mainstream comics

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Last week I read the anthology Love Is Love, published by DC Comics and IDW, an homage to the victims and survivors of the Orlando shooting.

I didn’t dare asking to participate when Marc Andreyko made an open call for creators. But after reading it, and seeing the DC characters there (which I didn’t expect), I kept thinking what would I have done, and I was inspired to do this short story. Couldn’t help myself actually.
It falls utterly and unashamedly under the category of fan fiction. My first ever.

And to expand on the meta commentary, given the hostile world we live in, as a queer author and activist I think mainstream comics still could use higher profile queer superheroes, tied to their most visible franchises, that are queer super activists alongside the ones that do add to minority representation but sometimes just “happen to be queer”. Of course, as a Wonderfan I think one tied to the Wonder Woman franchise would be just perfect.

I can’t believe that a video game and a lego movie are the only two mainstream comic book adaptations that have treated barbara gordon with respect and allowed her to be her own character instead of using her as a plot device to contribute to bruce’s man pain or passing her around in a series of increasingly out-of-character romances with literally every single male batfam member. 

a family comedy about lego characters is better with how it handles its female characters than 99.99% of “serious” superhero movies.

5

Latinx x Superhero x Queer

Two films are currently playing in theaters with latinx LGBT representation.

The reboot of the ‘90s children’s TV show Power Rangers is the first big-budget superhero movie to feature an LGBT protagonist.

During Power Rangers’ second act, there’s a scene in which the titular heroes learn that the Yellow Ranger, Trini (portrayed by Mexican American singer Becky G.), is coming to terms with her sexual orientation, with one character assuming she’s having “boyfriend problems,” and soon realizing
that perhaps she’s actually having “girlfriend problems.”

A young Rictor makes his debut in the film “Logan”. Portrayed by Latino actor Jayson Genao, Rictor is a mutant child experiment of Dr. Zander Rice
from Transigen lab escapes Transigen lab along with other children. He helps led the group across the border of Mexico where there is a safe haven for mutant kind.

The Rictor of Logan shares the same seismic powers as his comic book counterpart. His origin is different, but the idea of him being a young mutant used for sinister purposes is still present.

In X-Factor comic #45, in 2009, Rictor kissed Shatterstar. The two character first on-panel kiss became the first male-male kiss between two mainstream male superheroes in mainstream Marvel comic book history.

Fans probably shouldn’t expect the young actor from Logan to reprise his role in the X-Force movie, but it’s one more X-Force character in the film universe’s continuity.

Philly comic shop awarded $50,000 to open more doors

Comic book stores, like their retail cousins record shops, are often drawn to tight quarters. Even the “Android’s Dungeon,” the comic shop out of The Simpson’s fictional landscape, occupies only a thin slice of imagined real estate, squished between a barbershop and a diner. But Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse, the brainchild of Philly resident Ariell Johnson, is spread out, light-filled and roomy –– the sprawling comic displays, coffee bar and plush couches are the first visual cues that the Kensington comic emporium is not like its peers.

This week, the Knight Foundation selected Johnson out of more than 4,500 applicants to receive a grant of $50,000. The eighteen-month old comic shop aims to open the world of comics to an “amalgamation” of audiences –– this grant will help the store reach even more.

Johnson’s proposal, “Up, Up and Away: Building a Programming Space at Amalgam Comics & Coffeehouse” will expand the shop into “Amalgam University,” where hopeful writers and illustrators can take classes on drawing, writing, pitching and publishing.

Johnson has already made waves in the comic world. When she opened the store in December of 2015, Johnson became the first African-American woman to own a comic book store on the East Coast. In addition to the largely white-male-authored mainstream staples, Amalgam stocks many works written by people of color, women and members of the LGBT community, as well as those by independent creators.

Because Amalgam sells self-published works, Johnson gets a lot of amateur submissions –– and many of them don’t meet the standards for retail.

“Often, the ideas are there, but they haven’t studied the craft,” Johnson explained. “It’s a comic book, but it’s also literature. Just like there are good writers of literature, there good writers and illustrators of comic books.”

Johnson wanted to find a way to equip aspiring comic creators, particularly those from disenfranchised communities without the means to go to art school, with the tools to compete with mainstream comic books.

Amalgam has already started on this mission –– they run children’s workshops, and partnered with RUSH, Danny Simmons’ arts philanthropy foundation –– an effort which Johnson said is made possible by their spacious venue.

