making this was a struggle and a half

anonymous asked:

So one of Bill's fantasies of Dipper is that he's a submissive, pliant and even more lustful husband who worships the grounds Bill walks on complete with a revealing slave outfit? Wouldn't that fantasy contradict with his real enjoyment of the rebellious, sarcastic and equally capable Dipper in real life?

This is one of those things that’s fun for Bill to fantasize about. He wouldn’t want that all the time, or he’d get bored of Dipper fast. But the idea of Dipper doing it has a thrill to it, because it’d be exotic coming from his feisty little mortal.

Dipper actually doing any of that would quickly kill any fun about Bill’s fantasy, if only because Bill would be out to find out what screwed up his nice defiant human.

sillyfudgemonkeys  asked:

cont... Like Ken, Akihiko, and Ryoji all have flags and then Shinjiro you have to go out of your way to spend one more night with him. Also Minato can romance non-party member SLs, while the FeMC, again, can't. I dunno I just like how both MCs are polar opposite even to this small of a detail, and I just found it interesting that Atlus even put effort into making their SLs polar opposites too in terms of how you romance people. ^^; Really adds another layer of personalities to the MCs!

I assume half of your message was lost in sending, thanks tumblr, but I can tell what this is about, and I agree; The touches in P3P to distinguish the two paths in personality through their protagonists was handled very well, especially because in both paths, you can still tell that the protagonists are struggling with their traumatic past, though both do in polar opposite ways; MaleMC by withdrawing from the world and acting distant/snarky, and FeMC by being overly outgoing and cheery (which also results in her being far more aggresive and vengeful, as shown in how many of her dialogue options have her openly ready to use violence to solve her problems AND how she actually has the option to finish off Takaya and kill him after the last battle against him, while MaleMC does not.)

Really, these subtle touches seem to be hallmarks of the writing of Azusa Kido, the writer responsible for most of the Social Links of Persona 4, as well as the entire script of Persona Q. Kido was in charge of writing and directing Persona 3 Portable, so all the strengths of her writing show marvelously in the FeMC route. I was actually kind of sad to find out she wasn’t quite as involved in the writing of P5, though I get why; since she was busy doing pretty much all of PQ on her own when P5 was in the process of being written, it only makes sense she couldn’t have had that much of a hand in writing the main story (she still wrote a lot of the Confidantes, though).

/EndNeniSwooningOverOneOfHerIdols

negative reviews about power rangers hurt my feelings personally and then i look and see it was written by a white dude and i know he’s just mad that it wasn’t a story all about white people, so with that in mind, here’s a list of why white nerdboys hate this movie and why you should go see it!! mild spoilers!!

  • only one white ranger (jason, red), and while he’s the leader, his screentime was not significantly greater than his teammates, nor was his background the most fleshed out. he also suffers real consequences for his poor choices instead of being let off with a slap on the wrist. 
  • half indian ranger (kimberly, pink) who makes a very bad choice that is very cruel, who is not coddled. she is told that her choice was bad, point blank, but that she can still be a good person. reformed mean girl!!! and she’s not a white blonde!!!
  • mexican ranger (trini, yellow) who is LGBT (we don’t know if she’s bi or a lesbian but i’m guessing she’s a lesbian).
  • chinese ranger (zack, black) who is bilingual, showing the struggles and pressures of a kid who is responsible for caring for a single parent who is sick and struggles financially.
  • black ranger (billy, blue) who is autistic, and actually says the words “i’m on the spectrum” in the film instead of dancing around it. is the heart and soul of the team, his friends treat him completely normally.
  • NO ROMANCE!!!! there are slight hints but seeing as the events of the film span roughly two weeks, the film is all about friendship and sacrifice and acceptance, not about teen love.
  • i’m dead serious go see this goddamn movie i cried like ten times and was absolutely amazed by how they took this cheesy little show from the 90s and gave it so much heart and love.

i really love it when mixed race actors play characters who acknowledge they’re mixed (even if they have physical traits that don’t make their heritage obvious) like i love in parks and rec that april speaks spanish and talks about being puerto rican, i love how rainbow in blackish struggles with her biracial identity, i love how koen in cleverman feels disconnected from his people because his mother is white and vanessa hudgens’ character in powerless is also half Filipino - i love that this is happening more and more because growing up as mixed, so often you see mixed people in media and they’re portrayed as one or the other and its so important we create media that doesn’t encourage internalized racism and encourages mixed kids to accept their identities are both whole and multifaceted i just hope we see more mixed representation for mixed poc as well as poc mixed with white 

Period Struggles Compilation For No Particular Reason

giant blood diaper

the bathroom stinks to hell for a week

sneezing

coughing

laughing

yet somehow crying my eyes out doesn’t cause debilitating pain

speaking of - CRAMPS

ALL OF THE CRAMPS

SERIOUSLY IT FEELS LIKE THAT METAL HEAD-THINGY THAT GIRL WORE IN THE FIRST SAW MOVIE IS AROUND MY HIPS

googling ways to relieve cramps and seeing pictures of women all folded up like human pretzels like what human being can actually do that with a pad on wtf

saying “fuck” every three minutes 

it’s 3 in the morning and I’m standing here in my underwear washing blood out of my pajamas literally fuck everything 

wtf these aren’t my usual pads what’s this bullshit why do these even exist

then when I get my period in a hotel and they give me cheap, crappy pads with no goddamn wings what the fuck kind of customer service is this

