6

Diamond Necklace For My Wife: Industrial Chic

  I regularly laser machine industrial cemented diamond blanks into high-pressure fluidic cells. My wife often jokes about the fact that I cut up diamonds at work and people are always intrigued by the idea of a black diamond. 

  The above diamond was improperly ground and was therefore useless except for laser testing and practice. So when I decided to make my wife a piece of jewelry for her birthday/graduation gift, I knew exactly what to make it from. 

  Prompted by a tattoo discussion from months prior, I knew that the necklace must incorporate a dot for her mother and a square root of 25 for her dad. Everyone calls Dorothy “Dottie” and Wayne trained his kids to know the square root of 25 and a few other odd facts as a way to prove his kids were smart when they were little. 

  For the finished piece, I used the laser to cut pearl guitar inlays to fit the lasered recesses that I cut in the diamond. I then epoxied the fragile little parts into the cavities and polished the faces when the part was fully cured. I also had to laser drill a hole into the side for the small modified bolt that would hold the diamond pendant to a modified, Amazon purchased, silver necklace. The little bolt and necklace hole allow the pendant to rotate so both sides can be seen. 

9

Ei Wada

Another great short documentary from tocotocotv focuses on Japanese new media artist who loves old redundent media, creating new musical instruments.

[PS - to get subtitles you will need to click on the ‘Captions’ icon third from the bottom right of the YouTube menu bar:]

In this episode, we follow Ei Wada, a young artist evolving in Tokyo, whose universe revolves between music and contemporary art. The instruments he uses for his compositions vary between open reel recorders and all types of old appliances, such as electric fans or televisions. Wada performs in a band named “Open Reel Ensemble”, and also works on various solo projects such as “Electronicos Fantasticos!”, he is also in charge of music for the shows of world-renown brand Issey Miyake during the Paris Fashion Week.

We will follow him in the Sumida district, located in Eastern Tokyo, where Wada has an atelier for one of his projects. Our first stop will be at Retro Enterprises, an old camera shop, which is also the only place in Asia where one can develop 8mm film, Wada often goes there to find inspiration and learn the staff’s techniques to preserve old media.

We will then head towards the Yoshinari steel factory, a local workshop that specializes in a specific type of part for daily-use objects, before heading over Topping East, where Wada does part of his work. He will share more about his universe, his inspirations and his motivations behind giving a new life to appliances that have become obsolete with time. 

Link

History Maker
DEAN FUJIOKA
History Maker

LYRICS :

Can you hear my heartbeat?
Tired of feeling never enough
I close my eyes and tell myself that my dreams will come true

There’ll be no more darkness
When you believe in yourself you are unstoppable
Where your destiny lies, dancing on the blades,
You set my heart on fire

Don’t stop us now, the moment of truth
We were born to make history
We’ll make it happen, we’ll turn it around
Yes, we were born to make history

Can you hear my heartbeat?
I’ve got a feeling it’s never too late
I close my eyes and see myself how my dreams will come true

There’ll be no more darkness
When you believe in yourself you are unstoppable
Where your destiny lies, dancing on the blades,
You set my heart on fire

Don’t stop us now, the moment of truth
We were born to make history
We’ll make it happen, we’ll turn it around
Yes, we were born to make history