male hip

Unfortunately black women (including myself) continue to support and/or listen to rap/hip hop music which refers to them as bitches and hoes, yet whenever a rapper exhibits misogynoir outside of his music, we take to social media to drag him. We get outraged, while other men defend him (because that’s what men in our community do, they defend each other’s misogynoir so they can continue to profit off of our oppression) but in the end we still actively consume content that objectifies, sexualizes, and degrades black women. The normalization of misogynoir in our culture and community is unacceptable. I’m tired of hearing “That’s just how rap is” or the deflections and think pieces about how rock is just as damaging as rap/hip hop. When are we going to address the elephant in the room, that rap/hip hop has encouraged and propagated some of the most damaging images and caricatures of black women? When are we going to hold rappers accountable for their rampant colorism?(Consistently portraying lighter skin women as the end all be all, the ultimate standard of beauty, while dark skin women are merely props for hyper-sexualization.) As black women when do we have these conversations and decide that enough is enough? Instead of accepting hypocritical and inconsistent misrepresentations of ourselves, when do we decide to take control of our own image and leave toxic black media behind?

The Time I Pushed a Jerkface off a 35ft Cliff(With Good Reason)

Before we start off let me be clear. I did not murder a man by randomly shoving him off a cliff. Technically, I actually had permission, but still not murder. Chill.

Here we go.

So this is back in Mexico, at the same park as the Sting Ray Incident, just an hour later. Id already recovered from my near death experience and moved on from my friend nearly drowning me. I faced it, i survived, im good and not concerned.

One of the many attractions at this park was the Cliff of Courage. It’s a 35ft cliff that plunges into the water. Now, by my standards, 35ft is low for a cliff jump. Ive done way higher (adrenaline junkie) but obviously i was gonna jump just to say that I did. My parents, grandparents, and Jamie didnt want to jump. No surprise, so they went ahead to meet me on the other side of the river.

So sixteen year old me wanders over and there’s this big group of burly looking men.

Like huge

They’re all standing at the edge jostling each other around. And just by looking at them you can see they’re american. I dont even need to hear their texan accents to know.

So they’re pulling the whole macho act of “you jump i jump” “ohhh but then you wont jump” bs and just generally being chickens and not willing to show it.

And because of this they wont let anyone else jump. Like ten people came and left because these jerks wouldnt let anyone else go.

Eventually i get annoyed and snap “either jump or get out of my way!”

And the dude who is obviously the leader just turns and grins at me.

He assumed what i call the “douchebag alpha male pose” hands on hips, crotch foreward, you know the one, and you know the body language that goes with it.

He thinks he’s superior. Now this guy is the biggest of them all.

Massive biceps, raging six pack, the works. The Hulk would probaby do a double take at this dudes size.

And little me is not intimidated in the least.

I learned to fight at a very young age, especially men larger than me. I know if things turns south i can take him no problem. A few hits here and there and he’s out for the count.

He starts walking towards me, and i step forward too. He may be alpha male, but he just crossed an Alpha Female who doesnt back down from a challenge.

Strike one.

He looks over at his pals and says,

“Ohhhh, the little lady’s going to jump, is she?” And he just sneers down at me, all arrogance and misplaced confidence.

Strike two.

“Tell you what, sweetheart.” Ohhh he did not just say that. “You jump, we’ll let you push us.”

Three strikes he’s out he just made the biggest mistake of his life.

I just grin and go “ok” and turn and immediately dive over the edge. Im soaring through the air, enjoying the fall. I turn just in time to see his face go from 😏 to 😧

I smack down into the water grinning. Originally the plan was the swim across the river and meet up with my family, but i am cashing in this bet. Except there’s only one way to get back up to that cliff from here

I scale the side of the cliff with the rope and I can hear them chatting nervously up top

I pop up over the edge and prop myself up on the ledge with the sweetest, most steel-lined smile I can manage and say, “who’s next?”

So Alpha laughs and stands at the edge as I haul myself up. He’s laughing and assuring his buddies he’ll be back in a second cause I wont really do it and–

I straight arm him and he goes flying

He flails and plunges over the edge, shrieking in the most high pitched, terrified shriek Ive ever heard a dude bro make. He sputters to the surface and gapes up at me as I grin like a hellion down at him. I turn to the rest of his jerk buddies and smile.

Oddly enough they all jumped of their own accord

latimes.com
'When you’re black you have to fight': Tinashe, Kehlani and other female R&B artists struggle for attention
Only three black women have topped the charts in the past 10 years. Here's why.
By Gerrick D. Kennedy

Three years ago, all the signs pointed one way: Tinashe was on her way to pop stardom.

In 2012, when she was just 19, she produced two critically acclaimed mixtapes that landed her a deal at RCA. A year later her debut single, “2 On,” made it to No. 24 on Billboard’s Hot 100. Her 2014 debut album, “Aquarius,” was met with critical acclaim and she was nominated for a BET Award.

Since then, the singer-songwriter has toured with Nicki Minaj and Katy Perry, collaborated with Britney Spears, earned praise from idol Janet Jackson and issued two buzzy projects, including last year’s digital-only work “Nightride.”

Yet Tinashe’s career has hit an impasse.

Nearly two years after it was announced to much hype, RCA has yet to release her long-gestating sophomore album, “Joyride.” As a string of genre-hopping singles and collaborations with artists like Spears, Chris Brown and Young Thug failed to produce a major hit, “Joyride” and her young career have stalled.

Attempting a restart, she has learned many things: that pop hits speak louder than reviews, only crossover stars make real money and being a black female performer comes with inherent challenges.

“Critical acclaim hasn’t been enough in my experience,” said the 24-year-old, who was born Tinashe Kachingwe. “The label appreciates it, but the music business, in my perspective, is still so much based on revenue and how much they are making in sales. That’s where it gets really [crappy].”

“You just want to make art for the sake of art,” she continued, “and not have people [care] about a number, first-week sales or things like that.”

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