magnetic effect

Birthday Celebration #8.

Prompt: You turn up at my house at 4am, to cuddle?

Word Count: 873.

Pairing: Bucky Barnes x Reader.

Warnings: Nope.

A/N: Birthday drabble for @letsrunwithdream, hope you like it Ivona! Tried my best for the fluff, but this is the best I can achieve. By the way, thank you @evanstanss for the amazing editing!

Originally posted by marshthemallows

Spring summers had a magnetic effect on her, on her aura. She loved to wear an oversized and cozy knit sweater with fluffy socks while sitting in her loft balcony. The big and comfy loveseat Steve helped her choose worked as a friendly monster. A monster and loyal companion that anchored her to a surface while her mind wandered around fictional stories in a paper that rested between her hands and a glass of cold wine to her right.

The words in front of her eyes, the subtle music of Kings of Leon playing on the ground eased her mind from the horrors sealed in her veins. She would cheer moments like that one forever, moments in which she could just stop being a field doctor and be nothing, a mere observer for those fictional characters.

Keep reading

To create the life of your dreams, the time has come for you to love you. Focus on your joy. Do all the things that make you feel good. Love you, inside and out. Everything will change in your life, when you change the inside of you. Allow the Universe to give you every good thing you deserve, by being a magnet to them all. To be a magnet for every single thing you deserve, you must be a magnet of love.
—  Rhonda Byrne
Renegade (pt. 2)

Originally posted by yeolhighness

Another wolf-finds-his-mate story, but I kicked it up a notch and created a whole new world around it.

Pairing: Chanyeol x Reader

Genre: Supernatural (EXO as wolves, but more species involved in the storyline)

Word count: 6062 words

Warning: curse-words and sex references

New to the series? Start your adventure here: Prologue 
The posts will always contain a link to the next part, unless that part hasn’t been posted yet.


Part 2

Ridiculous. That’s what it was. Absolutely ridiculous. It had been their ancestors, who had come up with the idea of the witch tomb having to be cleaned every Sunday. They believed the weather to be more pleasant whenever the tomb was clean. Back then, they had the worst weather of entire Seoul, except for that one week a year after they’d clean the witch tomb. Nowadays, they always had the foremost preferable weather forecast. Because he had never known otherwise, Chanyeol found it absurd. Wouldn’t their spirits have better things to do?

The witch tomb could be accessed via a small door that was hidden in the pedestal of a giant statue, honouring the witches that had lived there before them and had died mysteriously several centuries ago. It was told they had been murdered and as to catch all their spirits together so they didn’t roam around town, the witch tomb was build. The tomb had a magnetic effect on the spirits of the witches, which was why they first had calculated the exact range the tomb could capture. That also explained its unfortunate location in the middle of the town’s marketplace. The statue in itself, constructed out of cement, plaster and resin, portrayed the image of two naked women and one naked man, standing in a circle and facing the outside of the circle. They were all holding up their arms in the air. One of the women was holding a bouquet of flowers high in the sky, portraying a witch’s connection with nature. Another woman was seemingly pregnant, showing the connection they had with life. A male had a wolf stroking his head to his leg. It displayed what witches stood for, being the servants of nature and the protectors of living beings.

Keep reading

That old cliché

An image: Harry pressed as far back into the cold stone of Hogwarts’ wall as he can get, Malfoy stepping ominously closer until he’s right in front of him, invading his personal space, face intense, eyes even more so.

He’s so close, Harry thinks he can feel the heat of the other boy (no, not a boy anymore) in the scant distance between them, blanketing his exposed skin and making his cheeks and forehead feel like they’re inches away from live fire, not another human being.

He would be glancing wildly around if Draco’s eyes didn’t have a magnetizing effect. No matter how hard he tries, he can’t look away. Malfoy looks so severe, and the flickering torchlight only emphasizes his angularity.

Malfoy takes another step impossibly closer. His hips barely brush Harry’s, and he leans in, presses their foreheads together. All the while, he never breaks eye contact. Harry’s eyes begin to burn, but he can’t bring himself to blink.

They’ve been building up to this all year, Harry thinks. For longer, probably, than he wants to think about. He’s been waiting–anticipating, dreading–this very moment for a long time, and now it’s come, he doesn’t know what to do. His palms feel sweaty, he’s alarmingly aware of his heart beating a tattoo against his ribcage. He swallows nervously.

