maiden goddess

Triple Goddesses
  • Maiden: (Aries, Taurus, Gemini, Cancer) Expressive, Enchanting, Adventurous, Curious, Confident, Expansive, Youthful, Enthusiastic, A person who attracts others with innocence and energy, They'll make you better.
  • Mother: (Leo, Virgo, Libra, Scorpio) Fertile, Sexual, Fruitful, Powerful, Guiding, Responsible, Harmonious, Peaceful, Intellectual, A person who attracts others with stability and compassion, They'll make you complete.
  • Crone: (Sagittarius, Capricorn, Aquarius, Pisces) Free, Spiritual, Visionary, Enlightening, Philosophical, Fulfilled, Transforming, A person who attracts others with wisdom and inceptions, They'll change your life.

okay so I was looking into greek mythology, as i tend to do, and came across Astraea (meaning star-maiden), the goddess of justice and innocence. when the earth became riddled with wickedness and humans treated each other unfairly she decided she’d had enough and left to literally become a constellation. she is what we now call Virgo. 

“:.  Novgorod region - 1860s  This is The Sun Shallop.   It is pulled by a pair of swans (their heads are shown as ends of a shallop).   The Sun Maiden drives a vehicle.   A checkered pattern covering the whole image means that characters depicted are gods; and they have a strong connection with The Sun and The Water - productive powers of the world.  The Shallop sprouts with tree branches.”           

“So now, as the Maiden form of the Goddess whispers to us of hope and new beginnings at the festival of Imbolc, it is on a cold February morning that you are invited to step onto the ‘Wheel of the Year.”
Carole Carlton (Mrs Darley’s Pagan Whispers: A Celebration of Pagan Festivals, Sacred Days, Spirituality and Traditions of the Year)

Happy Imbolc or Candlemas!

(via pinterest)

Arturo Michelena (1863-1898)
“Diana cazadora” (1896)

In Roman mythology, Diana was the goddess of the hunt, the moon, and nature, is associated with wild animals and the woodland, and with having the power to talk to and control animals. She was eventually equated with the Greek goddess Artemis, though she had an independent origin in Italy. Diana was also known to be the virgin goddess of childbirth and women. She was one of the three maiden goddesses, along with Minerva and Vesta, who swore never to marry.

For @jsamnfanart​‘s exchange! My match was @asparklethatisblue​ who asked for “Emma/Arabella + stars or flowers” :) I hope you like it. I took the stars idea and ran with it! // (ink and photoshop)

Arabella and Emma are symbolised in Andromeda and Virgo. In Greco-Roman myth, Andromeda (“the chained lady”) is kept against her will by a monster and saved by her hero. Virgo’s constellation is based upon Astraea (“star-maiden”), Ancient Greece’s goddess of innocence and purity. 

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G O D S . A N D . G O D D E S S E S
celtic pantheon; mórrígan the goddess of war

“She appears as a singular being and the Triple Goddess - maiden, mother and crone. Her role was to not only be a symbol of imminent death, but to also influence the outcome of war. Most often she did this by appearing as a crow flying overhead and would either inspire fear or courage in the hearts of the warriors.”

m o r e . a e s t h e t i c s

Basic Wicca: An Introduction to Aspects

One topic that often confuses Wicca newbies is what aspects of the deities actually are, and what the term means. 

An Aspect is, in simple terms, a specific part of a deity that reflects certain elements of that deity within itself. Traditionally, Wicca has two deities (the Triple Goddess and the Horned God), who have three and two aspects respectively. 

The Triple Goddess

The Goddess (also known as the Lady), is often known as the triple goddess as a reflection of her aspects, and what they represent. The Goddess is a deity of moon and night, and her aspects are representative of that nature because the represent the phases of the moon. 

As the moon waxes from new to gibbous, the Goddess is in her Maiden aspect. This is also the aspect of late winter and spring. The Maiden represents childhood, innocence, young love, rebirth (especially after death), new fertility, the prospect of growth, and hope for the future. The things of springtime are the things of the Maiden, such as early-blooming flowers like daffodils, snowdrops and crocuses; eggs and milk; new leaves and buds; yearling meat from lambs and calves. 