“We do a lot of these programs in our space,” Johnson said. “But the building is actually much bigger. There are rooms behind the bathroom, which we haven’t renovated. This grant will allow us to open up those rooms to the public and create a permanent programming space. We’ll use it to its full potential.”

When the construction is finished sometime next year, Amalgam will be almost twice its present size, and Johnson hopes its impact on the Kensington and comic communities will follow suit. But the store has already influenced the area.

“I actually found out about the grant from a customer named Annie,” Johnson said. “She and her husband had recently moved here. They came in, introduced themselves and encouraged me to apply. Apparently, Amalgam was one of the reasons they moved to the neighborhood.”

Some of Amalgam’s patrons are like Annie –– devoted fans who factor comics into major life decisions –– but others have never read a comic before in their lives.

“We get a lot of newcomers asking for advice.” Johnson explained. “We listen to what people like, and we direct them into their lane. But once they get comfortable, they usually branch out.”

Amalgam, it seems, is doing the same.

I’m sorry but if you don’t know anything about Black Panther you should probably keep your mouth shut. Despite the name he has nothing to do with the political group and he isn’t just some SJW meme. He has incredible historical significance as the first mainstream black comic character and Stan Lee and Jack Kirby created him using the same process as they created any other character. Do not write him off as some token when he deserves as much respect as any other character. And absolutely miss me with that “we wuz kangs” shit. Unless you seriously think monarchies never existed in Africa.

LOGAN SPOILERS!!!
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WE HAVE RICTOR!!!!!!!!!
Jayson Genao appears as Rictor (child version)

Rictor (Julio Esteban “Ric” Richter) is afictional comic book superhero in the Marvel Universe, who appears in the X-Men family of books published by Marvel Comics. In subsequent years, the character was featured as a member of the original New Mutants team and the original X-Force team. Rictor's mutant powers were to generate seismic energy and tremendously powerful vibrations in any nearby object, inducing earthquake-like phenomena and causing objects to shatter or crumble.
Responding to fan interest in the gay subtext surrounding the character in Jeph Loeb's X-Force run, Rictor’s kiss with teammate Shatterstar in the pages of X-Factor vol.3 in 2009 became the first depiction of a same-sex kiss in a mainstream Marvel Comics publication. Since then, Rictor has been written as an outed gay man who is fully accepting of his sexual identity, and one of the few gay superheroes in the Marvel Universe.

OH AND HE’S MEXICAN

The thing about Marvel Comics…

(—speaking as someone who recently drew two issues for Marvel and yes, one of those issues is tangentially tied into the “Secret Empire” events, sigh sigh, so interpret my biases as you will but I want to make clear that I AM NOT DEFENDING NICK SPENCER IN ANY WAY—)

This is what I hope people keep in mind when they call for boycotts:

For all of the crap that Marvel and DC and mainstream comics pull, in all of my time trying to live as a freelance illustrator (and specifically trying to live as a comics artist), drawing for Marvel is the only job I’ve ever gotten that’s given me what could be considered a living wage.

Kickstarted comics anthology gigs — which come sporadically & usually pay meager crumbs, if they’re successfully funded —  are not viable alternatives to well-paying mainstream gigs.  Patreons (which have no safety net & depend entirely on how well an artist can commodify & sell themselves) are not viable alternatives to steady paying jobs.  Taking on commissions to pay your bills is like being a hamster in a wheel that just keeps spinning, spinning, spinning.  Crowdsourcing funds might be fine to realize a hobby-project, but it doesn’t work as a replacement for a living wage.  There is no financial stability in crowdsourcing.

And please please please keep in mind that the individual comic series & issues do not represent the work of Ike Perlmutter (the CEO of Marvel).  They represent the work of the editors and the writers and the artists involved in making those specific issues.

I can only speak for myself and from my very limited experience, but my editor and my writer were insanely lovely & gentle with me.  Whatever else is there (and yes, there’s a lot of bad, too), Marvel is full of good, kind (and diverse) people.  There’s G. Willow Wilson, Mariko Tamaki, Kevin Wada, Kris Anka, Myisha Haynes, Becky Cloonan, Jordie Bellaire, Natacha Bustos, etc. — to name a few.