Malfoy catches the motion, and the shadow of emotion morphs his face for a brief second before it’s gone. Fast enough to leave Harry reeling.

“Scared, Potter?” he asks, and his voice is pitched so low, Harry barely catches it. His body jerks minutely under Draco’s smothering presence, and he–finally, finally–has the permission to blink. Involuntarily, his gaze drops to Malfoy’s lips.

“Yes,” he gasps.

 ( ✧ * • ☾ @theirtattooedhearts. ❜

      saying he’s tired after the double shift he’s just worked would be an understatement. he’s so tired, in fact, that he nearly misses the familiar figure waiting near the entrance as he rubs his eyes whilst exiting the hospital. ( he doesn’t, of course, but that might just be because her presence has an almost magnetic effect on him ) “oh, yes,” he nearly moans as his fingers latch onto the freshly brewed cup of coffee extended towards him – just what he’s needed, “do i even tell you enough that i love you?”

Electromagnetic fields are something a helluvalotta fan stuff has, but I’ve seen, like, .1 of an evidence for it in any canon. NATURALLY, I’m gonna attempt to throw my own twist on it.

Metals moving, electricity running through metals, plasma and sparks, these all have a magnetic effect. Similar to how humans are always making slight movements, gas exchanges, releasing heat and smells, mechanisms are always doing little things that will give them a magnetic field, however slight. It’s not anything they can control at all, any more than humans can control all our little actions. A bot can stop their vents and slow their motions, but they can’t stop the very spark energy from running through them; all bots will always have a detectable field, however slight. It takes SERIOUS training to be able to physically slow your spark pulse. It’s definitely possible to read a mech’s mood through their field, but given that it’s usually quite slight, this also takes an incredible amount of training, finely tuned sensors, and even special mods.

I’ll make special mention of Soundwave here. He’s regarded as something of a telepath, but he isn’t, not really: he’s just incredibly well-tuned to magnetic and electric signals around him. Many whose alts are communications suites or similar types of equipment are like this, but Soundwave is even more sensitive than most. In human terms, it’s less telepathy, and more like reading the minute changes folks have in body temperature, skin tone, pupil dilation, heart rate, etc. to read their mood.

Tutorial for cutting out a person/shape/object from an image.

This was requested by an anonymous follower! There are numerous ways to cut a figure/object/etc out of an image. I’m going to show you some of the ways I use most. (I hope this makes sense, it was harder than expected to explain!)

Keep reading

I feel like in every show there’s that one character we can’t imagine being played by another actor, and for me it’s Anatole in Great Comet. Lucas Steele just has this incredible, easy and relaxed charisma and charm that demands attention; he manages scenes like his introduction with grace and determination and from the moment he steps onstage, you adore him. And then there’s this dramatic unraveling of his character, but no matter how many bad things he does, he’s so charming- no matter what he does, it’s a spectacle. His energy is amazing. I know someday another actor will step into his shoes and perform the role splendidly, but right now it’s hard to see anyone else with the same magnetic effect.

True Facts About Kobolds

Kobolds are somewhat falsely associated with dragons. While some kobolds do indeed gravitate towards dragons and possess dragonic qualities, the entire species has no claim to dragonic power.

The truth is that kobolds are an inherently amorphous and adaptable species, but there is one common thread that unites all kobolds: they tend to gravitate towards whoever they see as the greatest predator in the area and provide their services to that particular creature. Most villains can see the potential benefits of having a tribe of creatures that have a special knack for excavation and architecture at their beck and call: you’d be surprised how many gothic castles inhabited by vampire lords and baroque wizard’s towers have been constructed by kobolds.

Kobolds are effectively magic magnets: whenever they attach themselves to the service of a powerful creature they take on some of the ambient magic of that creature and begin to more closely resemble their masters. The reason for the common association of kobolds with dragons is simply due to dragons being the most high-profile predators, meaning that most kobolds will gravitate towards them.

Thus far I’ve only talked about villains in relation to kobolds, but kobolds don’t necessarily attach themselves to villainous creatures: sometimes the biggest, most powerful creature in the area is a benevolent creature and just as with powerful villains kobolds in service to the powers of good will take upon the features of their masters. Some tribes of kobolds have been known to serve the benevolent Couatls, their appearance remaining reptilian but accentuated by rainbow-hued feathers.