*drops something* *tries to pick it up without bending over*

*in the shower* is that dust or blood clots

oh hey look there’s blood on the floor again

*wakes up in a panic* IS THERE BLOOD ON MY SHEETS

oh good there’s nothing

*wakes up again two minutes later* BUT IS THERE BL—

*lies awake in bed all night convinced I’ve got a leak*

*one time, just one time, has a peaceful night’s sleep* *wakes up with a leak*

that weird feeling like you’re being stabbed in the vagina by tiny people with tiny swords

that other weird feeling like a zombie bit you inside your uterus and now it’s slowly rotting from the inside out

no I’m not exaggerating that’s exactly what it feels like

crying for no reason

did i mention giant blood diaper

because it’s literally a giant blood diaper

maxi pads. fucking maxi pads. 

hey if i jump out that window will i die 

lying in bed, curled into a tight ball, praying for the sweet embrace of death

pink painkillers 

all of the hot water bottles 

but let’s be real that shit doesn’t work 

neither do the painkillers tbh 

so then I come home and collapse onto my bed and suddenly my dog is there sniffing my butt like seriously as if this wasn’t embarrassing enough already

“alright class today we’ll warm up by running around the field” *screams* 

every time you sit out during the swimming unit in pe and the pe teachers side-eye you the whole time

plus all the girl’s periods synch up so like half the class is sitting on the bleachers dying on the inside and the pe teachers think it’s all a big conspiracy 

“you know they have invented solutions for this exact problem”

^no lie, my science teacher told us this last month. everyone just stared at him in silence until he changed the topic. 

can I get a sick note for my period?

when you have to change in the middle of class and you try to discreetly take your bag with you and everyone looks up

“hey can you check if there’s blood on my pants” 

“if you hate pads so much why don’t you try a tampon” oh yes sure let me just shove a tiny cotton stick up my vagina that sounds pleasant

when you complain about your period to the squad and suddenly half of the boys have disappeared off the face of the earth 

*displays slightest hint of irritation after being provoked for a prolonged period of time*  “geez someone’s on their period”

“looks like someone bought the wrong tampon brand lol”

no

no don’t make jokes about that

that shit is the worst

To quote iiSuperwomanii: “My shedding uterus has standards.” 

trying to open your pad as quietly as possible but you know the other girls in the school bathroom can hear

then you come out of the stall and make eye contact in the mirror and tHeY KnOw

AND HOW THE FUCK

DOES MY PERIOD SOMEHOW ALWAYS KNOW

WHEN TO COME AT THE EXACT MOST INCONVENIENT TIME?? 

oh it’s your birthday? here’s a fun present!

oh it’s christmas? guess who’s not going sledding 

oh you’re being sent on a six-hour hike on your school trip in a mountain with no bathrooms? this seems like a good time for satan’s waterfall 

oh you were looking forward to a nice, relaxed half-term break? lol bitch not anymore

*cries internally*

*cries externally*

*cries eternally*


I hope this has been educational 

Top Misconceptions People Have about Pulp-Era Science Fiction

A lot of people I run into have all kinds of misconceptions about what pulp-era scifi, from the 1920s-1950s, was actually like. 


“Pulp-Era Science Fiction was about optimistic futures.”

Optimistic futures were always, always vastly outnumbered by end of the world stories with mutants, Frankenstein creations that turn against us, murderous robot rebellions, terrifying alien invasions, and atomic horror. People don’t change. Then as now, we were more interested in hearing about how it could all go wrong. 

To quote H.L. Gold, editor of Galaxy Science Fiction, in 1952: 

“Over 90% of stories submitted to Galaxy Science Fiction still nag away at atomic, hydrogen and bacteriological war, the post atomic world, reversion to barbarism, mutant children killed because they have only ten toes and fingers instead of twelve….the temptation is strong to write, ‘look, fellers, the end isn’t here yet.’”

The movie Tomorrowland is a particulary egregious example of this tremendous misconception (and I can’t believe Brad Bird passed on making Force Awakens to make a movie that was 90 minutes of driving through the Florida swamps). In reality, pre-1960s scifi novels trafficked in dread, dystopian futures, and fear. There was simply never a time when optimistic scifi was overrepresented, even the boyish Jules Verne became skeptical of the possibilities of technology all the way at the turn of the century. One of the most famous pulp scifi yarns was Jack Williamson’s The Humanoids, about a race of Borg-like robots who so totally micromanage humans “for our own protection” that they leave us with nothing to do but wait “with folded hands.”


“Pulp scifi often featured muscular, large-chinned, womanizing main characters.”

Here’s the image often used in parodies of pulp scifi: the main character is a big-chinned, ultra-muscular dope in tights who is a compulsive womanizer and talks like Adam West in Batman. Whenever I see this, I think to myself…what exactly is it they’re making fun of?

It’s more normal than you think to find parodies of things that never actually existed. Mystery buffs and historians, for example, can’t find a single straight example of “the Butler did it.” It’s a thing people think is a thing that was never a thing, and another example would be the idea of the “silent film villain” in a mustache and top hat (which there are no straight examples of, either). There are no non-parody examples of Superman changing in a phone booth; he just never did this.

In reality, my favorite description of pulp mag era science fiction heroes is that they are “wisecracking Anglo-Saxon engineers addicted to alcohol and tobacco who like nothing better than to explain things to others that they already know.” The average pulp scifi hero had speech patterns best described as “Mid-Century American Wiseass” than like Adam West or the Lone Ranger. 

The nearest the Spaceman Spiff stereotype came to hitting the mark was with the magazine heroes of the Lensmen and Captain Future, and they’re both nowhere near close. Captain Future was a muscular hero with a chin, but he also had a Captain Picard level desire to use diplomacy first, and believed that most encounters with aliens were only hostile due to misunderstandings and lack of communication (and the story makes him right). He also didn’t seem interested in women, mostly because he had better things to do for the solar system and didn’t have the time for love. The Lensmen, on the other hand, had a ruthless, bloodthirsty streak, and were very much like the “murder machine” Brock Sampson (an attitude somewhat justified by the stakes in their struggle). 


