manuscript art

8

Hello, all my lovely followers! Long time no see! Sorry for the prolonged lack of original posts, but I’ve been crazy busy at my new job as Library Technician at Smithsonian Libraries (@smithsonianlibraries)! I’m working primarily at the Cullman Library in the Natural History Museum, which houses the Smithsonian’s special collections relating to natural history, although I’ve also spent some time at the Dibner Library, which is home to special collections relating to the physical sciences.

Although I’ve only been there for two months, I’ve had the opportunity to do and see some amazing things! From a shelving unit for miniature books to a well-loved 13th century Armenian manuscript (MSS 1675B), the Libraries are truly full of wonders great and small. One of my favorites is the volvelle, or rotating calculator, found in a 16th century alchemical manuscript (MSS 867B)– I just love it when books are interactive! Expect more from that one in the future.

4

#ColorOurCollections: The Getty Coloring Book

Feeling stressed? Bored? Want to do something while you stream Netflix? We got you covered. Download our free coloring book of artworks from the Getty Museum and the Getty Research Institute. 

Download here.

If you check out the hashtag, #ColorOurCollections, you can see even more fun coloring pages from places like @huntingtonlibrary, @smithsonianlibraries, @bodleianlibs and more.

Medieval manuscript of the week is a stunningly bound manuscript from Flanders or France. It is one of the treasures of the Bodleian library, and currently on display in the new Treasures exhibition in the Weston Library.

I’d love to tell you more about the manuscript, but my computer isn’t cooperating tonight, so you’ll have to savour the photo of the luxurious binding and wait for more details later in the week!

Image source: Author’s own. Released into the public domain. The manuscript is Bodleian MS Auct D 4.2

Nature in her forge

(Roman de la Rose vv. 15897-15905: ‘Nature, whose thoughts were on the things enclosed beneath the sky, had entered her forge, where she was concentrating all her efforts upon the forging of individual creatures to continue the species. For individuals give such life to species that, however much death pursues them, she can never catch up with them.’ – transl. F. Horgan)

Roman de la Rose, Bruges ca. 1490-1500

BL, Harley 4425, fol. 140r

2

“I don’t have to look far to find treasures.  I discover them every time I visit a library.”  Michael Embry


Morgan Library & Museum