majdanek concentration camp

this is a picture of the ashes of cremated jews.

i took this picture two years ago in majdanek, a concentration camp located just outside the major city of lublin, poland. actually, the camp is so close to lublin that during the war, citizens had to scrape the fat from the crematories off their windows.

today is yom hashoa and i am not surprised i haven’t seen much about it. this is the first year i haven’t observed yom hashoa. since i am at college i can’t observe it with my family or my march of the living group, so i thought i’d at least call attention to it.

i went on the march of the living april 15 - april 30, 2012 and i spent one week in poland touring various camps such as this one, auschwitz-birkenau, and treblinka along with ghettos, significant places, and the remains of polish jewry. we marched from auschwitz to auschwitz-birkenau and heard the stories of countless survivors, many of whom had not been back to europe since they fled after the war. i learned a lot and i cried a lot, but it was an experience that changed my entire viewpoint on life.

jews were and are just as oppressed as any other ethnic minority, no, i won’t get over the holocaust, and your opposition to the israeli government gives you no right to be an anti-semite.

if the holocaust is forgotten, it will happen again. don’t let it.

My late father was in Auschwitz. My late mother was in Majdanek concentration camp. Every single member of my family on both sides was exterminated. Both my parents were in the Warsaw ghetto uprising. And it is precisely and exactly because of the lessons they taught me and my two siblings that I will not be silent when Israel commits its crimes against the Palestinians. And I consider nothing more despicable than to use their suffering, and their martyrdom, to try to justify the torture, the brutalization, the demolition of homes, that Israel gainly commits against the Palestinians. So I refuse any longer to be intimidated or brow-beaten by the tears.

If you had any heart in you, would be crying for the Palestinians.

Norman Finkelstein

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Dr. Norman Finkelstein defending his comparison of Zionism to Naziism

My late father was in Auschwitz. My late mother was in Majdanek concentration camp. Every single member of my family on both sides was exterminated. Both my parents were in the Warsaw ghetto uprising. And it is precisely and exactly because of the lessons they taught me and my two siblings that I will not be silent when Israel commits its crimes against the Palestinians. And I consider nothing more despicable than to use their suffering, and their martyrdom, to try to justify the torture, the brutalization, the demolition of homes, that Israel gainly commits against the Palestinians. So I refuse any longer to be intimidated or brow-beaten by the tears. If you had any heart in you, would be crying for the Palestinians.

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“My late father was in Auschwitz. My late mother was in Majdanek concentration camp. Every single member of my family on both sides was exterminated. Both my parents were in the Warsaw ghetto uprising. And it is precisely and exactly because of the lessons they taught me and my two siblings that I will not be silent when Israel commits its crimes against the Palestinians. And I consider nothing more despicable than to use their suffering, and their martyrdom, to try to justify the torture, the brutalization, the demolition of homes, that Israel gainly commits against the Palestinians. So I refuse any longer to be intimidated or brow-beaten by the tears. If you had any heart in you, would be crying for the Palestinians.”

-Norman Finkelstein

Majdanek Camp Jacket

This is a prisoner’s jacket from the Majdanek Concentration Camp. It is part of the infamous striped outfits that the people kept here were forced to wear. Along with the striped uniform, the prisoners would have to wear ill fitting clogs, as well as a badge on their uniform, which would show the reason for their imprisonment. This split the prisoners into categorie, some examples of this can be seen with Jews, who wore yellow stars, homosexuals who wore pink triangles and political prisoners who had to wear a red triangle.