“Pulp Era Scifi were mainly action/adventure stories with good vs. evil.” 

This is a half-truth, since, like so much other genre fiction, scifi has always been sugared up with fight scenes and chases. And there was a period, early in the century, when most scifi followed the Edgar Rice Burroughs model and were basically just Westerns or swashbucklers with different props, ray guns instead of six-shooters. But the key thing to remember is how weird so much of this scifi was, and that science fiction, starting in the mid-1930s, eventually became something other than just adventure stories with different trappings. 

One of my favorite examples of this is A. Bertram Chandler’s story, “Giant-Killer.” The story is about rats on a starship who acquire intelligence due to proximity to the star drive’s radiation, and who set about killing the human crew one by one. Another great example is Eando Binder’s Adam Link stories, told from the point of view of a robot who is held responsible for the death of his creator.

What’s more, one of the best writers to come out of this era is best known for never having truly evil bad guys: Isaac Asimov. His “Caves of Steel,” published in 1953, had no true villains. The Spacers, who we assumed were snobs, only isolated themselves because they had no immunities to the germs of earth.


“Racism was endemic to the pulps.”

It is absolutely true that the pulps reflected the unconscious views of society as a whole at the time, but as typical of history, the reality was usually much more complex than our mental image of the era. For instance, overt racism was usually shown as villainous: in most exploration magazines like Adventure, you can typically play “spot the evil asshole we’re not supposed to like” by seeing who calls the people of India “dirty monkeys” (as in Harold Lamb). 

Street & Smith, the largest of all of the pulp publishers, had a standing rule in the 1920s-1930s to never to use villains who were ethnic minorities because of the fear of spreading race hate by negative portrayals. In fact, in one known case, the villain of Resurrection Day was going to be a Japanese General, but the publisher demanded a revision and he was changed to an American criminal. Try to imagine if a modern-day TV network made a rule that minority groups were not to be depicted as gang bangers or drug dealers, for fear that this would create prejudice when people interact with minority groups in everyday life, and you can see how revolutionary this policy was. It’s a mistake to call this era very enlightened, but it’s also a mistake to say everyone born before 1970 was evil.


“Pulp scifi writers in the early days were indifferent to scientific reality and played fast and loose with science.”

 FALSE.

 This is, by an order of magnitude, the most false item on this list.

In fact, you might say that early science fiction fandom were obsessed with scientific accuracy to the point it was borderline anal retentive. Nearly every single one of the lettercols in Astounding Science Fiction were nitpickers fussing about scientific details. In fact, modern scifi fandom’s grudging tolerance for storytelling necessities like sound in space at the movies, or novels that use “hyperspace” are actually something of a step down from what the culture around scifi was in the 1920s-1950s. Part of it was due to the fact that organized scifi fandom came out of science clubs; Hugo Gernsback created the first scifi pulp magazine as a way to sell electronics and radio equipment to hobbyists, and the “First Fandom” of the 1930s were science enthusiasts who talked science first and the fiction that speculated about it second.

In retrospect, a lot of it was just plain obvious insecurity: in a new medium considered “kid’s stuff,” they wanted to show scifi was plausible, relevant, and something different from “fairy tales.” It’s the same insecure mentality that leads video gamers to repeatedly ask if games are art. You’ve got nothing to prove there, guys, calm down (and take it from a pulp scifi aficionado, the most interesting things are always done in the period when a medium is considered disposable trash). 

One of the best examples was the famous Howard P. Lovecraft, who published “The Shadow out of Time” in the 1936 issue of Astounding. Even though it might be the only thing from that issue that is even remotely reprinted today, the letters page from this issue practically rose up in revolt against this story as not being based on accurate science. Lovecraft was never published in Astounding ever again.

If you ever wanted to find out what Star Wars would be like if they were bigger hardasses about scientific plausibility, check out E.E. Smith’s Lensman series. People expect a big, bold, brassy space opera series with heroes and villains to play fast and loose, but it was shockingly scientifically grounded.

To be fair, science fiction was not a monolith on this. One of the earliest division in science fiction was between the Astounding Science Fiction writers based in New York, who often had engineering and scientific backgrounds and had left-wing (in some cases, literally Communist) politics, and the Amazing Stories writers based in the Midwest, who were usually self taught, and had right-wing, heartland politics. Because the Midwestern writers in Amazing Stories were often self-taught, they had a huge authority problem with science and played as fast and loose as you could get. While this is true, it’s worth noting science fiction fandom absolutely turned on Amazing Stories for this, especially when the writers started dabbling with spiritualism and other weirdness like the Shaver Mystery. And to this day, it’s impossible to find many Amazing Stories tales published elsewhere.

AU where all of Homestuck is some sort of tv or movie series where all the trolls and humans are actually trolls and humans, but they’re all just actors dealing with the bullshit lines they have to do..

Karkat yelling himself hoarse for all of his lines and constantly needing to take lozenges and water and stuff because he keeps straining his voice in character.

Mituna just getting frustrated over all his lines being so nonsensical so he just bullshit ad-libs more than half of it into gibberish nonsense, yet it still makes the cut.

Supreme pun characters like Nepeta, Horuss, Feferi, and Meenah collaborating because they’re just told to read the scripts and force in as many puns as they can think of.

Eridan and Cronus constantly struggling with their wwavvy vwawvy accents being kept in place while they’re talking. (ws and vs are hard. it’s hard and no one understands)

Dave having to stop constantly because he keeps losing his stoic face and voice from so many of the lines he has to say. Same with Jake who constantly mocks his own character when not on set.

