malnutrition

gawker.com
School Bus Driver Fired for Facebook Post About Hungry Student
The actual people who work with our children care a lot more about them than the superintendents and city officials too busy firing people and closing schools to even notice them.

===

Bus driver Johnny Cook believed he was doing the right thing when he took to his personal Facebook page to recount the story of a middle school student who approached him to complain about having to go without lunch because he was 40 cents short on his pre-paid cafeteria account.

“This child is already on reduced lunch and we can’t let him eat. Are you kidding me?” Cook wrote in the post. “I’m certain there was leftover food thrown away today.”

Many agreed with Cook’s position, sharing his words tens thousands of times.

But his message also struck a negative chord with officials at Georgia’s Haralson County Middle School, who promptly let him go after he refused to take down the post and apologize.

 … Meanwhile, Cook says he’s been receiving messages of support from parents all around the country who say the same thing happened to their child.

Where In The World Is The Best Place For Healthy Eating?

The Dutch are known for their lax drug laws, tall statures and proficient language skills.

Perhaps we should add stellar eating habits to that list, as well.

The Netherlands ranked as the easiest country in the world to find a balanced, nutritious diet, the advocacy group Oxfam reported Tuesday.

France and Switzerland shared the second slot. And Western Europe nearly swept the top 20 positions, with Australia just edging into a tie for 8th.

Where did the U.S. land?

We tied with Japan for 21st place, despite the fact that we have the most cheap food available worldwide. Our friendly neighbors to the north, Canada, took the 25th position out of 125 countries.

A group of researchers at Oxfam, an anti-poverty nonprofit based in Oxford, England, concocted the ranking scheme to measure the best and worst places to eat around the world.

The team’s conclusion?

“Basically, if you arrive from Mars, and design a food system, you probably couldn’t design a worse one than what we have today on Earth,” Oxfam's Max Lawson tells The Salt. “There is enough food overall in the world to feed everyone. But 900 million people still don’t have enough to eat, and 1 billion people are obese. It’s a crazy situation.”

Continue reading.

Photograph: I could get my daily servings of fruit and vegetables at this food court in the middle of Amsterdam. All the dishes are freshly prepared right in front of you. (Werner Kunz/Flickr.com under a CC BY-NC-SA license).

In the Starved for Attention film “Why Do We Have To Wait For A Crisis?“ photojournalist Lynsey Addario documents the food crisis in Somalia and northeastern Kenya. All children have the same nutritional needs to grow and thrive. It shouldn’t take a war or famine to occur before vulnerable children have access to a healthy diet.

This is one of 195 million stories of malnutrition. Sign the petition and donate your profile to help us rewrite the story.

Photo: © Lynsey Addario/VII

Godfrey, 1, who is suffering from acute malnutrition, sits in the UNICEF-supported Al-Shabbah Children’s Hospital in Juba, South Sudan. The lives of more than a quarter of a million children are at risk from a rapidly worsening nutrition situation in the country. © UNICEF/NYHQ2015-1395/Rich

For the better part of the last six months to ten months it’s been clear that there has been a problem with rainfall in the Horn of Africa. In the Starved for Attention film “Why Do We Have To Wait For A Crisis?“ photojournalist Lynsey Addario documents the food crisis in Somalia and northeastern Kenya. All children have the same nutritional needs to grow and thrive. It shouldn’t take a war or famine to occur before vulnerable children have access to a healthy diet.

This is one of 195 million stories of malnutrition. Sign the petition and donate your profile to help us rewrite the story.

Photo: © Lynsey Addario/VII

youtube

Starved for Attention: Rewriting the Story of Child Malnutrition from Doctors without Borders

Learn more here.

Somalia: Aid to Displaced People in Mogadishu Still Insufficient

Ravaged by 20 years of civil war, Mogadishu, Somalia’s capital, has experienced an influx of displaced persons in the last three months. Providing aid to people who have fled hunger and fighting is a constant challenge in this chaotic urban setting. Read more

Somalia 2011 © Yann Libessart/MSF

Milk teeth of Irish famine’s youngest victims reveal secrets of malnutrition

Tiny teeth of babies who died in the Irish famine in the 1840s, or soon afterwards when their parents moved to London in search of work, reveal they were the starving children of malnourished mothers – but the analysis may also help predict medical problems among contemporary children.

