marble bags

anonymous asked:

Could you please point me to some Autistic owned stim stores? Thanks!

Sure! Please note, though, that unless otherwise specified, these stores are based in the US. For those willing to shop from neurodivergent-owned businesses (as distinct from specifically autistic) there’s a little more choice. If you’re not in the US, you’re very likely going to have to pay extra in conversion and shipping costs (which is why I don’t use ND-owned as a basis for what content goes on this blog, as cool as it is to support fellow autistic and ND creators).

If you’re an autistic crafter and you’re not on this list, it’s either because I haven’t yet heard of you, I’ve committed the terrible crime of forgetting you or I’m unsure if you’re autistic (as per the brief). Please comment; I will add your name and details!

I’m pretty sure most folks have heard of Stimtastic by now (@stimtastic), but on the off chance someone hasn’t, I’ll mention it! I don’t believe anyone has had any negative experiences with their order; the linked Tumblr is packed full of happy customers saying great things. There’s everything from fidget toys to chewables! I love my braid pendant, scented vial necklace and - while I didn’t buy it from Stimtastic because I found it here in Australia - crocheted stress balls. @werevampiwolf makes their bead rings!

@caseydickdanger on their Storenvy store Ca5ey sells handmade slimes, fidget toys, weighted plush, squishies and unique fidget jewellery.

@wiresandchains at etsy store Chain Mail Slime sells handmade slimes and very unique chainmail fidgets and fidget jewellery.

If you’re after cute crocheted plush toys, @stimwithoutshame runs etsy store Spacecraft Crafts.

If you’re after bean bags or marble mazes, @asenseofselfshop runs etsy store A Sense of Self.

@spacerobotstudio creates and sells amazing fidget jewellery, communication necklaces and pride accessories on etsy store Spacerobot Studio.

@dragonadventurescrafting sells a fabulous range of handmade plushies and bean bags on her etsy store Dragon Adventures Crafting.

@dollboy runs etsy store Weird Faeles where you can find chewellery and witchy jewellery.

@transsliime sells handmade dough and many varieties of slime on their etsy store TransSlimes!

Autistic Rabbit on etsy makes and sells weighted blankets!

Sister Cat Blankets (etsy, based in France) makes weighted lap pads, blankets and stim toy cases. (She’s one of the mods of @autistickitten but I don’t know her personal.)

@elsinore-snores runs etsy store PangeaMea (based in Greece) where you can find noise-muffling beanies and headbands.

@bartonnbishophumandisastersatlaw runs etsy store Wilde Spoons and Stims where you can buy marble mazes and dinosaur egg fidget toys.

@stevenuniversequartz runs Spoonie Studio, where they sell slimes, floam, glitter jar necklaces, putty and chewellery.

@neurodelightful runs etsy store NeuroDelightful, where you can find fidget jewellery and glitter/shaker bottle pendant necklaces and earrings. Some even glow in the dark!

@piefanart stocks handmade plushies and very cool gear/steampunk-styled fidget necklaces on etsy store PieFanart.

@papercrafthugs sells fidget bracelets and custom amigurumi from UK-based etsy store Papercraft Hugs.

Fidget Club is online retailer with a fabulous range of stim toys. They’re also one of the few autistic and ND owned stockists of Tangles!

@punkrockstimming sells a range of beaded fidget bracelets and beaded fidget toys at xyr etsy store True Trans Soul Rebel.

@fabulousfidgets stocks hot/cold bags and marble mazes on etsy store Fabulous Fidgets.

@luna-stims runs Etsy store Lunar Ocean Studio where you can find her Teeny Bean fidget bean bags.

Fuzzwumpet is an Etsy store based in Canada that sells marble mazes, monster bean bags and spoonie bag self-care kits.

@dailyspheal runs Etsy store Waggles Studio, which stocks handmade fidgets made from woven loom bands.

@yuuriandviktorkatsuki runs UK-based Etsy store Chloe G Crafts, where she currently stocks handmade bead bracelets and soft crochet bracelets, and will stock fidgety things made from split rings.