Gamzee tripping over his own lines because he’s getting the way his words are pronounced screwy because he talks so weird.

Damara actually speaking Japanese and she sometimes just speaks Japanese off-set to screw with people and they aren’t sure if she’s flirting or just messing with them in character.

Fucking Kankri having to memorize entire monologues of text when he speaks and having to stop because he’s just so done with so much of what he has to say. Plus deals with the same voice exhaustion problems Karkat does.

The Performative Wokeness of Dear White People

“I plan to marry me a dark-skinned sister. Have the ashiest, blackest babies possible.” Says the character of Reggie (Marques Richardson) to his group of friends as they’re taking a stroll on the campus of Winchester University, the fictional university set in the world of Dear White People. Reggie’s proclamation came during a conversation about the character of Sam’s (Logan Browning) new white boyfriend.

The statement echoes a conversation that Sam has earlier in the series with her group of friends where she says that she prefers her men like she prefers her coffee “full-bodied with preferably Keyan origins.” Prompting Muffy (Caitlin Carver) to ask Sam, in Muffy’s words, “a dumb white girl question,” why it would be racist if Muffy was to only date white men, but not racist for Sam to only date black men. Sam goes onto explain that there are parts of her identity that white men will never understand in the ways a black man could. However, Sam does eventually start dating a white guy named Gabe (John Patrick Amedori), who only after being outed on his Instagram account, does she go public with.

Sam’s relationship with a white man becomes a point of contention for many of her closest friends, sparking an ongoing discussion in the series of whether a black person can really be pro-black, while also having a white significant other.

Reggie’s politics, however, are never challenged in the same ways that Sam’s are. His declaration of love for dark-skinned women, is dead upon arrival considering that the only other thing that he is known for outside of his pro-blackness, is his crush on Sam. A light-skinned biracial woman.

Based on the 2014 movie of the same name, Dear White People is a satire set at a PWI about college campus politics through the lens of black students. The show also explores the theme of identity. How often people assume identities or have identities projected onto them that contradicts who they really are. Identities such as being“woke.”

Used to describe a person who is socially and politically conscious, the word “woke” has surged in popularity within recent years due to social media and the rise of social movements such as Black Lives Matter. But what once was a way to describe someone’s political awareness, being, or staying woke, has seemingly dissolved more into a competition of who is more educated on race and other social issues.

Performative wokeness is examined within the world of Dear White People, with episode five featuring a scene where Reggie shows off an app he created called Woke or Not. The app shows photos of students at Winchester University and with a push of a button app users can determine whether a person is woke. Or not.

Even though Dear White People pokes fun at the absurdity and arrogance that comes from people who think they have the moral authority to decide who is or isn’t woke, the show itself falls into many of the same traps that it attempts to satirize.

In an episode centered around Gabe, he’s sitting at a table surrounded by Sam and other black women while they discuss white male privilege and how women of color are often passed over for opportunities that usually end up being given to mediocre white men. While he’s silently listening on, Gabe imagines himself banging his fist against the table as he looks directly into the camera and exclaims that sometimes people actually earn the things they get and that just because he’s a white man doesn’t make him an “asshole.”

“Asshole,” of course, seems just a tad bit reductive considering that being an “asshole” in this scenario is about benefiting from a society that prioritizes average white men over hard working black women. While the narrator says that only “a tiny part” of Gabe wishes he could make such a statement, it’s still concerning that Gabe, who is supposedly enlightened on issues of racism and sexism, is secretly harboring resentment against women of color for venting their frustrations about the institutions that systematically hold them back from opportunities

Is it possible that Gabe is being used as a conduit to discuss liberal racism? After all, episode five deals with how even “good” white people can be guilty of the same racism that they like to think they’re above. But this wasn’t Gabe’s first time making racially tone deaf statements without being taken to task. In the first episode, Gabe tells Sam that he wouldn’t let his friends make her feel like she didn’t belong in his “world,” after Gabe’s first uncomfortable meeting with Sam’s friends where he made a series of half-hearted attempts at trying to relate to the struggles of black students.  

 However, the most egregious occurrence of Dear White People’s lack of self awareness about their own performative wokeness comes with their handling of discussions surrounding colorism.  

The most improved upon element from Dear White People the movie is the colorism. In the movie, the character of Coco (Teyonah Parris,) a dark-skinned black woman, existed solely as a foil to Tessa Thompson’s version of Sam, a light-skinned biracial woman. With the movie being turned into a series, we see Coco, now played by Antoinette Robertson, develop into a fleshed out, fully realized character. But even with the series upgrading on the movie’s shortcomings, even going as far as calling Sam out on her light-skin privilege, the series began developing flaws of their own in regards to its colorism.

Joelle (Ashley Blaine Featherson) outside of being Sam’s best friend, also has feelings for Reggie, the guy who has feelings for Sam. This scenario is reminiscent to a flashback scene in episode four in which Coco longingly looks on as Troy, (Brandon Bell) a guy she has feelings for, flirt with Sam. Even though in that particular situation, the scene was a part of an episode that explores Coco’s relationship to colorism and how it affects her love life, the same motivation doesn’t appear to be behind the love triangle of Sam, Joelle, and Reggie.

The fact that the only light-skinned biracial woman of the show is constantly shown as the object of affection, while the two principle dark-skinned women of the show are depicted as coveting over color struck black men who constantly overlook them for said light-skinned biracial woman is disheartening to watch.

What makes this even more disheartening, is the fact that Joelle was walking right beside Reggie, struggling to contain her smile, as he declared that he was going to “marry him a dark-skinned sister,” only later to hook up with Sam. But Joelle, nor does anyone else, call him out about how his preference doesn’t align with who we actually see him dating.

