march 1967

10

Happy 50th Birthday, Lauren Helen Graham! (March 16th, 1967) ✨

Life doesn’t often spell things out for you or give you what you want exactly when you want it, otherwise it wouldn’t be called life, it would be called vending machine. It’s hard to say exactly when it will happen, and it’s true that whatever you’re after may not drop down the moment you spend all your quarters, but someday soon a train is coming. In fact, it may already be on the way. You just don’t know it yet.

anonymous asked:

Can you give some information on Jonghyun and his family and growing up? I've always wondered

these are just some bits of information on his childhood / family. he told a lot of predebut stories when blue night radio was still airing which you can read through at the link!

family

1) he has one sibling: an older sister named sodam. even though it’s hard to find the original quotation she was apparently born in 1988, making her around two years older than jonghyun and around twenty nine. she was born when their mom was twenty one. she’s a well known shinhwa changjo and has a job working within the cosmetics industry, based on a comment jonghyun made a year or two back but that could’ve changed by now.

2) his mom is named lee eun kyung. she was born on march 1st, 1967 making her fifty years old (in international age). she’s a christian (and sodam seems to be as well, though jonghyun is non-religious). jonghyun has mentioned the many jobs that his mom held in the past in order to keep their family above water, including (but not limited to): selling stickers at a stationary shop and being the principal of a daycare center. she went back to university late in life where she studied both women’s and children’s psychology and now works as a psychosocial therapist.

3) his grandmother was a haenyeo which is a female sea diver that works exclusively within or around jeju island. they’re often referred to as mermaids in korea and prided for being independent / highly determined / having iron and strong will, and are representative of the semi-matriarchal structure of family on jeju island.

4) he once said that he has a lot of older female cousins and that, as a child, he’d refer to them as “unnie” rather than “noona”.

5) to give a response about his dad: he’s not really in the picture and, though jonghyun has never confirmed it, it’s very likely that his parents are divorced and have been for awhile now. i once responded to a question about this, but it seems that jonghyun’s relationship with him is either extremely strained or nonexistent. he never mentions him when thanking his family for bringing him up (only his mom and sister). he has never been seen at any shinee or solo related event since debut, etc. any mention of him from jonghyun has been negative, such as: telling a story about how his dad was both against him partaking in a music career and attending a music school, and implying that he was a “bad” guy who dated women far too young for him in regards to his parents’ relationship. so, that’s really all that can be said about him.

childhood

1) jonghyun once said that his mom, sister and him used to play harmonica together during their spare time when he was in elementary school.

2) it’s been mentioned on various occasions under different circumstances but he used to practice taekwondo, kendo, etc. during his early childhood. he won a bronze medal in kendo once~.

3) his parents were married in 1994 when his mom was twenty seven, sodam was six and jonghyun was four. jonghyun once mentioned on blue night that, in their wedding video, he can be seen crying throughout the entire ceremony.

4) jonghyun revealed in late 2015 that his family was on welfare at least through his middle school years.

5) jonghyun once mentioned that his sister and him lived with his grandparents (on his mom’s side) for two years.

6) jonghyun once said that he doesn’t like thinking back on his childhood. when he was visiting his childhood home back in 2015 for monthly live connection he was quoted as saying: “i don’t want to think back or reminisce about my childhood memories. i have no good memories as i was in a period of storm and stress while living there”. he also said on the show that he doesn’t like looking at childhood pictures for the same reason, but you can view some baby photos of him here.

7) his “first love” was fellow classmate from his first year of elementary school. he basically followed her around like a puppy and wasn’t sure himself if it could be regarded as a “first love” or not.

8) he briefly wanted to be a police officer as a child. he then wanted to become a korean language teacher or writer before turning to music.

9) jonghyun once said that there was a period during his childhood where he was very sick often and it caused his mom a lot of stress. he’s also said that he used to get hurt quite a bit during elementary and middle school.

10) his parents briefly owned a record store very early on during his childhood.

11) he used to dye his fingernails different colors with his sister by using garden balsam as a child.

12) jonghyun attended an all boy’s middle school and then a christian high school named mount zion where he was part of a band named zion where he played the bass. it was through a performance with this band that sm scouted him to audition for the company (based on his visuals). he transferred from this school after becoming a trainee to attend the prestigious seoul music institute which he dropped out of before graduating. he later went on to receive his ged.

