marbled-polecat

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Marbled Polecats (Vormela peregusna) are an example of an animal you never really knew existed… until now. Their scientific name Vormela is from the German word Würmlein, which means “little worm,” probably because they’re wiggly little devils. Personally I think they resemble spotted hyenas if they were miniaturized by a giant ray gun, that, you know, miniaturizes. Their marbled bodies also remind me of that delicious pound cake you can never stop eating. WHY IS IT SO GOOD?!

[full article]

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Marbled polecat (Vormela peregusna)

The marbled polecat is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. Vormela is from the German word Würmlein, which means “little worm”. Marbled polecats are generally found in the drier areas and grasslands of southeastern Europe to western China. Like other members of Mustelinae, it can emit a strong-smelling secretion from anal sacs under the tail when threatened. Marbled polecats are most active during the morning and evening. Their eyesight is weak and they rely on a well-developed sense of smell. Marbled polecats are known to eat ground squirrels, Libyan jirds, Armenian hamsters, voles, mole rats, house mice, and other rodents, small hares, birds, lizards, fish, frogs, snails, and insects (beetles and crickets), as well as fruit and grass. In 2008, V. peregusna was classified as a vulnerable species in the IUCN Red List due to a population reduction of at least 30% in the previous 10 years.

photo credits: thefabweb, gencormanmuhendisleri, wiki, biolib.cz, ~fb~

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The marbled polecat (Vormela peregusna) is a small mammal belonging to the monotypic genus Vormela within the Mustelinae subfamily. Marbled polecats are generally found in the drier areas and grasslands of southeastern Europe to western China. Like other members of Mustelinae, it can emit a strong-smelling secretion from anal sacs under the tail when threatened.

[Read more: Wikipedia.] // [Photo source.]

Pippin the Marbled Polecat!

Pippin is a puckish trickster like no other! With an endless craving for a clever laugh, sharp wits and fast reflexes are ever at the ready for this polecat, regardless as to how others receive her unique brand of entertainment. Her behavior may seem strange, but for those ‘in’ on the joke, her antics are a performance to behold!

-David Wentworth 2015

This beauty is called the marbled polecat (Vormela peregusna) and as its name suggest, the marbled polecat has a black coat mottled with white or yellow spots and stripes. A distinctive black mask over its eyes characterizes its face, while its underparts are black. It has a long, sinuous body with short legs and a small, flat head with a blunt snout. When threatened, the marbled polecat curls its tail to display its warning coloration and emits an unpleasant odor. The marbled polecat enlarges rodent burrows to makes its den, and hunts at night, dawn, and dusk. They are solitary animals with a gestation of 56-63 days, and litter size ranges from 4-8 cubs. Nothing is safe from this mustelid, which eats a wide variety of rodents, hares, birds, lizards, fish, and even insects. This species is threatened by habitat loss and depletion of steppe rodents, one of its main foods.

Photo by Dark-Ness85