Has Dear White People found itself stuck in the same tiny confines of identity that it sought out to expose through its characters? Can the contradictions that arise within the show merely be chalked up to poor writing? Or does it prove that inconsistency will inevitably happen when trying to voice the concerns of multiple people with varying opinions? A light skin woman can not speak to the struggles of colorism that a dark skin woman faces. A white man can’t relate to the problems a black man has. And one show cannot voice the opinions of all within a community.

I loved her,” he said,
“I think a part of me always will love her. She made me feel alive and after 19 years on this planet I finally felt like someone understood me, I don’t believe in soul mates much but I do believe that I was meant to meet her. But months passed and she tried so hard to make me a better person because lord knows I didn’t treat her half as good as I should’ve. I loved her but I struggled to show it, I struggled to let anyone in enough for them to know me because I was too damn afraid of letting someone fuck me up even more than I already am. So instead I had to let her go and my god I won’t ever forget the look on her face or how much her eyes glistened from the tears she was trying to hold back when I told her I was leaving.
But I had to let her go because I knew what was best for her, and it wasn’t me.
—  Excerpt of a book I’ll never write

I don’t think people realize what rare and beautiful gifts really good full AMVs are.

Like… that’s hard. Really, really hard.

Something I’ve learned is that the longer you’ve been editing, the more time it takes to make an edit, which is probably the reason AMVs can take literal months to make, and most vidders usually cut the songs down and/or make short edits.

To keep up consistently good timing, clip choice, pacing, transitions, effects, and possibly even masking or typography over give or take three and a half minutes of song is a huge challenge.

It’s generally considered to take three hours to edit one minute of a movie. Apply that here, and we have it taking about nine hours for a fairly short AMV… and given that we don’t get paid to make these, and have to wrestle with hitting every single beat of the song, it can take much longer.

And we also have to keep our motivation up, find time to edit, not grow to detest the song, and struggle with technical difficulties. All of that is really grating.

I’ve been editing for a couple months over a year now, and, while I started out making almost exclusively full AMVs, I can’t do that anymore. I’ve improved a lot, and by this point, using the whole song is intimidating and requires a level of dedication that I could not possibly achieve every time I edit.

It’s been literally a year since the last time I’ve edited a full-length song that I didn’t trim.

So if you find an awesome full AMV, appreciate it! Tell the vidder that you love it!

I’m honestly just so in awe of AMVs and the people who edit them. Vidders are really badass.

Cherish them and their work.

Obey (Sub!Jimin Smut)

Pairing: Jimin x Reader

Genre: Smut (Mother Mary help)

Warnings: SMUT DEAR GOD SMUT, dirty talk, Sub!Jimin, Dom!Reader, orgasm denial, overstimulation, ass play, swearing, bondage

Word Count: 5586

Wow okay so I read @seokvie‘s and @btssmutgalore‘s sub!Jimin fics and they inspired me to write my own. I’m decently proud of this, considering I have 0 experience writing something like this. Thank you to @jin-oppa for gushing about this topic with me and @fortheloveofsuga for just being a good person in general.


Many would look at your boyfriend’s sharp jaw, thickly muscled thighs, and chiseled face and assume that he was dominant in bed. Rough, even. Jimin did, indeed, carry himself with straight shoulders and his head held high–long legs carrying him confidently across the room as his dark eyes zeroed in on something in the distance. He would present you out in public as if you were a work of art, his thick hand pressed into the small of your back and his full lips grazing your temple. If ever any other man raked their eyes down your body, his warm eyes would harden to stony obsidian orbs–either lowering his hand to rest on your ass or keeping direct eye contact with the potential threat as he brushed his lips across the expanse of your neck. Your boyfriend dominated you in romance, indeed. But you had a secret.

Park Jimin was not dominant in the bedroom.

He would occasionally play the dom role, his jaw clenching and nostrils flaring as he rammed into you from behind–leanly muscled chest pressed against your back as he leaned over you to growl obscenities in your ear through gritted teeth. When he was angry, he would pull your hair and bring you so close to the edge that you could feel yourself beginning to tip over, just before he would yank you back again. But that was only when he was so furious that he was seeing red.

Most of the time, he preferred to wholeheartedly submit himself to you. He thrived off of your praise, the little phrase “Good boy” nearly flinging him off the edge and into an orgasm any time you breathed the words into his hair. He loved to be tied up, and teased, and spanked until he was begging you to let him cum. He adored it when you tortured him with sucking on his cock long past he was finished, the mixture of pain and pleasure drawing him nearer to yet another release.

It wasn’t always so extreme, but there were nights when he needed to be controlled and you needed to control him.

Tonight was one of those nights.

Keep reading

the aclu doesn’t need your money

in college, i was an unpaid intern of aclu’s immigrants’ rights project. the project was working on a class action lawsuit against prolonged detention of immigrants, but there were only 4(?) attorneys and the two head attorneys were rich white people who couldn’t deign to address us. everyday, the aclu would receive long letters from detainees describing their unjust situations. i thought about how these people had to put in scarce resources in order to write these letters, probably because the aclu had some PR campaign or other making it seem like that would be a useful thing for them to do, and how they had no idea the only person who would read their letters was the unpaid college intern. after summarizing the info in a database, i would send the detainees a slipshod photocopy of smaller non-profits in their state that might be able to help them.

they do some necessary work, but definitely nothing near as much as they are paid for and credited for. their ceo is paid HALF A MILLION DOLLARS in salary, others are paid hundreds of thousands of dollars. they are super corporate and hierarchical, super elitist and white. donate to smaller non-profits who need your money, not the ones who have the PR resources to make themselves the face of the struggle. liberals make fun of poor white conservatives for looking to a racist billionaire to save them, but if liberals allow non-profits whose leaders are part of the 1% (planned parenthood ceo makes $600,000) to dictate the terms of anti-trump resistance, what will that resistance ultimately achieve? also these big non-profits are shot through with funding from large foundations like Ford with a committment to deradicalizing social movements. stay skeptical.

