man vs nature

anonymous asked:

What are some of your favorite books currently?

Okay, so this question requires a bit of explanation of my reading habits. There are four types of books that I read: Dime Store Novels, of Literary Merit, Smart Books, and Reference Books.

Dime store novels: Books that are written to tell a story and just to tell a story. They’re not out to challenge the genre or blow our minds with inventive structure. Currently on my nightstand:

  • Patricia Briggs (Alpha and Omega series): Actually anything by Patricia Briggs. I love her. Everything she’s written is the sort of strong, female characters that I craved growing up.
  • Tamora Pierce (ALL): Same as above, she’s got wonderfully strong female characters and I love her.
  • Victoria Laurie (Ghost Hunter series): Simple, straight-forward series with exciting characters and premise! I read her books super fast, I’d say it takes me about two, three hours to read one of hers.
  • Mira Grant (Parasitology): She’s always so wonderful about building worlds through character/character relationships. Fun read, edge of the seat in a lot of ways, can’t wait to get to book two! Probably takes me 4-8 hours to read one book.

Of Literary Merit: Books that do defy genre, blow our minds, are probably going to win a handful of awards. Currently on my nightstand:

  • George Saunders (10th of December): One of my FAVE short story collections, it won something like…three? awards including like best short story collection of the year.
  • Celeste Ng (Everything I Never Told You): I actually don’t know if this has won an award but it was AMAZING NO SPOILERS GO READ IT
  • Flannery O’Connor (Wise Blood): I’m actually just starting this! I’ll keep you posted~
  • Jennifer Egan (A visit from the goon squad): One of my all time FAVES, got me into intertwining narrative, I love it.

Smart Books: Books that make me look very intelligent (or pretentious) when I go home for the holidays. They tend to be fairly controversial in subject matter and/or wildly misunderstood to be smart in the first place. Most of them I even like which is a bonus! My go to books:

  • Candide by Voltaire: Great book, hilarious and people think it’s not filled with A plus satire because Voltaire sounds very fancy.
  • The Dubliners by James Joyce: Short story collection of classic narrative, big themes of imminent death, man vs. nature, etc. 
  • The Lucifer Effect by Philip Zimbardo: About the Stanford Prison experiment. It’s okay, I don’t necessarily agree with the stance Dr. Zimbardo takes on his experiment/actions, but he doesn’t expect you too, I don’t think.

Reference Books: Books that I read over and over again because I WANT TO WRITE LIKE THAT:

  • American Gods by Neil Gaiman: What the fuck. What the fuck. The detail?????? The characters???? Shadow???? What the fuck.
  • Two or Three Things I Know for Sure by Dorothy Allison - I cry every time I read this book. It’s so raw and honest, it takes my breath away. Every time.
  • The Earth and Everything Underneath by K.M Ferebee: So gorgous, the imagery is incredible and it’s about witches. It’s actually a short story that you can read here (X) and I really recommend you check out Shimmer in general because it’s a great magazine.

As always, there’s a ton more that I enjoy, but these are in my rotation right now! Ask me again in a month and they’ll be all different.

anonymous asked:

Hello! So I was scouring the Internet for advice today but I couldn't find any on this topic. My problem isn't that I don't have any ideas (I probably have too many) but the problem is that I don't LOVE any of my ideas. I like them. I think they're all fine ideas. But liking them isn't going to motivate me long enough to finish a novel. How can I give my ideas that extra uumph to make me love them? How can I figure out what's missing or why I don't feel this way about any of my ideas?

Hello, nonny!  What a challenging question…  This one’s been in my inbox a couple days, just because it’s such a big question.  But I’ve thought it over and I think I have some ideas for you :)


The Thrill Is Gone – How to Find It Again

So generally, there’s no one answer or cure-all to this problem.  I’ve had this issue multiple times, with different causes.  My first novel didn’t have enough meat to the plot; my second novel had been over-planned in my head to the point that it no longer excited me.  My third novel had way too much plot, so that by the time I got ¾ the way through, I’d written over 200K words and felt sick of the idea.  I started my fourth novel way too soon, and am now going back and planning it more!  So there are obviously many different reasons that a story doesn’t take off (or dries up eventually).

The first step is to figure out what’s missing, like you said.  There are a few aspects of your story to assess…


1. Plot

I’m discussing plot first because, to me, it’s the most important part of fiction.  Plot, conflict, and stakes are foremost to my stories.  You could have the most complex and sympathetic characters, but without plot, they’re static and become boring.  But for some reason, this is the part of story ideas that new authors neglect most!