If you know more autistic-owned places to buy great toys, please let us know by commenting on this post or sending in an ask. Tumblr has stopped showing the notes in all reblogs, and we now get traffic enough that I (mod K.A.) don’t have the spoons to click on every reblog to see if there’s been an addition. We can’t miss comments, so you’ll help us a lot by commenting. Thank you!

a bit of an easily missed tidbit about jude up in his treehouse, i even missed it on my playthrough and didnt get this until i went back to get all the achievements

if you get the bag of marbles to the secret window with the cultists and rub them together, you get this text which suggests Jude is very overly sensitive to the sound that marbles make when clacking around together, which honestly isn’t that much of an unpleasant sound, but it really distracts him!

and this combined with obsessive paranoia about the cultists and conspiracy theories and his insistence about following proper flare gun safety rules and other such tangentially related traits paints for me a very strong picture that Jude is possibly autistic!

The absolute basics.

Let’s talk about the absolute basics in deduction. Seems like there’s a lot of people that misunderstand them, even other deductionists. This post is made to correct some of these misunderstandings.

What do we deductionists do? We gather information and make conclusions about that information. The premise is simple. Is it simple to get to the same level as Sherlock? No. Do I know of someone that is on the same level as Sherlock? No, and I know quite a few deductionists. But here’s the big reason why I don’t know of anyone at the same level as Sherlock, it’s not that Sherlock is fictional, it’s because of perfect situations that Sherlock is in. These happen, but not as often as Sherlock finds himself in them.

The way with OCC:

First of all, you should try and remember OCC. This the order in which you as a deductionist should operate.

Observation – Here you observe the place or person you are deducing. There are things to look for if you have the knowledge, some says you should observe everything, and sure, you should do that in a perfect world but you won’t be able to use everything you observe so that will only waste your time when you get into higher ranks of deduction. And if you want to know what to observe than all you need to do is practice.

Conclusion – The second step is to come to a conclusion from what you have observed. This is the deduction, we will talk more about this later on in this text. This will require both logic and knowledge. If you lack in one of these then you’ll need to train that.

Confirmation – Now this is something most deductionist don’t do because they are scared of failing. If you don’t confirm if you are right you’ll hinder your own progress extremely. If you can confirm, always try to.


The parts

Now, most break down deduction into two parts, logic and knowledge. I think that the knowledge part needs to be split into two parts. Absolute knowledge and statistical knowledge. This is important, I’ll try and explain why but first you need to know about the three kinds of deduction.


Deduction –

This reasoning is used when you have one or more statements that you combine to reach a logical conclusion.

The reasoning is that if the statements are true and clear the conclusion must be true.

An example of deductive reasoning:

Statements:

  1. Pink is not a natural hair colour.
  2. Emily has pink hair.

Conclusion:

  • Someone/something has dyed Emily’s hair pink.


This is deduction in which you use absolute knowledge to make a deduction. And if you truly use absolute knowledge then the conclusion will be correct.


Induction –

In inductive reasoning, you come to a conclusion that’s probable. The statements are viewed as strong evidence for your conclusion.

An example of inductive reasoning:

Statements:

  1. There are marbles in this bag.
  2. All 8 out of 10 marbles I have seen from this bag are black.

Conclusion:

  • All marbles from this bag are black.

This doesn’t tell you if the conclusion is true or not but thanks to the strong evidence of the statements you’re presented with, it’s probable that the conclusion is true. This is statistical knowledge and will be true most of the time.


Abduction –

In abductive reasoning, you have the statements and from that, you make an educated guess about what the conclusion might be. This reasoning is looking for the best explanation.

An example of abductive reasoning:

Statements:

  1. The grass is wet.
  2. The grass is usually dry.


Conclusion:

  • It has rained.

This is something we deductionists often do. We always look for the best explanation based on the evidence we are provided. This, if done correctly, will also most often be true. This will often be your own conducted statistical knowledge.


The reason why “knowledge” should be split into “absolute knowledge” and “statistical knowledge” is that if you have the logic you’ll never be wrong with absolute knowledge, but with statistical knowledge, you can still be wrong. Some tell you that logic is more important than knowledge and vice versa. This couldn’t be more wrong. Logic and knowledge are equally important. Those who don’t agree probably don’t know that much about the category they are dismissing. Logic and knowledge should work together alongside each other.

But if you want the “WOW effect” one of these triumphs over the other. If you do a deduction via logic people can see your train of thought quite easily, especially if you explain it. If you do deduction via knowledge then people won’t be able to follow your train of thought without that specific knowledge. And more people have a good logical mind than specific knowledge about everything. Something magicians have as a catchphrase nowadays are “People aren’t stupid” and that is true. If you, the reader of this thinks that most people are stupid then you need to come out of that bubble of yours.