did anyone else notice when tony knocks steve down toward the end of the fight in siberia, and steve struggles to drag himself back to his feet, and we cut to a wider shot that makes everyone, but especially steve, look so fucking small, and it’s like steve is a little guy in brooklyn again fighting off the bullies, and he stands up and wobbles a bit just like he did in that scene in catfa, but his eyes are hard as steel when they meet tony’s, and he says, for the thousandth time, i can do this all day

then, even though he’s laid out on the cold stone, beaten and bloody and broken, even though he’s half-unconscious and he just lost his goddamn arm fighting tony, bucky takes steve’s words like a cue, drags himself toward tony as best he can, and his best isn’t that great right now, but it’s enough, because he grabs tony’s ankle and tony’s distracted from steve, turning around to fight off a defenseless bucky, which gives steve the opening he needs

did anyone else notice that even though he’s totally shattered and half-dead himself, bucky jumps into this fight same as the one we saw way back in 1943, same as all the other fights steve started back in brooklyn but couldn’t finish alone; did anyone else notice that even though this whole fight was about steve saving bucky, in the end, it was still bucky who saved steve?

Practice

Requested by @captaindanindlovu​. I hope you like it!

Summary: Jared Padalecki x reader. Gen gives Jared and the reader permission to do what they’d like.

Warning: Smut, dry humping

Word Count: 2500

A/N: I’m still new to this RPF thing, so I hope y’all enjoy this! XOXO


Sex scenes aren’t the most comfortable scenes to shoot.

Sex scenes are even more uncomfortable when you’re shooting in front of the guy’s wife, who just happens to be visiting and has been given permission to be on the closed set.

Sex scenes are even more uncomfortable when you’re trying to get over the attraction you’ve developed to said married guy.

And sex scenes are incredibly uncomfortable when the married guy who you’re simulating sex with gets an erection. In front of the visiting wife.

Keep reading

Invisibility is Not a Privilege.

Invisibility means every person you come out to requires a vocabulary lesson.

Invisibility means the very nature of your identity is up for debate.

Invisibility means years feeling alone, broken, and unnatural.

Invisibility means you might not even consider the possibility that you’re anything but what society says you can be.

Invisibility means you have to find out about your own identity from strangers in small, distant corners of the internet.

Invisibility means being taught in school that your orientation makes you inhuman.

Invisibility means being told by educated professionals that your orientation is pathological, a mental illness, and Must Be Fixed.

Invisibility means taking an extra year to convince yourself that your orientation could even exist before you even beginning to accept yourself as what you are.

Invisibility means coming up with an arsenal of excuses for your lack of Normality, an army of justifications for living a life that makes you just a little more comfortable.

Invisibility means “acceptance” comes at the price of breaking up and stuffing away the things that make you you, and struggling to force yourself into a hole that doesn’t fit.

Invisibility means forcing yourself into relationships and acts that you don’t want because the alternative is taboo.

Invisibility means you can never really tell them who you are.

Invisibility means you can’t even feel pride in your community half the time, because the world is intent on destroying what little of a community there is.

Invisibility means facing a world of people who would have you bow your head and let them rewrite your identity for you; who demand your complacence while they redefine the things that make you who you are.

Invisibility means your suffering doesn’t even matter to those supposedly fighting to End All Suffering.

Invisibility means shame.

Invisibility means denial.

Invisibility means loneliness.

Invisibility is not a privilege.

On Fury Road and the value of non-threatening male heroes

So I’ve been re-watching Fury Road and something struck me;

Tom Hardy’s Max is just really non-threatening. Now, that’s weird on a surface level because in story he’s presented as very dangerous. But here’s the thing about the kind of men we’re used to seeing in action movie; They are threatening in their masculinity.

The capitol A Action hero is a fixture in our cultural awareness. Almost without fail this hero is a man (if you have a woman in the role of action hero, it’s almost always proceeded by her gender. She can’t just be the action hero, she is very clearly cast as a FEMALE action hero.) So our male Action hero  is a badass. He’s dangerous, he’s brooding, he’s tough as nails. Sometimes he’s sarcastic and witty, sometimes he’s a moody stud. Point is, despite cultural changes that we see with our Action heroes as different pop culture trends change the flavoring, these men are all pretty much cut from the same mold. And here’s the thing about your typical Action hero; They have this underlying current of threatening masculinity. To put it bluntly, your typical Action hero is really all about cock. They’re intimidating to both their male peers and the women who are cast opposite them. They are toxic masculinity distilled onto our screens.

Now, in recent years we’ve been seeing more varity in our Action heroes. More emotion. Of course, there have always been exceptions (Luke Skywalker is one of the most note worthy male heroes to break this mold, and I think it’s worth noting that he’s often called whiny. Hell, when I was a little kid I loved him, but as a young teenager I thought he was lame. Now I realize that this might well have been because he wasn’t acting like your typical male hero. Maybe that scared me on some level) Anyway, let’s get back to Hardy’s Max. In story he  starts out as frightening, but he is never threatening in the way of your usual Action hero. He’s feral, dangerous, and unpredictable at the start of our story, but he doesn’t have any of that toxic masculinity.  So, we have a mad Max who is dangerous, and seems mad, as it were.  But there’s none of that hyper male Action hero posturing.

