes. Who the heck didn’t vote for Willie Mays?

One of my fellow Dominicans, Juan Marichal, is the third member of this franchise four. He was Willie Mays’ teammate for over 13 seasons, developing into an ace. A 10-time all-star, he was the MVP of the 1965 version of the game. He won 20 games or more in six different seasons, including a personal-best 26 wins in 1968. In 1963, he took part in what is now known as “The Greatest Game Ever Pitched”. Marichal was on the mound as his Giants hosted the Milwaukee Brewers, who sent fellow Hall-of-Famer Warren Spahn to the mound. With all-time greats like Willie Mays and Hank Aaron playing, the two pitching aces matched zeroes all the way until the 16th inning, when Willie Mays hit a walk off home run. Juan Marichal was elected to the Hall of Fame in his third ballot, and it is widely believed that his incident with Johnny Roseboro and the Los Angeles Dodgers is the reason why. The Giants retired his number in 1975.

For the final member of this quarter, I looked beyond the ballot and found Carl Hubbell. The lefty spent his entire 16-year career with the New York Giants from 1928 to 1943. Between 1936 and 1937, he won 24 consecutive games, a Major League record. The nine-time all-star’s best stretch came from 1933 to 1937, when he won 20 games or more each season. His 1933 season saw him win 23 games and pitch to a 1.66 ERA, deemed good enough to win the National League MVP award. Three years later he’d win the MVP again, winning 26 games and pitching to a 2.31 ERA, becoming the first unanimous selection in history.  He led the league in wins and ERA on three separate occasions. Going two innings further than Marichal, he pitched 18 innings against the St. Louis Cardinals in a game in 1933. While he achieved many fine feats in his day, Hubbell is best known for the 1934 all-star game, held in his home stadium the Polo Grounds. Hubbell struck out Babe Ruth, Lou Gehrig, Jimmie Foxx, Al Simmons, and Joe Cronin in succession. No other pitcher has achieved this at an all-star game, let alone to do it to five future Hall of Famers. He was inducted to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1947.

Top 10 Unique Pitching Motions

#Top10 Unique Pitching Motions

http://gty.im/81300535

Many baseball “downers” think pitching is rather easy. You stand on top of a mound of dirt, you raise your leg, rear back and let one fly.

But of course, that is the furthest thing from being true. Pitching is an art of its own, a complicated combination of specificly timed movements that involves multiple body parts working together in unison to throw a ball 60 feet 6…

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Soljenitsyne. L'archipel du goulag. T1/3. Édition du Seuil. Traduction Mme Jacqueline Lafond M José Johannet, René Marichal, Serge Oswald et Nikita Struve.

DGCINE está presente en Festival de Cannes 2015

DGCINE está presente en Festival de Cannes 2015

Por tercer año consecutivo la Dirección General de Cine (DGCINE) ha estado presente en el Festival de Cannes, donde su directora Yvette Marichal ha popularizado el lema “Let us tell you how easy it is to film in paradise”, en clara alusión de resaltar las ventajas y virtudes que ofrece República Dominicana en términos de filmaciones. Conjuntamente al festival, se realiza el Marché du Film, donde…

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Obra Teatral 'El Adiestramiento' Cierra 56to Festival de Teatro Puertorriqueño del ICP

Obra Teatral #ElAdiestramiento Cierra 56to Festival de Teatro Puertorriqueño del @ICPPR - via TVOrriola

San Juan, Puerto Rico — El viernes 22 de mayo a las 8:00 p.m. sube a escena la pieza teatral El adiestramiento, de la dramaturga puertorriqueña Tere Marichal, en el Teatro Victoria Espinosa. Esta obra pondrá fin al 56to Festival de Teatro Puertorriqueño del Instituto de Cultura Puertorriqueña que inició en el mes de marzo. Para la puesta en escena, la obra cuenta con actuaciones de primer orden.…

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WORLD BASEBALL HALL OF FAME  SELECTS NEXT 12 INDUCTEES.