4

Sharon Tate, photographed by Caterine Milinaire during a bowling game for Vogue, which was printed in the March 1st, 1967 issue of the magazine

Other bowlers included:
Jane Holzer
Tina Sinatra
Adam West
Don Seld
Marisa Berenson
Trini Lopez
Arnaud de Rosnay

John grabbed my cover and held it so close to his eyes that I thought his nose would pierce it. And for the first time I spotted a slightly sheepish look on his face, as if he felt embarrassed that a stranger noticed his short-sightedness. And, apparently, he wasn’t prepared for me confronting him with this question. It only took John a second to switch back to the nonchalant, grumpy rocker and he said in a tight-lipped manner: ‘Go to Stuart… He’s the arty one.’ 

That was my first contact with the lads, and to be precise, it was already the first step towards John’s phone call, which wasn’t until six years later, when he asked me in the early summer of 1966: ‘Any idea for our next album cover?’

[Klaus Voormann, on broaching the subject of album cover design with John in Hamburg, 1960. From Revolver 50: Birth of an Icon.]


Genesis Publications has announced a Grammy Anniversary edition of Klaus Voormann’s book, Revolver 50: Birth of an Icon, limited to 450 copies. Klaus won a Grammy Award for the artwork on 2nd March 1967, the first of its kind for a rock album. 

Pic: Klaus Voormann

On March 29, 1967, around two p.m., John lennon came to Paul Mc- Cartney’s house in London, and they headed up to Paul’s workroom, a narrow, rectangular space full of instruments and amps and modern art. The day before, they’d started a new song, meant for Ringo Starr to sing. Today, they intended to  finish it off. Hunter Davies, a columnist with the Sunday Times, was on hand, and his account offers a rare window onto how John and Paul worked.
John took up his guitar, and Paul started noodling at the piano “for a couple of hours,” Davies wrote, “they both banged away. Each seemed to be in a trance until the other came up with something good, then he would pluck it out of a mass of noises and try it himself.”
“Are you afraid when you turn out the light?” John offered.
Paul repeated the line and nodded. They could begin each of the verses with a question, John suggested, and he gave another one.
“Do you believe in love at  first sight?”
He interrupted himself. “It hasn’t got the right number of syllables.”
He tried breaking the line between believe and in love, putting in a pause long enough to create the right rhythm. It didn’t work.
“How about,” Paul said, “Do you believe in a love at  first sight?”
John sang it and instantly added another line “Yes, I’m certain it happens all the time.”
They switched the order of the lines and sang them over and over again.
It was now  five o’clock. John’s wife came by with a friend. They talked about the lines to the song so far, and, in the midst of the chatter, John said — almost to himself — in answer to what’s seen when the light is out: “I know it’s mine.” someone said it sounded smutty.
They chatted some more. Paul started improvising on the piano before breaking into “Can’t Buy Me love.” John joined in, shouting and laughing. Then they both began to play “Tequila,” a 1958 hit by the Champs.
“Remember in Germany?” John said. “We used to shout out anything.” They did the song again, with John throwing in new words at the cres- cendo of each line: “knickers” and “Duke of Edinburgh” and “tit” and “Hitler”.
“They both stopped all the shouting and larking around as suddenly as they’d begun it,” Davies wrote. “They went back, very quietly, to the song they were supposed to be working on.” John sang a slight modification of the line they’d agreed on. “What do you see when you turn out the light?” Then he answered the question. “I can’t tell you, but I know it’s mine.”
Paul said it would do and he wrote the lines on a piece of exercise paper. Then he wandered around the room. outside the window, the eyes and foreheads of six girls could be seen as they jumped up and down on the sidewalk on Cavendish avenue, trying to catch a glimpse over the front wall into Paul’s property. John began to play a hymn on the piano.
After playing with his sitar, Paul went to his guitar, where, Davies wrote, he “started to sing and play a very slow, beautiful song about a foolish man sitting on the hill. John listened to it quietly, staring blankly out of the window.” Paul sang the song over and over again. “It was the first time Paul had played it for John,” Davies wrote. “There was no discussion.”
It was now about seven o’clock. They were due soon around the corner at the EMI studios on Abbey Road. They lit a joint and passed it between them. They decided to call Ringo and tell him they would do the song that night.
—  Powers of Two: Finding the essence of innovation in creative pairs - Joshua Wolf Shenk