Some other things.

So can you yourself measure how good you are at deduction? No, not really. You’ll always be biased towards yourself. So if you like yourself, you’ll probably think that you are better at deduction than you really are. If you think the worst of yourself then you’ll probably think you are worse than you really are. Then we have the “Dunning–Kruger effect”, most of you will probably, in the beginning, think that you are better at deduction than you really are, because of the Dunning-Kruger effect. It predicts that beginners rate themselves to be better than they really are while experts rate themselves to be worse than they really are. So no you can’t measure your skill level yourself.

This point I’ll make now is kind of connected to the previous one. Don’t assume you are right. That would be really stupid. If you assume you are right, you’ll fall for confirmation bias. This is when you look for things that would prove what you believe to be true, and miss things that disprove your theory. One more reason this is bad, I know of deductionists that don’t want to accept that they’re wrong, even if it’s confirmed. They think the one that tells them they’re wrong are lying. Extremely bad.

The pattern.

Your knowledge about deduction will improve. In the beginning, before you start deduction you’ll probably not know about it at all, you’ll have an unconscious ignorance towards it. When you start reading about it, you’ll probably understand that you don’t know much about it. So you’ll have a conscious ignorance towards it. After trying it out and really learning you’ll start noticing that you can deduce some things, you’ll have and conscious knowledge towards deduction. When you’ve become an expert to master you’ll make deductions without thinking that much, you’ll have an unconscious knowledge about deduction.


Pattern:

  1. Unconscious ignorance
  2. Conscious ignorance
  3. Conscious knowledge
  4. Unconscious knowledge

So, how do you get better in deduction? Practice, it might sound cliché but it’s true. But however, you can shorten the time quite much, if you confirm your deductions. The second C in OCC is extremely important. If you don’t know what you are doing wrong then you can’t improve. You won’t get better just from reading this. So go out there and make deductions and most importantly confirm your deductions.

If you want me to write a post about confirming your deductions about people without the fear to fail (because if you fail they won’t know that you’ve failed) then write to me about that. A lot of people seem to be afraid of saying their deductions out loud.

And with that, I’ll see you my irregulars.

safety-team  asked:

Do you have a master list of online shops for stim toys? Please please please haha

Since there were three pleases…!

Folks may or may not know that we have the retailer tags pages, A-L and M-Z. There’s so many retailers now that they’re difficult to search through unless you already know what you’re looking for, and they’re certainly not a rebloggable resource. I find them useful, but I’m well aware that they’re no longer useful for folks wanting a simple list. So in this post I’m going to give you the highlights, organised by category.

Please note that this master post absolutely does not include all online stim toy retailers. (Not even close. Not even remotely close.) I’m focusing on stores that are well-regarded and often referenced by the followers of this blog. In addition, I’m mostly listing stores that offer international shipping, in order to make this list useful for the largest amount of stimmers.

A huge shout-out goes to @cal3ris for the provision of the Netherlands/European stores added to this list. Thank you so very much!

You also might like to check out our autistic sellers and crafters master post for more autistic-owned stores, especially if you’re a US stimmer, as there’s many more crafters and creators well worth checking out.

So! Let us list!

General Stim and Fidget Toy Stores

A Sense of Self / @asenseofselfshop (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks bean bags, marble mazes and fidget jewellery.

Dragon Adventures Crafting / @dragonadventurescrafting (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks plush and plush fidgets.

Fabulous Fidgets / @fabulousfidgets​ (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks a wide range of fidget toys.

Fidget Club (USA): Autistic-owned, stocks a wide range of fidget toys.

Frans Color Creations / @franscolorcreations (USA, Etsy): 3D printed rings, 3D printed fidget toys, beaded fidget toys.

NeuroDelightful / @neurodelightful (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks fidget jewellery and stationery.

Spacerobot Studio / @spacerobotstudio (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks fidget and communication jewellery.

Stimtastic / @stimtastic (USA): Autistic-owned, stocks chewables, fidget jewellery, weighted items and fidget toys.

Specialist Stim Toy Stores

Antsy Labs (USA): Makers of the Fidget Cube.

Autistic Rabbit (USA, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks weighted blankets.

Fidgetland (USA): Makers of a variety of specialised chain fidgets.

GyRings (USA): ADHD-owned, maker of the GyRing fidget toy.