So if your story has great characters and an immersive setting, but you can’t get into it, try asking a few questions about your plot:

  • What is the point of the plot?  What’s the message you’re conveying in the story?  Even if your story isn’t an allegory or a metaphor or the next Chronicles of Narnia, there should always be a conclusion to which all plots arrive – otherwise, the story can feel aimless.  The best way to find your message is to look at the conflicts involved (e.g. Man vs. Man, Man vs. Nature, etc.) and find the “winner”.  What worldview, belief, or concept “defeats” the other concepts?  It can be as simple as Good vs. Evil, or more complex, like Loving the Sincere Drug Addict vs. Settling for the Selfish Dentist (provokes the question “Is love worth danger in relationships?”).
  • Does the plot have ups and downs?  And really consider both ends of the spectrum here.  Stories become dull if they are made up of victory after victory – or if they’re made up of nothing but loss and tragedy.  No matter the genre, you have to strike some sort of balance, lest the story become predictable and emotionally non-engaging.  Find victories and failures, even in unassuming places, to keep readers invested and hopeful.
  • Do you have a satisfactory ending?  Or do you have the ending     planned yet?  I’ve found that I can’t really commit to an idea unless I see a resolution – otherwise I feel too nervous to start.  If you do have an ending planned, make sure it’s the right ending.  It can feel like there’s one possible conclusion, and once you’ve found it, you stick to it – but question it, brainstorm it.  It may not be a happy ending every time, but when you find the right one, you’ll know it.
  • Do you have the right plot at all?  Look at your story as a whole.  Does it start too early or too late, relative to the real meat,     the real action?  Is it told from the most impactful POV?  Does the plot cover too much ground for one book, or is it not enough to fill the pages?  Consider all the characters, backstories, and subplots you have, and ask yourself if any of them are more interesting than the main plot.  If so, shift your focus.  Use them instead.

2. Characters

Maybe it’s not your plot that’s going sideways.  Maybe you have it all worked out – the head, the tail, the whole damn thing – but it still doesn’t feel right.  It doesn’t feel like it’s coming to life, somehow.  It feels flat.

That can be a character problem.  It would be like sitting by the campfire and hearing the most fascinating, horrifying story, except it’s told by a man with The Most Boring Voice Who Talks So Incredibly Slowly and Takes All the Fun Out of Everything.  An example: The Hunger Games.  Those books bored the crap out of me.  Unless someone was being killed or Haymitch and Effie were interacting, I just didn’t care.  And those books had a great plot behind them!

So here’s what you need for a good cast of characters:

  • A solid protagonist.  Solid = three-dimensional, empathetic, and relatable; having a goal, an internal conflict, a self-image, and fears or shame.  They should have different facets of themselves – their head and their heart, their desires and doubts, and that little voice in their head that says, “Give up on that.  Be realistic.”  Give them strengths, weaknesses, and a couple of bad habits, for kicks.
  • A variety of supporting characters.  You don’t have to have thirty characters + six secret characters stuffed under your trench coat; but with however many characters you have, make them as different from each other as possible.  Give them some similarities, of course, so that they can relate to each other – but never make them so close together that you have to decide, “Who should say this line?  Character A or Character B?”  Make them unique enough that the words come out of their mouths, instead of you having to decide where to put the words, yourself.
  • Relationships, relationships, relationships.  And I’m not talking about romantic relationships.  I mean, sure, those too – but there are many different kinds of relationships to explore.  Friendships, enemy-ships (?), parent relationships, sibling-ships, silent alliances, “annoying friend-of-a-friend”-ships, “my-ex’s-little-sister”-ships, “you’re-the-ruler-of-the-galaxy-and-a-Sith-lord-but-also-my-dad-please-stop-being-evil”-ships…  You get the idea.  Make them unique, make them strong, and allow them to evolve over the course of the story.
  • Diverse morals, interests, and personalities.  My first short stories focused on white middle-class people who were culturally and politically identical.  They lived in one house, usually, and watched the same TV shows and made the same references.  They had the same sense of humor.  They rarely disagreed on anything that wasn’t clear-cut (e.g. “You drank the last Pepsi!”  “I was thirsty!”).  So do yourself a favor and don’t make my mistakes.  Give your characters unique ethics, cultures, backgrounds, personalities, goals, appearances, and conflicts.  You’ll be more invested by then, I’m sure.

