malama

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prideofgypsies  What’s what??????
http://websta.me/p/973539949351301370_918028867

prideofgypsies  Just wrapped. @protectmaunakea In the middle of nowhere What’s happening with our 31.
http://websta.me/p/973541241599586582_918028867

prideofgypsies  Mahalo @mauloabook @protectmaunakea #wearemaunakea #alohaaina j
http://websta.me/p/973544730555871568_918028867


http://websta.me/p/973564061952012960_918028867

kayanatoler #Regrann from @prideofgypsies - Proud to be kanaka maoli I will do everything in my mana to protect Mauna Kea @therock. @nicolescherzy @kellyslater @kaladacaptain @makuarothman @samoanstuntman @kaui_kauhi @hawanemusic @protectmaunakea @heets7 aloha j

Again, HUGE mahalo to this #KANAKA for coming home to support our people. Everyone knows how busy you must have been, but our mauna and our culture ALWAYS comes first. We love you J, and appreciate all that you have done over the past few days. Hawaii will miss you! Have a safe flight back to LA! #protectmaunakea #aoletmt #tmtshutdown #alohaainapatriots #alohaainawarriors #kuhaaheo #kukiaimauna #kukiaiku

Read more at http://websta.me/tag/kukiaimauna#dIlTuUJGFq5KtAdk.99

Vera Vladimirovna Komstadius, daughter of Vladimir Malama and wife of Nikolay Nikolaevich Komstadius, a Major General in the Imperial Army. She’s related to Yakov Malama, commander of Caucasus, and his son, Dimitri, who was the crush of Tatiana Nikolaevna, daughter of Tsar Nicholas II

She had five children: Sophia, Vera, Maria, Nikolay and Vladimir. In 1920, she and her children left Russia, and settled down in Greece as a part of Grand Duchess Vladimir’s daughter Elena Vladimirovna’s retinue. In 1923, the family moved to France.

Wiliwili (Erythrina sandwicensis)


Before plastic, fiberglass, or epoxy, Wiliwili wood was used to build surfboards, ‘amas for canoes, and floats for fishing nets. As a dry forest specie, Wiliwili are so highly adapted to their environment that they will lose their leaves during summer months to store energy for the next rains. Wiliwili’s name means ‘twisty’ and may refer to how their seed pods twist open to disperse seeds or to the twisting of the Wiliwili’s branches.

A sight so unique and unlike no other the color of the Wiliwili’s bark can vary from grey green and yellow, to orange and dark red. Their flower colors can range from orange to neon green to rare white colors, while their seeds range from light orange to dark red. The flowers and seeds were used in lei, and the leaves of the Wiliwili, when yellow, look like it’s Kumulipo ocean counterpart, the Lauwiliwilinukunukuʻoiʻoi (Longnose or Forceps Butterflyfish).

A Wiliwili’s uniqueness among the landscape makes it a sight worth pointing out for many passing through the dry areas of Hawaiʻi, but as many threats encroach on it’s native habitat -invasive species, human development, climate change and no laws protecting it, Wiliwili are now becoming rare. These trees are worth protecting, not only for the future of Hawaiʻi’s dry forests, but for perpetuating our island culture.

prideofgypsies BOOM timeout. Check it out http://www.staradvertiser.com/news/breaking/298960521.html?id=298960521

Gov. Ige: ‘Timeout’ on Mauna Kea construction


By Star-Advertiser staff

Gov. David Ige said Tuesday that after talking with the University of Hawaii and the Office of Hawaiian Affairs, there will be a “timeout” for about a week on the construction on the $1.4 billion Thirty-Meter Telescope on the summit of Mauna Kea.

At a news conference Tuesday to announce his nominee to lead the Department of Land and Natural Resources, Ige said that he has been in “meaningful discussions” with groups that have an interest in the telescope.

“We agreed there would be value to have some further dialogue on Mauna Kea,” Ige said. “I do know it’s a significant project and this will give us some time to engage in further conversations with the various stakeholders that have an interest in Mauna Kea.

"Last week, Hawaii County Police arrested and cited 31 people for trespassing and blocking work vehicles from reaching the construction site.

Protesters have been holding vigil at the 9,000-foot level, objecting to the construction of what’s being billed as the world’s largest telescope. They say the mountain is sacred and that the 180-foot-tall project is too massive, threatening sacred shrines and burials and the island’s water supply.

The University of Hawaii approved a sublease agreement for about 9 acres leased from the state last year after the state Board of Land and Natural Resources approved the project in 2013 following a seven-year environmental review that featured more than 20 public hearings.

Astronomers say the Thirty Meter Telescope will be the most advanced and powerful optical telescope on earth, capable of viewing galaxies at the edge of the observable universe, near the beginning of time.

Although legal challenges are still pending in court, the Land Board signed off on a notice to proceed with construction March 6, allowing construction equipment to be hauled to the site.