maine ion

The issue with Fallout 4

Fallout 1

You: “I already know where the water chip is, can I just go to Necropolis and get it?

Interplay: “Yeah, sure.”

Fallout 2

You: “I already know where to find the GECK, can I just go to Vault 13 and get it?”

Interplay: “Yeah, sure.”

Fallout 3

You: “I already know where my dad is, can I just go to the vault and get him?”

Bethesda: “Yeah, sure.”

New Vegas

You: “I already know where Benny is, can I just go to Vegas and shoot/negotiate/sleep with him?”

Obsidian: “Yeah, sure.”

Fallout 4

You: “I already know where Kellogg is, can I just go to the fort and kill him?”

Bethesda: “nO FUCK YOU, YOU MUST FOLLOW EVERY STEP OF THE MAIN QUEST WITHOUT QUEST-ION (GET IT?), INCLUDING FOLLOWING DOGMEAT (WHO YOU ARE REQUIRED TO MEET, ALONG WITH NICK VALENTINE AND PIPER) FOR 10 MINUTES THROUGH NOTHING, ONLY STOPPING TO TELL HIM TO SNIFF BLOODY CLOTH EVERY ONCE IN A WHILE. SKIPPING QUEST CONTENT IS UNACCEPTABLE”

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ig // dolphin0k {1k}

HAPPY CANADA DAY!!!!!🇨🇦🇨🇦🇨🇦🇨🇦 I tried to draw something for this photo but it looked terrible so I just printed this one off😂 but fireworks tonight🎆🎆

More and more spots

NASA’s Dawn spacecraft was officially captured by the gravity of the Asteroid Ceres about 2 months ago, but since then we haven’t actually gotten that much data. The Dawn spacecraft’s main engine is an ion-powered thruster that, although it is extremely efficient it isn’t very fast, so the spacecraft has spent the last couple months aiming that thruster in the direction it istraveling to slow down and come into a more circular orbit around Ceres.

As a consequence, the imaging systems on Dawn haven’t been able to aim towards Ceres. However, today, the Dawn team released this photo of the feature everyone keeps wondering about on Ceres, the extremely bright spots.

As the spacecraft moves into closer orbits, it is getting better and better shots of them. As you can see, at least one, if not both of the “spots” that were seen as single bright points in previous, lower-resolution images now are made up of several smaller spots close to each other.

Really neat, but still leaves us with the same questions about what they are. All we know is they’re reflecting a lot of light towards the camera, but that doesn’t yet tell us composition (other instruments can measure that, but we haven’t gotten data from them yet). The best guesses remain that these are exposed areas of water ice or salts, both of which tend to be pretty bright when they’re not covered by other debris.

The Dawn spacecraft will reach its first science altitude, the Survey orbit, in June, and from there will move into two gradually closer orbits afterwards, so we’ll continue seeing better and better pictures of these areas and others for months to come.

-JBB

Image credit: NASA/Dawn