WORLD BASEBALL HALL OF FAME SELECTS NEXT 12 INDUCTEES.

Toronto, May 19, 2015.

The Class of 2015 remarkable ball players, are joining the original 12 Honored Members, Babe Ruth, Hank Aaron, Sadaharu Oh, Roberto Clemente, Ferguson Jenkins, Juan Marichal, Shigeo Nagashima, Bobby Avila, Minnie Minoso, Viktor Starffin, Albert Spalding and Harry Wright.

Class of 2015.

1. Jackie Robinson. 10 year MLB. .301, 137 hrs. 734 rbi’s 197 sb.
   The man who brought major league baseball into the modern area by breaking the
   baseball color barrier with the Brooklyn Dodgers.

2. Ted Williams. 19 year MLB. .344, 521 hrs. 1839 rbi’s, 6 batting titles, 2 MVP, 4 hr
   titles, last player to bat 400, 406 in 1941.
   Considered the by many the greatest hitter in baseball. US Navy fighter pilot in 2
   world wars, WW2 and Korea. A Boston Red Sox Legend

3.  Mickey Mantle. 18 years MLB. .291, 536 hrs, 2781 rbi’s, 4 hr titles, 3MVP, 7 W/S,
    record 18 W/S home runs. Triple crown, 1956.
    A great Yankee. Most powerful switch hitter in baseball history. 565 foot home run.
     "The Mick". One of the 4 greatest Yankees of all time.

4.  Joe DiMaggio. 13 years MLB. .325, 361 hrs, 1537 rbi, 3 MVP, 9 W/S.
    A Yankee Legend. A great ball player, served in WW2. Left a 56 game hitting
    streak for the rest of Major League players to chase.

5.  Cy Young. 22 years MLB. 511 wins, 2:63 era, 2803 s.o, 3 nh, 1 perfect game.
    749 complete games
    A master on the mound, and a total win record that will never be broken.

6.  Lou Gehrig. 17 years MLB. .340, 493 hrs, 1995 rbi, 6 W/S, 2 MVP, 3 hr titles,
    triple crown 1934.
    “ Today, I consider myself, the luckiest man on the face of the earth”. A man
    who left us too soon, a great ball player, who became “the Pride of the Yankees”.

7.  Rod Carew.
    Gatun, Canal Zone, Panama.
    18 years MLB. .328, 92 hr, 3053 hits, 1015 rbi, 7 batting titles, 4 consecutive.

8.  Nolan Ryan.
    27 years MLB. 324 wins, 3.19 era, 5,714 SO, 7 no hitters, more strike outs than
    innings pitched. Regularly threw fastball 100 mph, devastating  curve ball.
    Phenomenal pitching career, known as the “Ryan Express”.
9.  Omar Linares. “El Nino” the kid.
    San Juan, Martinez, Cuba.
    20 year career, .368, 404 hrs, 1547 rbi, 264 SB. One of the best ever in Cuba.

10. Dennis Martinez. Granada, Nicaragua.
     15 years MLB. 245 wins, 3.70 era, 2149 S.O.  Perfect game with the Montreal
     Expos, 1991. Known as “El Presidente.”  

11. Martin Dihigo. Cidra, Cuba.
     28 year career. .307, no hr record, 4 MVP, Pitching record  107 wins. Negro
     Leagues, Latin American League. Member, Cuban and Cooperstown Halls of
     Fame.

12.  Pete Rose. “Charlie Hustle”.
      24 years MLB. .307, 4,255 hits, 3 batting titles, MVP, 3 W/S.
      Most hits in major league history, played every position except pitcher
      or catcher. Manger Cincinnati Reds 1984 - 1989.
      Banned from baseball by MLB in 1989 for gambling on baseball games.

World Baseball Hall of Fame induction event planned for later this year.

Contacts;  Bruce Prentice                     Alexander Cartwright lV
                President                              Board of Governors
                905 397 6817                       253 640 6039
                         World Baseball Hall of Fame