Sister Cat Blankets (France, Etsy): Autistic-owned, stocks weighted blankets, lap pads and stim toy cases.

OT and Therapy Toy Stores

(Note: most of these are heavily focused on therapy and children. Many of these also use alienating language - not person-first, “children on the spectrum”. Please consider this a blanket warning for all the below vendors.)

Children’s Therapy Store (USA): OT toys, chewables, a wide range of specialist fidgets.

Cheap Disability Aids (UK): OT toys, fidgets, chewables.

Educadora (Netherlands): OT toys, fidgets, but mostly chewables.

Fun and Function (USA): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. Note: uses the phrase “special needs” a lot.

Moderne Moeders (Netherlands): Chewables aimed at moms/infants. But they have stuff I’ve never seen at other shops, so worth a mention. Ships also to Belgium, Germany, Denmark, France, UK, Sweden.

Muisje Sensitief (Netherlands): OT toys, fidgets, chewables, weighted materials. Ships to the Netherlands, Belgium, Germany, Curaçao.

National Autism Resources (USA): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. Has more of a focus on fidget toys.

Senso-Care (Netherlands | Belgium | Germany): OT toys, fidgets, chewables, weighted materials. Ships also to several other European countries, but for these the shipping costs are quite high.

Sensory University (USA): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. More focus on OT toys and chewables.

Sisigma (Netherlands): OT toys, fidgets, chewables, weighted materials. Ships to Europe Zone 1.

Sister Sensory (Australia): OT toys, fidgets, chewables.

Sensory Oasis for Kids (Australia): stim and fidget toys, weighted, chewables.

Skillbuilders (Australia): OT toys, fidgets, chewables.

Therapy Shoppe (USA): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. Stocks a very broad range with items that I haven’t seen elsewhere.

The Therapy Store (Australia): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. Focuses more on fidget toys.

Tink n’ Stink (UK): OT toys, fidgets, chewables. Has a good range of chewables and fidgets.

Toys for Hands (Netherlands): OT toys and fidgets.

Chewable Stores

(Note: most of these are also heavily focused on therapy and children, although more of these do mention adult chewers. Many of these also use alienating language - not person-first, “children on the spectrum”. Please consider this a blanket warning for all of the below vendors.)

ARK Therapeutic (USA): a wide range of handheld and pendant necklace chewables available in three different toughnesses.

Chewigem (Australia | UK | USA | Canada): a wide range of handheld and pendant necklace chewables.

Chubuddy (USA): a wide range of handheld, pendant necklace and tube chewables rated by toughness.

Teething Bling (USA): a very wide range of pendant chewables. Focused on parents-with-children, no toughness ratings. Good for folks after unique styles.

General Retailers

AliExpress (China): sells a wide range of cheap fidget toys and chewables. Be wary about the chemical listings for chewables, however. Free shipping on many listings.

Amazon (USA | UK): sells fidgets, chewables, squishies, Tangles. Note that a large amount of offerings are US or North America only, so often less useful for international stimmers.

eBay (Australia | USA | UK): everything. Knock-off fidget cubes, spinners, squishies, knock-off Tangles and other China, Hong Kong of Taiwan-sourced listings often have free shipping.

Banggood (China): cheap and high quality squishies, spinners, knock-off fidget cubes. Free shipping on the vast majority of their items.

Fat Brain Toys (USA): educational toy store, sells fidget toys, puzzles and Tangles.

K-Mart (Australia): fidget toys, puzzles, mermaid sequin pillows. Very cheap items for Australians.

Office Oxygen (USA): fidget and office toys. Similar to the now-closed Office Playground.

Smiggle (Australia | UK): fidget toys and stationery. International shipping from the Australian store to anywhere not New Zealand is extremely expensive.

Wish (China): cheap squishies, spinners, knock-off fidget cubes, knock-off Tangles. Shipping on items is generally listed as $2 in buyer’s own currency. Has some extremely good low-cost sales, but the non-sale prices on items is higher than eBay or Banggood.

I’ve noticed, in compiling this list, a distinct lack of UK or European online resources. I would be very grateful if our UK and European followers could send me a few good recommendations!

- Mod K.A.

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etsyfindoftheday 2 | 3.6.18

stone-look reusable paper bags by warmgreycompany

add a unique texture pop to your home with a reusable, washable paper bag in multiple sizes and patterns — i love the stone look of these two, and the metallic shine of the top inside bags.