man mower

washingtonpost.com
Meet the man who travels the country mowing lawns — free
Rodney Smith has mowed pocket-size yards and vast expanses, with a goal of doing a lawn in all 50 states. He hopes to inspire a new generation to follow his example.
By https://www.facebook.com/tarabahrampour

With all the rain the Washington area had been getting, it seemed to Tania Castro as if the weeds were growing three inches a day.

She had bought a house last year on half an acre in Lusby, Md., but now the lot felt impossibly large. A single mom of three kids, the youngest of whom has autism, Castro works 60 hours a week and hadn’t stayed on top of the mowing.

By late spring, the lawn had sprouted vegetation so tall and thick that she couldn’t get a mower through, and professional services were quoting her astronomical fees. Castro, 44, was stressed — and unsure what to do.

Then a man with a mower came along, and took care of the whole thing. Free.

Rodney Smith Jr., 28, is driving across the United States in search of people like Castro — single moms, veterans, disabled people and older people who need help with their lawns.

“A lot of them are on fixed incomes, and they really can’t afford to pay someone,” said Smith, who lives in Huntsville, Ala. Traveling around the country, he said, “I realized that it’s a bigger need than I thought.”

He has mowed pocket-size yards and vast expanses, with a goal of doing a lawn in all 50 states. And he is hoping to inspire a new generation to follow his example.

In his hyper-realistic sculptures portraying working-class Americans, Duane Hanson eschewed the predominant Expressionist and Minimalist concerns of the 1950s and 1960s for an unflinching investigation of the human condition. 

Hanson was born today, January 17 in 1925 in Alexandria, Minnesota. The American artist would be celebrating his 91st year had he not passed away 20 years this month in 1996.   

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Image: Duane Hanson, Man on a Mower, 1995, bronze polychromed in oil, with mower, 62 5/8 × 34 ¼ × 60 5/8 inches, (159.1 × 87 × 154 cm), Edition with 3 additional bronze variations