The remains, from a graveyard in Lukin Street, which in the 19th century was a slum area of Whitechapel in east London, and from the site of a workhouse in County Kilkenny in Ireland, showed the dead babies had higher nitrogen levels than found in the bones of children who survived infancy.

The levels fluctuated wildly among the dead babies, while they were comparatively stable among those who lived into childhood or adolescence. The findings overturn the previous belief that high nitrogen levels are generally an indicator of good nourishment – including a diet rich in fish among the Londoners.

“The point about these babies is that they died,” Julia Beaumont, of the Bradford University department of archaeological sciences, said. “Something else is obviously going on here.”

An Irish famine memorial in Dublin. Photograph: Niall Carson/PA

Dadaab is the largest refugee camp in the world, literally the third largest city in Kenya. In the Starved for Attention film “Why Do We Have To Wait For A Crisis?“ photojournalist Lynsey Addario documents the food crisis in Somalia and northeastern Kenya. All children have the same nutritional needs to grow and thrive. It shouldn’t take a war or famine to occur before vulnerable children have access to a healthy diet.

This is one of 195 million stories of malnutrition. Sign the petition and donate your profile to help us rewrite the story.

Photo: © Lynsey Addario/VII

Climate change and human health: Spatial modeling of water availability, malnutrition, and livelihoods in Mali, Africa

Jankowska, M.M., D. Lopez-Carr, C. Funk, G.J. Husak, and Z.A. Chafe, 2012: “Climate change and human health: Spatial modeling of water availability, malnutrition, and livelihoods in Mali, Africa.” Applied Geography, v. 33, pp. 4-15, doi: 10.1016/j.apgeog.2011.08.009.

This study develops a novel approach for projecting climate trends in the Sahel in relation to shifting livelihood zones and health outcomes. Focusing on Mali, we explore baseline relationships between temperature, precipitation, livelihood, and malnutrition in 407 Demographic and Health Survey (DHS) clusters with a total of 14,238 children, resulting in a thorough spatial analysis of coupled climate-health dynamics. Results suggest links between livelihoods and each measure of malnutrition, as well as a link between climate and stunting. A ‘front-line’ of vulnerability, related to the transition between agricultural and pastoral livelihoods, is identified as an area where mitigation efforts might be usefully targeted. Additionally, climate is projected to 2025 for the Sahel, and demographic trends are introduced to explore how the intersection of climate and demographics may shift the vulnerability ‘front-line’, potentially exposing an additional 6 million people in Mali, up to a million of them children, to heightened risk of malnutrition from climate and livelihood changes. Results indicate that, holding constant morbidity levels, approximately one quarter of a million children will suffer stunting, nearly two hundred thousand will be malnourished, and over one hundred thousand will become anemic in this expanding arid zone by 2025. Climate and health research conducted at finer spatial scales and within shorter projected time lines can identify vulnerability hot spots that are of the highest priority for adaptation interventions; such an analysis can also identify areas with similar characteristics that may be at heightened risk. Such meso-scale coupled human-environment research may facilitate appropriate policy interventions strategically located beyond today’s vulnerability front-line.

Subscription Required

CAN YOU SEE ME?

Khaled Ibn Al-Waleed (age 5 months), who is severely malnourished, was rushed to Al-Sabeen Hospital in Sana’a, Yeman after suffering from vomiting and diarrhoea for 10 days.

His mother comforts him, at the hospital’s UNICEF-supported therapeutic feeding centre.

Yemen has the world’s second-highest rates of chronic malnutrition, largely stemming from poor nutritional practices and unsafe water. More than 250,000 Yemeni children are at risk of dying from acute malnutrition.

© UNICEF/Ameen AlGhabri

To see more: www.unicef.org/photography

“When we asked Maria Pilar whether she would save some of the peas she was tirelessly weeding, she looked at us like we were nuts. Her answer was, “I’ve heard people eat these things. But no, not me.” And that was part of the very problem we were in Guatemala to unpack. Half the children in Guatemala are malnourished — as many as three-fourths in the rural areas. And long-term studies have shown that malnutrition at an early age can cause “stunting” in physical and intellectual development,” reports Hari Sreenivasan.

Three-quarters of children in rural Guatemala are chronically malnourished, while residents of the capital thrive. Hari Sreenivasan takes a closer look at malnutrition in a land of plenty.

Image by Hari Sreenivasan. Guatemala, 2014.

Read the full story for PBS: Newshour story here.