Using genealogy to find your trans-cestors

My grandpa does genealogy for fun and he just emailed me about my great grandmother’s great-great-granduncle who was born Sally Strout in Maine, 1791-1871. He identified as male rather than female and went to the lawmakers of Maine to ask them to recognize him as male, allow him a name change and to be allowed to marry a woman. This caused a lot of hoopla since that just wasn’t done at the time, but in the end Albion Peter Strout got his name change and gender recognition, and legally married a lady, Mary Dorsett, on August 31st 1835. He was well thought of by his peers and owned a tavern and sawmill in Buxton, Maine.

We have ALWAYS existed and the historical records are there to prove it. Genealogy is a great resource for learning about our trans ancestors (and LGBTQ+ too!) and it should be used to its fullest potential. Now I know I have a confirmed trans guy related to me who lived 200 years ago and not only had the respect of his town but even got the law on his side in a time when people like him weren’t taken seriously!! Dig around and see what you find about your own family history. Even if you hate your family that’s living, you may find some amazing and inspirational relatives who have passed on.

GOP leaders want some national monument designations revoked

PORTLAND, Maine — Republican leaders in Maine and Utah are asking President Trump to step into uncharted territory and rescind national monument designations made by his predecessor.

The Antiquities Act of 1906 doesn’t give the president power to undo a designation, and no president has ever taken such a step. But Trump isn’t like other presidents.

Then-president Barack Obama used his power under the act to permanently preserve more land and water using national monument designations than any other president. The land is generally off-limits to timber harvesting, mining and pipelines, and commercial development.

Obama created the Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument in Maine last summer on 87,500 acres of donated forestland. The expanse includes part of the Penobscot River and stunning views of Mount Katahdin, Maine’s tallest mountain. In Utah, Obama created Bears Ears National Monument on 1.3 million acres of land that’s sacred to Native Americans and is home to tens of thousands of archaeological sites, including ancient cliff dwellings. Read more.

Ice clings to the granite shoreline as the sun rises above Acadia National Park in Maine. As dawn turns to day, visitors can explore the park’s forests, wetlands, beaches, lakes and mountains. There’s so much to see and do, but be sure to leave enough energy to find the perfect place to watch the sunset. Photo by National Park Service.

The stillness of a winter sunrise is a moment to cherish at Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Maine. Established in 1966, the refuge protects salt marshes and estuaries important for migrating birds. Stretching from the coast to inland forests, the refuge offers amazing views and wildlife watching on five excellent trails. Photo by Ward Feurt, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.