From gibbous to gibbous, across the full moon, the Goddess is in her Mother aspect. This is also the aspect of summer and early autumn. The Mother represents maternal love, adulthood and growth, childbirth and childcaring, investments realised, care for others, and life flourishing. The things of summertime are the things of the Mother, such as harvested crops; fresh fruit and vegetables, flowers in bloom, fish and meat, leafy green branches, and other things of growth and summer.

As the moon wanes from gibbous to new, the Goddess is in her Crone Aspect until the cycle repeats. This is also the aspect of late autumn and winter. The Crone represents aging and the closing of one’s life, but also represents the past and contemplation, wisdom and knowledge, loss and death, and the chance of rebirth once more come the spring. The things of autumn are the things of the Crone, such as berries and nuts, late-ripening vegetables such as squash and pumpkins, fat and preserved foods, bulbs of flowers, garlic and the like.

Of course, the solar year cycle isn’t exact, and is dependent on what the life is doing at that time too. The Goddess is a deity of life and growth, and so if the summer hangs on late then so will the Mother, for example.


The Horned God

The God is traditionally depicted with two aspects that revolve around the solar cycle. They fight for dominance every 6 months, and create their respective seasons as they rule over the land. These are the Holly and Oaks Kings, who represent winter and summer respectively.

At the autumnal equinox, the Oak king has been banished underground to rejuvenate for his fight next year. The Holly king takes his throne, and rules over a land of cold and dying back for 3 whole months unchallenged. At Yule, the winter solstice, the Oak king’s power begins to wax as the Holly king’s power begins to wane, and by the vernal equinox the Oak king has risen from the ground, fought the Holly king, and banished him to lick his wounds for another 3 months underground. The Oak king rules for 3 months unchallenged, over a land of heat and growth, and at Litha his own power starts to fade. The two fight once more at Mabon, and the cycle starts over again.

The symbols of the Oak king are, of course, oaken branches laden with green leaves, often woven into a crown, but also all the trappings of summertime. The Oak king is sometimes equated with the Green Man of the Forest, with Lugh, and with Herne the Hunter (often thought to be a pagan deity who was “Christianised” into a ghost of Windsor Forest). 

The symbols of the Holly king are branches of fresh holly, often bearing red berries on green leaves, sometimes woven into a crown of their own. He is also represented by evergreen bows, commonly woven into a Yuletide wreath such as the ones we now associate with Christmas. He is sometimes equated to winter figures such as Jack Frost, Morozko, Old Man Winter, and the old Norse god Odin. He is also associated due to similar times with Father Christmas (Santa Claus).

I think that the specific role of bride is a perfect description of Anthy’s position throughout RGU. If you think of the three standard phases of a woman’s life, you have Maiden, Mother and Crone (you know, I’m not actually sure where I first got that concept from, but apparently in modern paganism those are the three aspects of the Triple Goddess). The maiden is beloved and safely under the control of her father; the mother is respected and safely under the control of her husband; but the crone is suspect because she has outlived husband and father both, and the amount of control her sons have over her will always be questionable. Anthy embodies the crone in her character as the witch - the barely-controlled woman with frightening stores of knowledge and experience. But the crone is too obviously threatening to male-dominated society, so she is limited by social censure. How far do you think Anthy would have been able to get manipulating people if she had been the Rose Witch instead of the Rose Bride? 

In contrast, the bride is a much less threatening character, especially since she is to some extent a sexual object (and therefore ‘useful’ in male-dominated society in a way that the crone is not). The bride appears to have accepted the restraints of society as she allows herself to be passed to the next phase of life, from maiden to mother. But the passage between these two phases is a liminal space, and if the one bit of sociology I know has taught me anything it’s that liminal spaces are dangerous, whether to the person themselves or to society. If the bride is being passed from control of father to control of husband, which one is in control of her at any given moment? If father and groom are at odds, she gets to choose which one to listen to, and that is a surprising locus of freedom and agency for her - we see this very thing when Anthy makes choices between Akio (standing in for the father in this case) and Utena (as the groom). Anthy’s status as an eternal bride (she never actually gets married no matter how long she is engaged) allows her the (albeit limited) freedom to exercise the powers of the crone without the suspicion that is inherently attached to the crone herself.