Hardy’s Max is a flawed man whose past has almost driven him past the point of no return. To the other characters in the movies he initially seems to be  feral (they don’t have the benefit of hearing his inner thoughts) Max is a frightening, but he’s not a masculine he-man. In fact, the characters in the movie who fall close to what we’re used to seeing in Action heroes are the warboys and their leader. The culture espoused by Immortan Joe is hyper masculine and toxic. The young men who idolize him seem like extreme versions of what we’re used to with our heroes. They’re brainwashed into a society built on toxic masculinity and objectification, and the heroes of the story are the ones fighting against this idea. Interestingly, Furiosa has a lot of traits of your traditional Action hero, but it’s coupled with compassion and self reflection, not because she’s a woman, but because  she’s  a person. Like Max, she is fighting to regain her humanity through helping a group of young women fight for their freedom from a world of toxic masculinity.

So, again back to Max himself. As the movie goes on he regains his sense of self. A big theme int he movie is the objectification and commodification of human life. We see this with Immortan Joe’s ‘wives” as well as with the brainwashed warboys and the use living humans as ‘bloodbags’ and ‘milkers’ Max starts the movie literally strapped to the hood of a car as a hood ornament/living blood bag.  Max is reluctant to help Furiosa and the ‘wives’ at first, but we see him change in a brief period of time. He  regains his humanity through helping others and coming to terms with his own demons. Hardy’s Max is dangerous, but he’s also vulnerable, undeniably so. We see his fear, we see what haunts him, and we see him struggle to survive, and then struggle to come to terms with his past in order to help others have a future. This sets him apart from Mel Gibson’s Max, and in my opinion makes him the better of the two. By the time Max starts really showing his human side, we see a man who is compassionate and half broken, a man who relearns himself by helping others.

Another notable aspect of Max is his relationship with Furiosa. Usually when your typical Action hero is paired with a STRONG INDEPENDENT WOMAN in a movie, there’s this ongoing dynamic of ‘but you’re a girlllllll’ There isn’t respect, because the heroes of the story are acting out the deeply felt internalized misogyny of our own society. They can’t interact as equals because in our cultural minds they are inherently unequal. They are defined by their rigid gender rules, and they act this out like they’re children on a playground crying about cooties. And of course, there’s usually the sexual element, with the heroes constantly griping at/disrespecting one another while it’s played off as repressed attraction all along.Fury Road never once does this. Max and Furiosa are two flawed and broken people trying to survive. There isn’t a split second where Max stops to wonder how a GIRL can be so tough. Once they’re established as allies, they immediately move into a working relationship built on mutual respect and trust. Two scenes come to mind. Firstly, the initial canon chase when Max first shows himself as an ally. There’s one notable moment where Furiosa is standing up out of the roof and Max hands her a gun. That doesn’t seem important, but there’s something about that gesture that’s very c cinematically important. It shows us that they’re a team now, and it shows us that they trust each other. The second notable scene is the “Don’t breathe” moment in the night bog. Max has previously seen that Furiosa is a good shot. He knows that she is the one to trust with this task, so he hands her the gun and lets her use him as a rifle stand. It’s a moment with no dialogue that speaks volumes.

All of this goes to Max as a nonthreatening hero. He never objectifies, disrespects, or distrusts his counterpart. He’s never an alpha male. He’s part of a story that he doesn’t need to dominate with his manly male maleness. Hardy’s Max is a dangerous, vulnerable, and quietly compassionate man who gives respect and trust where it’s due. He has no need to parade and prove his masculinity. In fact, the people doing that are the villains, and isn’t that telling?

Context: Our group was on the way to a town a bit farther away. Our Rogue did not want to walk all the way, so e suggested to simply wait for a carriage and hijack it. The first few carriages are dismissed by the whole party, by the last one, the rogue is getting desperate and definitely wants to hijack it. 

The carriage turns out to be a man and his obviously pregnant wife. They consider to stop, but don’t. We then get informed that this might be due to the presence of a gnome (me) and their fear of changelings. 

Me: So, what shall we do, throw me at the woman?
Rogue: That’s a great idea. (Turning to DM) I wanna throw the gnome at the wife.
DM: (turns to me) Okay, roll for Initiative then, to see of you have the chance to struggle… 
Me: Actually, I am totally okay with getting thrown at the wife.
DM: …You’re okay with it. Alright (turning to Rogue) roll for strength then.
Rogue: (completely messes up the strength roll) 
DM: So, the gnome is not even close to getting thrown at the wife. Roll for reflex. 
Me: (rolls a nat1) So that means what now?
DM: You hit the wheel face first and get stuck in it. The carriage is still going further. 
Half-orc: Well, I step in front of it. 
DM: That makes the carriage stop. (turns to me) Roll again to see if you can free yourself. 
Me: (rolls a 2) So, I’m still stuck. 
DM: Yes. 

Next is the clerics turn, who gets me out of the wheel. The DM then explains what the carriage’s driver will do. 

DM: So, the driver whispers something to his wife, who goes into the back of the carriage. He then hits the horse so hard it rears and starts galloping away. (to the half-orc) What do you do?
Half-orc: I stay where I am. 
DM: …(sighs) Roll for reflex. 
Half-Orc: (rolls a 2)
DM: …So, you try to jump out of the way, but stumble, fall down and get run over. You probably should get someone to heal you. I can’t believe it, we’ve been playing for an hour and a half, we haven’t even really started the campaign yet, but you already got two people seriously injured. 

Trans Activist: Listen to trans people about their struggles and what is and isn’t hurting them.