So:  Look, this whole situation is an ethical tangle (because that’s what corporate America does), and everybody has to make their own call as to what they think is right.  But please don’t forget that Marvel is not a symbol and no single person is its figurehead.  Marvel is a comics company that pays artists and writers to create art.  It might be the shittiest art out there, but it’s still art.  If you hate it, don’t buy it (and tell the company why you’re not buying it).  If you like it, though, then your money is your vote for what direction you’d like comics to move in (and who — writer, artist — you want to support).

Anyway, that’s all I have to say.  Make your choices, whatever they may be, and do your best in the world. ♡

~ Aud

anonymous asked:

Dear Mr Badge, could you please help me to comprehend the situation re Captain Hy...America comics. How its Marvel tied with Disney? Coz I am mainstream watcher (comic books are not my thing and I am mostly here for MCU CA fandom) and now there are Guardians of Galaxy 2, I want to watch them, but dont want to give my money to someone who shits on other people legacies and history. Go to the cinema? Or boycott it?

Disney owns Marvel, and most of the Marvel film properties, although not all of them, because a guy named Chip sold a bunch of them off in the 90s. They’ve slowly been working on reacquiring them. This is why Spider-man belonged to Sony for a while, and why there are two film versions of Pietro. 

Marvel is basically split into several areas – I don’t know the exact legal structure, but Marvel Studios produces the Marvel films, and that is theoretically separate from Marvel Comics, which these days mostly produces white supremacists. 

Often Marvel Comics will do tie ins or adjust their storylines to bring them closer into the Marvel Cinematic Universe alignment (like introducing Phil Coulson as a comics character; he originated in the films), but not always. So when you give money to GOTG2, you are not giving money to anyone affiliated with Marvel Comics – except for the people who own both companies and are allowing the mess over at Comics to continue. 

Both are owned by Disney. And if Disney were to see a significant drop in its movie revenue because some asshole at Marvel Comics is courting Nazis, then yes, probably they would shit a brick. I don’t think that’s realistically going to happen, so for your own sanity it may be both more fun and more productive to enjoy the movie and then afterward send a letter to Disney about Captain Nazi and his Nazi Nazis. 

But I don’t know what the best strategy is for you – only you can decide that, based on your understanding of the structure of this company and your goals. I think it’s laudable that you’re thinking about it, whatever conclusion you come to. 

anonymous asked:

hi for quickfire reviews do you know of any lgbt superhero books :) thanks you

Hi gorgeous, thanks for the ask! Well *cracks knuckles* I personally am always, always on the lookout for more LGBT fiction and superhero’s are awesome so let’s go.

Books:

  • Hero by Perry Moore - A YA book about a young superhero trying to hide his powers from his dad, also has another secret: he’s gay. This one is own voices.

  • Wonder Woman (DC Icons) by Leigh Bardugo - This new Wonder Woman novel comes out in a couple of months. Bardugo is one of my favourite authors and Diana is canonically bisexual so there’s that to look forward to as well!

Graphic Novels:

  • The Pride comic series by Joe Glass & co - A series of comics about a superhero team called The Pride who are all LGBT+!

  • The Authority vol. 1 - A DC comics collection revolving around Apollo, a gay man and superhero 

Marvel and DC Superheroes to check out: 

Just in case those books aren’t enough for you, you can look up these well known faces and find plenty of comics with some LGBT goodness

  • Deadpool is pansexual

  • Wonder Woman is bisexual 

  • Batwoman is a lesbian of Jewish descent (in the modern incarnation anyway, DC wanted to diversify) 

  • Northstar is gay (one of the mutants in X-Men, he was one of the first gay superheroes, and his marriage to his husband was the first depiction of same-sex marriage in mainstream comics).

Want to join in with quickfire reviews? Send me an ask with what kind of books you want to see and I’ll give you some recommendations.

anonymous asked:

hey! you seem to read a lot of comics that are really interesting, do you mind giving a list of recs?

