makoto!

I wanted to give a summary of Munakata’s speech to Naegi for people who didn’t understand what he meant:

  • He actually respects Naegi and was impressed with him during the 78 Class Killing Game.
  • I don’t think he actually hates him, but he hates his ideals.
  • He disagrees with Naegi’s viewpoint because, instead of embracing despair, he tries to forget it exists and only holds on to hope.
  • This is a problem for Munakata because, by ignoring despair and only focusing on hope, you are not only setting people up for soul-crushing despair later but you can’t fully appreciate hope.  
  • Munakata, like the rest of the FF, has been through incredible despair. Because he has lived through it, he not only has a greater hatred of despair but a greater appreciation for hope.
  • You can’t have one without the other. Positivity means nothing unless you’ve experienced a greater negativity beforehand. A greater hope comes through despair.
  • He wants to cooperate with Naegi and, once again, respects him. But because Naegi refuses to acknowledge the presence of despair and continues to preach “we can do it if we just hope” he gets angry with him and doesn’t think he deserves the right to say that because he has “all but forgotten the feeling of absolute despair.”
  • Meaning he doesn’t really know what he’s fighting for.
  • Munakata fears Naegi because he is so influential, and he doesn’t want him convincing people that they aren’t going to go through more soul-crushing despair–because they will. It’s a set-up for failure.
  • Basically, he thinks Naegi is giving people “false hope” (hope without despair) while he is giving them “real hope” (hope as a result of despair.)
  • Despair can’t be eradicated through hope alone. Sometimes a greater despair is needed. You have to fight fire with fire.

TL;DR: He is basically a less-emotional, more-logical parallel to not Naegi–but Komaeda.

His views are very Komaeda-like, but there’s an added complexity to it.

anonymous asked:

EVERYONES SO OVERJOYED THAT ASAHINA SURVIVED THAT WE'RE OVERLOOKING THE BIG ISSUE. WHY WOULD THE KILLER DO THAT????? WHY WOULD KODAKA DO THAT??????? FROM WHAT WE KNOW OF HIM, HE WOULDNT JUST DO IT TO TROLL US!!!! SOMETHING IS REALLY REALLY REALLY FISHY I SWEAR!!!!!!

I’m still wrapping my head over this.

I need validation that the whole troll death wasn’t just some cheap gimmick for shock value.

Because honestly, I’d be disappointed if it was just so Kodaka could troll us and that’s just lazy writing which isn’t really his style. I need to know the purpose as to why the killer had to set up Asahina like that and so far I can only think of one reason for it.

It was set up so that the killer/traitor could see Naegi’s reaction.

Yes, it was shock value to us viewers but story-wise, it was shock value SOLELY for Naegi. And maybe the traitor wanted to see exactly that. The despair over his face when he sees his fallen comrade then the brief hope when he realized that she was okay and then the plot twist despair right after as soon as they find an actual corpse. 

The traitor’s having fun with messing with Naegi.

You know where I’m going at with this, right? Miaya’s definitely suspicious.

Again, this is all just speculation. Like you, I’m just trying to understand the underlying purpose of such elaborate set up (if there even is one).

Compilation of MakoHaru moments in Free! Starting Days

[WARNING: LONG-ASS POST CONSISTING OF LOTS OF SCREENCAPS AND SPOILERS]

So I decided to do a post on my favourite MakoHaru moments from the movie and it turned out to be everything_(:3」∠)_

1) Their usual routine:

“Good morning, Haru-chan!”

“I told you not to use ‘chan’.”

Makoto making sure Haru wears his uniform properly.

Makoto fetching Haru to school and being familiar with Haru-mama.

 2)  Makoto being playful (flirting) with Haru

“How did you know I was there?”

“I know everything about Haru.”

“…Though I’d like to say that, I actually heard it from Auntie.”

3)  Haru not being pleased about Makoto switching from “boku” (more childlike manner) to “ore” (more mature) when referring to himself.

 “Ore?”

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