Imbolc/Imblog Activities and Ideas
  • Make or decorate candles
  • Brighid, the Celtic goddess of fire, healing, and poetry is considered the patron Goddess of Imbolc. Read up on her as a Celtic goddess and as her later incarnation, St. Brigit.
  • Burn the evergreen boughs that decorated your home during the winter holidays in the Imbolc Fires and celebrate the return of the Sun’s strength and the Godess as the Maiden.
  • Brighid is the goddess of poetry. Write a poem in her honor, and read it aloud during any Imbolc ritual you may have planned.
  • Cleanse and re-consecrate your ritual tools and clean your altar.
  • Go through all your herbs and discard those that are more than a year old.
  • Weave “Brigit’s crosses” from straw or wheat to hang around the house for protection
  • Perform rites of spiritual cleansing and purification
  • Make “Brigit’s beds” to ensure fertility of mind and spirit (and body, if desired)
  • Ritually cleanse your home and start your “spring” cleaning
  • Make a Crown of Light (i.e. of candles for the High Priestess to wear for the Imbolc Circle, similar to those worn on St. Lucy’s Day in Scandinavian countries
  • Place a lighted candle in each and every window of the house, beginning at sundown on Candlemas Eve (February 1), allowing them to continue burning until sunrise. Make sure that such candles are well seated against tipping and gaurded from nearby curtains, etc. If you are not able to use real candles use those candle lamps sold at crafts and department stores for the Christian Christmas season.
  • Buy a “salt lick” block and leave it out for the wild animals.
  • Make a window garden with seeds, soil, old glass jars or rinse some tuna or cat food cans, and get ready for spring! Easy items are beans, mints, marigolds. Even carrot or pineapple tops and avocado pits are fun to do.
  • Make a Bride doll
  • Make a tiny “Candle Garden” by filling a small aluminum pan with fine salt or sand and “planting” birthday candles, Hanukkah candles or even tea lights in the “garden”
  • Tie tiny strips of fabric in trees near a stream and ask Bride for her influence in your life. Use cotton strips and the birds will use them for nesting or they will bio-degrade over time
  • Play a candle game where the men stand in forming a circle whole passing a candle quickly and the women stand on the outside of the circle trying to blow out the flame. The one who succeeds gets to claim a kiss.
  • Meditate as a family. Have everyone explore what it would feel like to be a seed deep in the Earth, feeling the first stirrings of life. Lie on the floor and put out tendrils. Stretch and bloom.
  • Have a bardic circle where everyone brings poetry, songs or a short story that they have written to honor Brigid (Brigit/Brigid/Bride was the daughter of Dagda. She was the protector of the poets, the forge and the healing persons.)
  • Help your kids go through all their clothes, toys, and books to find the unwanted and outgrown items. Donate everything to a charity that will give the items to children who need them.
  • Go for a walk. Search for signs of spring. Take off your shoes and socks and squish your toes in the mud!
  • Lead the family on a parade around the outside of your home, banging on pots and pans or playing musical instruments to awaken the spirits of the land.
  • Have your children hold some herb seeds in their hands. Talk to the seeds. Bless them with growth and happiness. Fill them with love.
  • Plant an in-door herb garden.
  • Make corn dollies and a cradle for them to sleep in.

Norse Goddesses: Freyja, she of beauty untamed and battles true

a maiden stained in blood, with words ringing out for all,
fighting for all that’s good and right for those who can’t always fight.
with sword and pen, with flowers and gowns, no battlefield is left whole,
fierce beauty and proud women mark the ages with her by their side.