Dysphoric Person: Saying you can be trans when you don’t have dysphoria hurts us. It makes our painful condition out to be a choice, personality trait, or glorified gender role. It’s turning my already stigmatized medical condition into a joke. People roll their eyes and don’t take me seriously and ask if I’m “void gender” or “demiagenderflux” or use ‘Bunself pronouns” and then laugh. When I go to trans groups online or IRL half the people don’t have a lick of dysphoria and want to talk about clothes and pronouns and we can never talk about medical transition and coping with dysphoria, and when we do they all have to make sure we know they can be trans despite not having dysphoria or needing to socially or medically transition much. Doctor’s aren’t taking me seriously and are more hesitant to prescribe me meds because they’ve had several people detransition after finding out HRT makes them dysphoric because they were already comfortable with their body parts.

Trans Activist: No it doesn’t lol. Jump off a bridge please.

Enrique’s recommended cartoon list

The Amazing World of Gumball

A love letter to animation through and through! Using CGI, traditional animation, flash, stop motion, puppets, clay animation, among others, a show solely created to exploit and push the possibilities this wonderful medium offers, with top-notch tongue-in-cheek humor alongside more slapstick one, that can make you feel when itself to do so in ways that never feel manipulative, the best from both Europe and America.

Courage the Cowardly Dog

Like Gumball, another love letter to animation, but with the added bonus that it’s also a love letter to classic horror films; very surreal, experimental at times, with a writing that can take you anywhere, from scaring the shit out of you, leave you uneasy, leave you uncomfortable, to just downright bittersweet feelings that never once feel forced or hamfisted, the only Cartoon Network show that has ever been nominated to an Oscar. 

Ed, Edd & Eddy

It’s surreal as fuck and it captures the feel of the old, golden era shows from the 30′s and 40′s, plus it has the best ending of a cartoon I’ve ever seen.

Harvey Beaks

It’s cute, it’s uniquely animated, it’s chock full of great characters, and it will constantly remind you of how great it was being a kid; plus, it has the thirstiest, gayest fucking bunny rabbit you’ll ever see, and you will love every second of his appearances. It’s the purest cartoon you’ll ever get to see!

King of the Hill

Relatable characters, relatable storylines, absurd situations that nevertheless always feel real enough, an MC that couldn’t be more different than us, and yet we one way or the other end up identifying with, one fo the very few adult cartoons that don’t have to rely on violence or sex to convey a mature feeling.

Star vs the Forces of Evil

Basically, america taking the magical girls genre from Japan, and just doing it right. The animation goes to shit around mid-season 1, but it recovers in season 2, the writing, however, just improves. One of the very few shows to pull off romance right, and with a constant knack at game-changing events after each season, a true example of how to do overarching plots that actually respect the audience. 

Rick and Morty

Basically everything Futurama ever wanted to be: A love letter to sci fi, with dark yet compelling storylines that are always fun as fuck, fundamentally broken characters that continually evolve without losing their essences, gracious violence, lack of reliance on tired tropes, and surprisingly emotional moments that never feel out of place nor forced. 

Golan the Insatiable.

Uniquely animated, with a very bizarre, borderline ADHD writing that nonetheless always keeps it entertaining, a pity it’s so short.

Samurai Jack

While the current season is the best animated series I’ve ever seen period, the older seasons are just a great, if much more lighthearted and a bit unfocused (mostly due to the old setup of stand-alone episodes), and while it’s true you can watch the new episodes without watching the older ones, as the season has been designed to be enjoyed like that, you can get a much better view of Jack and his current struggles by knowing what he already went through and how he used to tackle his old challenges, which makes the new ones much more striking.

Edit: Having finished season 5, I must say, the first half is still the best animated series I’ve seen period, the second, however, now belongs in the mentions with an *.

Wander Over Yonder

The closest we got to a return of the old slapstick-era cartoons of the golden age, at first a bit superficial, but as the series progresses you learn to love all of its characters, which all go through their own character arcs, alongside a big overarching plot that spans the entire second season, with an excellent ending worthy of its legacy. 

The Grim Adventures of Billy and Mandy

An everpresent dark humor that never takes itself too seriously, broken unlikable characters you will learn to love, a constant improvement in the animation as the show moves forward, an expanded secondary cast that help bring a breath of fresh air to the formula, and just plain awesome movies and crossovers. 

Clarence

A completely slice of life show that just works! Sure, the MC can get annoying, and the first season relies too heavily on gross-out humor, but from the second season the show finds its footing, with characters that are just filled with personality, settings that vary from mundane to just complete bizarre and yet always feel like part of the same universe, and plots that just serve to remind you how it felt to be a kid. Plus, there’s a teacher character that’s completely broken, and yet she always ends up being the most competent character of them all!

And finally, special mentions with a big asterisk:

The Loud House

At its core, it’s a great, unique show with a diverse cast of characters and an interesting animation that while simplistic, has a ton of charm, and when its properly exploited, is fun as hell, but sadly, more often that not it falls into old, tired tropes, making it a frustrating chore to watch, and so far those episodes outnumber the good ones, so it’s still a mixed bag.

Gravity Falls

Everyone and their mom will tell you this is the greatest cartoon ever made, but once you disregard the “muh deepest lore” and “muh mysteries”, it kinda falls apart, mainly due to an overfocus on the first MC, Dipper, heavily distracting from most of the lore in many episodes, the complete flanderization of the second MC, Mabel, originally a great character with tons of charm that eventually devolves into a selfish bastard that never learns from her mistakes or faces consequences for her actions, and finally, a lackluster second half of the final season that kinda throws away all the build-up lore and mysteries. 

Phineas and Ferb

Great songs, great characters, very creative settings, and a fucking Top Gear’s trio cameo! But man if the formula just gets old, some of the songs are just god-awful, and many neat concepts and characters get terribly underused in favor of the same old tropes. Plus the simplistic designs of the main characters tend to clash a lot with the more polished ones found in later seasons.