I used to read comics more but then I got lazy and tired of filtering through all the bad ones. I’m super picky though. The only comics I’ve read that aren’t like mainstream comics, or are currently reading, are:

1.) ***Todd Allison and the Petunia Violet (discontinued but still amazing)

2.) ***Killing Stalking (warning: gore, violence, sexual abuse, abuse in general) NSFW

3.) OH! Holly

4.) I Love Yoo

5.) Litchi Hikari Club (warning: gore) NSFW

6.) ***Hanna is Not a Boy’s Name (discontinued)

7.) Out of Control (I didn’t care for the ending but chapter 1-50 or so were good) (boys love) NSFWish

8.) ***At the End of the Road (boys love. Also veeeery interesting)

9.) ***Long Exposure (boys love)

10.) Moritat (boys love)

Any comic with a *** means I really like it. I don’t read a lot of straight comics anymore - but I’m not opposed to them - mainly cuz people write women awful in them and I just got fed up with it. So a lot of these are gay, but I marked which ones. Feel free to look into any of these if you want.

smooti  asked:

A question for Afua - were there any unique challenges to you when you first got into the 'mainstream' comic industry (Marvel and DC)? Would love to hear what your experiences were, and if they got better over time, or to see how it compares to working on indie projects

To be honest, working for the majors is MUCH easier than working for smaller companies. Smaller companies like to micromanage. Bigger companies trust you to do your thing. The biggest challenge is the demand for excellence and that is self-imposed. Whatever it is I make, Millions of people may potentially see it. I can’t have a bad drawing day or artist block for too long. The larger companies, if they’ve come to you, it’s because they see your work in the Indy world and they trust you with their characters. Each editor and writer team works differently, so you experience working is hinged upon who you are working with directly. The only issue I face is when I have several editors on a large project. The editor may have suggestions and changes but when it goes up the pipe, the other folks making decisions may have their own suggestions. I don’t get paid until the work is approved. So if there are too many changes, it can be a bit of a blow to the pockets. But I am learning every day. I’m really grateful I have the opportunity to draw some of my FAVORITE characters I’ve nerded out on since kindergarten. We see these companies as giants but they are just made up of people. Many of those people have become my friends and they really do look out for me.

I had this thought about Superman last night. 

So, there are these stories where Clark Kent and Lois Lane get married. And, in this stories, he’ll reveal his alter ego to Lois but continue keeping it a secret from everyone else. So, in these stories, the world goes on thinking that Clark and Superman are two separate people.

In fact, I think that’s the status quo in the mainstream comics right now. Married Superman and Lois are back, right? Right, okay.

In these stories, Lois and Clark will typically have at least one child, if not a whole bunch. Again, I think that’s happening in the mainstream comics right now, they have a boy named Chris or Jon or something. I don’t think he’s been retconned yet. Yet. Don’t get attached, is my advice.

Anyway, here’s the thing; Superman looks like Superman. When he is being plain old Clark Kent, he disguises himself as a mild-mannered reporter. He wears glasses and wears his hair differently, he slumps, slouches, acts like he has no confidence, wears clothes that hide his physique, and so on. He does a bunch of things to change the shape of his body and face. In some stories, he even passively hypnotizes people into perceiving Clark Kent as looking drastically different from superman – having a weak chin, a receding hairline, etc.

The thing is, though, that his baby isn’t going to be wearing glasses. Maybe later he will but, during baby years, the baby isn’t going to be wearing slouchy clothes and glasses and wearing whatever hair he has in a Clark Kent style. The baby isn’t hypnotizing anyone. The baby, in short, will not look like Clark Kent. In fact, if the baby resembles anyone, it’s Lois Lane’s ex-boyfriend.

“Oh, what a darling baby. And look, he has your chin, Lois, and your eyes. Oh, and a … spitcurl.”

So, basically, no one with anything even remotely like a discerning eye is going to believe that Clark Kent is the father of the baby which remarkably resembles his mother and the Man of Steel. Clark Kent has effectively cuckolded himself. With himself. 

  • <p> <b>Mainstream Superhero comics:</b> if you all are really good, perfectly conforming minorities, maybe I'll give you two black superheros and some queerbaiting, but you gotta sacrifice everything one of your favs stands for<p/><b>Sharp Zero comics:</b> QUEER. AGENDER. GENDERFLUID. TRANS CHARACTERS WHO ARE COMPLEX. NONBINARY TRANS CHARACTERS. CHARACTERS OF EVERY RACE SCATTERED ALL OVER REALISTICALLY. MENTAL AND PHYSICALLY DISABLED SUPER HEROES. AUTISTIC SUPER HERO.<p/><b>Sharp Zero comics:</b> WHAT EVEN IS STRAIGHT????!?!??????<p/></p>