Let’s just agree not to discuss kobolds who attach themselves to otyughs, okay?

hustling-roses  asked:

how do you defend astrology to those who say there's no rhyme or reason behind it, that it's all nonsense?

World famous witch and astrologer Sybil Leek once noted, “All human beings have magic in them.  The secret is to know how to use this magic, and astrology is a vital tool for doing just that.” Access to astrology in the past was restricted largely by demonizing it, while the informed elite continued to use its services in secret; today advocates of “hard science” routinely debunk astrology, applying “objectively reasoned” test conditions in a context that does not adequately apply to the dynamic functionality of the art.   Astrology is the one discipline that can unite the cognate, sensate, emotional and intuitive realms with the phenomena of physical manifestation, not only as pertains to earthly affairs but as connected with the larger cosmos.  However unless one is strongly motivated to get past reading daily sun sign predictions, the personal empowerment available through utilizing astrological technique often goes untapped.(Marguerite Hafeman)

List of scientific based studies in relation to the effectiveness and proof astrology      

Scientific Studies in Relation to Astrology
Adderley, E.E. and Bowen, E.G. “Lunar component in precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 749—751.
Andrews, E.J. “Moon Talk.” Journal of the Florida State Medical Association, 1961, 46 1362—1366.

Barry, H. “Month of Birth as related to psychiatric conditions. A.M.A. Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 1956, 37—38.

Barry, H. and Barry, J. “Season of Birth. An epidemiological study in psychiatry.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1961, 5, 100—108.

Bailar, J.C. and Gurian, J. “Congenital malformations and season of birth.” Eugenics Quarterly, 1965, 12, 146—153.

Bigg, E.K. “Influence of the planet mercury on sunspots.” Astronomical Journal, 1967, 72, 463—468.

Bradley, D. Woodbury, M. and Brier, G. “Lunar synodical period and widespread precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 748—749.

Brown, F.A. “Propensity for lunar periodicity in hamsters and its significance for biological clock theories.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1965, 120, 792—797.

Brown, F.A., Webb, M.M. and Bennett, M.K. “Proof for an endogenous component in persistent solar and lunar rhythmicity in organisms.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1955, 41, 93—100.

Burr, H.S. “Electromagnetic studies in women with malignancy of cervix.” Science, 1947, 105, 209.

Burr, H.S. The Fields of Life (N.Y., 1973).

Burrows, W. “Periodic spawning of pablo worms in Pacific waters.” Nature, 1945, 155, 47—48.

Charles, E. “The Hour of Birth.” British Journal of Preventative Social Medicine, 1953, 7, 43—59.

Clayton, H.H. “Auroras and Sunspots.” Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity, 1940, 45, 13—17.

Cowgill, Y.M. “Season of birth in man.” Ecology, 1966, 47, 614—618.

Cowgill, Y.M., Bishop, A., Andrew, R.J., Hutchinson, G.E. “An apparent lunar periodicity in the sexual cycle of certain prosimians.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1962, 48. 232—241.

Dahlen, Per. “Month of birth and schizophrenia.” Acta psychiatnica Scandinavia, 1968, 203, 55—60.

Davis, A.R. and Rawls, W.C. Magnetism and its Effects On The Living System (N.Y., 1974).

Dewey, E.R. Cycles (N.Y., 1971).

Dewey, E.R. “A possible key to sunspot-planetary relationships.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1975, 6, 175—184.

Edwards, J. “Season and rate of conception.” Nature, 1938, 148, 357.

Fox, H.M. “Lunar periodicity of reproduction.” Nature, 1932, 130, 23.

Friedman, 1-1., Becker, R. and Bachrnan, C. “Geomagnetic parameters and psychiatric hospital admissions.” Nature, 1963, 200, 626—627.

Gauquelin, M. The Cosmic Clocks (Chicago, 1967).

Gauquelin, M. The Scientific Study of Astrology (N.Y., 1969).

Gribbin, J. “Planetary alignments, solar activity and climatic change.” Nature, 1973, 246, 403—405.

Gribbin, J.R. and Plagemann, S.H. The Jupiter Effect (N.Y., 1974).

