manhattan theater club

My father was the best person I have ever known and though he was taken from me on that day, nothing and no one will ever be able to take way the eight years and two days of my life that I shared with him. After my father died, and after I lost so much, I promised myself that I would never lose who I am as a person – the person that my father brought me up to be. … If you owe someone an apology, tell them you are sorry today. If someone asks for your forgiveness, forgive them. Start being the person you always wanted to be today and don’t waste your time worrying about tomorrow.
—  Mary Kate McErlean, whose father was killed on 9/11 when she was eight years old.

View Bio on Official Site

ANSEL ELGORT [Caleb Prior] most recently starred in Academy Award® nominee Jason Reitman’s film Men, Women & Children, opposite Adam Sandler and Jennifer Garner.

Elgort also starred in the recent Fox feature The Fault In Our Stars, based on the New York Times bestselling book by John Green. The film topped the box office in its opening weekend and has since grossed over $300 million worldwide. For this performance, Elgort won a number of 2014 Teen Choice and Young Hollywood Awards including Choice Movie Breakout Star and Fan Favorite Actor.

In March 2015, he reprises his role as Caleb in The Divergent Series: Insurgent, the sequel to the Summit Entertainment feature Divergent, starring opposite Shailene Woodley, Theo James, and Kate Winslet.

A graduate of LaGuardia High School of the Performing Arts, Elgort’s first professional acting job was in Manhattan Theater Club’s production of Matt Charman’s play Regrets, directed by Carolyn Cantor and starring opposite Alexis Bledel, while finishing up his senior year of high school. His performance received rave reviews, including Bloomberg’s “Elgort is a magnetic presence destined perhaps for the multiplex.” Prior to the closing of the play, Elgort was cast as the role of Tommy Ross in Kimberly Peirce’s Carrie, opposite Julianne Moore and Chloë Grace Moretz.

Elgort found his love for performing through dance. He was featured tap-dancing at the CFDA Awards in 2011, and as a child he performed both in The Nutcracker and Swan Lake at Lincoln Center with the New York City Ballet. As a singer, Elgort has worked with many composers including Jason Robert Brown, Glen Roven, and Louis Andriessen.

He is also an electronic dance music producer and DJ. Elgort’s first official release “Unite” released via Staar Traxx, reached #17 Overall on Beatport. His second single “TOTEM” was released on Steve Angello of Swedish House Mafia’s SIZE label. “TOTEM” peaked at #1 on Beatport’s Top 100, and #9 on the iTunes Dance Chart.

Elgort currently resides in New York.

3

Grand Central Terminal. Midtown. Grand Central Market has a nice variety of meat and seafood. Those kababs look good…I haven’t had a kabab in years! If you have a long ride home, just ask the butcher or seafood monger to put your order on ice, I’m sure they will oblige.

Money Talks, Bullshit Walks

I got a call from XYZ Theater Company today- those calls you get thanking you for your support in the past and don’t you want to become a member or donate today?

“I see the last show you saw here was two years ago…what’s been going on? Why haven’t we seen you?”

“You’ve been producing a bunch of plays by white guys and it’s not interesting to me anymore.”

This is not the first time this has happened. I got a call a while back from MCC who asked what I thought of their seasons and I said “There’s too much LaBute.”

When these theater solicitors call you, I want to encourage you to talk with them. Tell them you want more diversity. Tell them you’re looking for more representation onstage. If they’re doing a good job of it, tell them so. (I took a call from Manhattan Theater Club and they asked why I’d seen Airline Highway and I said “because it was the only new play by a woman on Broadway.”) They are most likely writing this down. * Don’t hang up and don’t be rude about it- it’s not the call center person’s fault- but be polite and firm and tell them why you are or aren’t spending your money with them.

Maybe if enough people say something, it’ll make the higher-ups look at why we buy our tickets the way we do.


*I had this job once. There’s a space in each potential donor’s box for notes, where we’d write down preferences and any other relevant information to go into their file.