3. Setting

Lastly, I’d like to add that while your characters and plot could be well-developed, there’s always a chance that they’re placed in the wrong setting.  This is why many story ideas can seem great, but won’t get off the ground – maybe they’re set in a pre-made universe like Middle Earth or Panem when they could be their own story.  Maybe your tragic romance is set in the middle of apocalyptic war, when instead, it should be drained down to a period piece.  Maybe your story is perfect, except you’re writing it too close to home – in the real world, in the present year.  There are a million factors to picking the right setting, including:

  • Applicable history and culture.  If you’re writing a story about someone who’s oppressed, or someone who’s a politician, or someone who’s a witch, you’re going to need to back that up with history.  Develop a history for the oppression or politics or witchcraft – where these things began, how they developed over time – and a culture for them now – how oppressed people survive and how witches in your world interact, etc.
  • Imaginative scenery, influenced by the characters.  Even if your story takes place in New York City in 2017, allow your characters’ living spaces and workplaces to have a unique touch – colors and quirks that your readers can see in their mind.  If even you can’t see what you’re writing, inspiration is going to be difficult to find.
  • A lifelike background.  Just because the plot focuses on your characters does not mean everything going on behind it should be quiet and dead.  Anyone who looks out a window in a city building can see other people living – people on the highway will see other cars taking other people other places.  Everyone who has a friend will hear a little something about their friend’s siblings, their friend’s friends, their friend’s neighbors.  Life and stories exist outside of your plot; make sure you’re not writing about a ship in a bottle.
  • An aesthetic.  That sounds gross and teen-tumblr-y, but let me tell you personally: I don’t feel truly ready to write (and love) my story until I can hear the music for the future movie adaptation – until I can see the kind of clothes the people wear, the games they play, the places they eat and shop.  I think of the colors and themes in my scenes (e.g. my first novel was set primarily at night in a grunge/city setting; my current novel is very green and outdoorsy and gives me that feeling of bonfires just after sunset).  Once you get that “feeling” from your story, you’ll know it.

Anyway, this reply took me like three days to write because I really wanted to get into it.  I hope some of this helps you to fall in love with one of your ideas, so you can get started :)  If you have any more questions, be sure to send them in!

(I have 26 questions in the inbox, though, so be patient with me…)


If you need advice on writing, fanfiction, or NaNoWriMo, you should maybe ask me!

Dear Billy, Today I Saw Kong Skull Island

I’m still a bit ill and thus couldn’t risk eating popcorn, but it was so worth it.

Some assorted, mostly spoiler-free thoughts (full review to come after I get a chance to see it again):

  • Cinemasins and Cracked.com will hate this movie, as they always do
  • Like Godzilla (2014), I absolutely loved it even though it isn’t a flawless movie
  • Like Godzilla (2014), its few flaws will be harped on by the fandom so hard that I will become irrationally defensive of it as a result
  • John C. Reilly almost steals the show from Kong in the best possible way - he is one of the best human characters in any kaiju movie
  • This feels like a King Kong story told in the mold of a Godzilla story, and I love that
    • Not just in a “we’re setting up Godzilla vs. King Kong” way or a “Hollywood always copies the formula of a successful film dozens of times over until people are sick of it” way, either.  This movie actually feels very different from Godzilla (2014) while still feeling like they belong in the same universe.  Its approach to monsters and the man vs. nature concept is what particularly feels like a Godzilla thing more than a Kong thing - it’s the first movie to defend the native people and fauna of Skull Island instead of casting them unanimously as monsters
    • I wish the Skull Islanders had gotten more to do, but after marathoning all the previous Kong movies, I’m more than content with them barely getting to do anything so long as it means they aren’t being a horrible racist caricature of various indigenous people.  Especially after the 2005 movie, which, while a wonderful movie in several respects, is definitely the worst of the bunch when it comes to presenting the Skull Islanders as people.
  • The monster designs are ingenious and creative, making Skull Island once again feel mysterious and strange despite how commonplace CGI monsters are these days
  • The monster fights were fucking marvelous and and common.  I am sure people will complain there weren’t enough of them or that some were too short.
    • one of the shorter ones also had one of my favorite “monsters as animals with needs and motivations” moments in the movie that was really funny and endearing and I’m 100% certain people will hate it because it was such a “curbstomp” battle but fuck it sometimes you want to see *SPOILERS OMITTED*
  • By far the best part of the movie for me was the fact that four little kids were sitting behind me having the time of their lives watching an awesome monster movie.  During the end credits (like me and my family, they were waiting for the stinger) they chattered about how they hoped Mothra would be showing up in the Monsterverse next, so they were clearly Godzilla fans who knew they shit rather than complete newbies to the world of kaiju.  I wish I had a movie like this when I was their age.
  • The stinger is SO worth it.