Hare, E.H. and Price, J.S. “Mental disorder and season of birth: Comparison of psychoses with neuroses.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1963, 115, 533—540.

Hare, E.H., Price, J.S. and Slater, E. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 120, 124—125.

Hare, E.H., Price, J.S., and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth.” Nature,

1973, 241, 480.

Hare, E., Price, J. and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth. A national sample compared with the general population.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 124, 81—86.

Hawkes, J. Man and the Sun (N.Y., 1962).

Hughes, D.W. “The inconstant sun.” Nature, 1977, 226, 405—406.

Huntington, E. Civilization and Climate (New Haven, 1924).

Huntington, E. Season of Birth. Its Relation to Human Abilities (N.Y., 1938).

James, W,H. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1971, 119, 229—230.

James, W.H. “Social class and season of birth.” Journal of Biosocial Science, 1971, 3, 309—320.

J ohannson, B.W. “Myocardial infarction in Malmo.” Acta Medica Scandinavica, 1972, 191, 505—515.

King, J.W. “Solar radiation changes and the weather.” Nature, 1973, 137, 433—444.

King, J.W. “Weather and the Earth’s Magnetic Field.” Nature, 1974, 247, 131—134.

Knobloch, H. and Pasamanick, B. “Seasonal variation in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1958, 48, 1201—1206.

Koebler, K. and Jacoby, C. “Season of birth and Schneider-Oriented diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Archives für Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankeiten, 1976, 223, 69—75.

Kolisko, L. The Moon and The Growth of Plants. Anthroposophical Agricultural Foundation (Brag-on-Thames, 1936).

Krupinski, J., Stoller, A. and King, D. “Season of birth in schizophrenia: An Australian study.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 10, 311—314.

Lester, D., Brockopp, G.W. and Priebe, K. “Association between a full moon and completed suicide.” Psychological Reports, 1969, 25, 598.

Lieber, H.L. and Sherin, C.R. “Homicides and the lunar cycle.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 129, 69—74.

Lilienfeld, D.M. “Lunar effect on mental illness.” American Journal of Psychiatry,1969, 125, 1454.

Malek, J., Greich, J. and Maly, V. “Characteristics of the daily rhythm of menstruation and labor.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1962, 98, 1042—1046.

McCartney, J.L. “Seasonal variation in psychiatric illness.” Psychosornatics, 1962, 3, 312—316.

Menaker, W. and Menaker, A. “Lunar periodicity in human reproduction.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1959, 78, 905—909.

Mills, C.A. Medical Climatology (Springfield, III., 1939).

Milstein, V., Small, J.G., Shelbourne, D. and Small, J.F. “Manic depressive illness: Onset diurnal temperature and season of birth.” Diseases of Nervous System, 1976, 37, 373—375.

Norris, A.S. and Chowning, J.R. “Season of birth and mental illness.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1962, 7, 206—212.

Odegard, 0. “Season of birth in the general population and in patients with mental disorder in Norway.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 125, 397—405.

Osborn, R.D. “The moon and the mental hospital.” Journal of Psychiatric Nursing,

1962, 6, 88—93.

Osseukopp, K.P. and Ossenkopp, M.D. “Self-inflicted injuries and the lunar cycle.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1973, 4, 337—348.

Ott, J. Health and Light (N.Y., 1976).

Parker, C. and Neilson, M. “Mental disorder and season of birth—a Southern hemisphere study.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 129, 355 361.

Pasamanick, B. and Knobloch, H. “Seasonal variation in the births of the mentally deficient—a reply.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 1737—1742.

Piccardi, G. The Chemical Basis of Medical Climatology (Springfield, Iii., 1962).

Pile, W.J. “A study of the correlation between dementia praecox and month of birth.” Virginia Medical Monthly 1951, 78, 438—440.

Ravitz, J. J. “Electrodynamic field theory in psychiatry.” Southern Medical Journal, 1953, 46, 650—660.

Ravitz, L.J. “Comparative clinical and electrocyclic observations in twin brothers.” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 1955, 121, 72—87.

Rippmann, E.G. “The moon and the birth rate.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1957, 74, 148—150.

Rosenberg, R.L. and Colman, F.J. “27-day cycle in the rainfall at Los Angeles.” Science, 1974, 250, 48 1—483.

Rush, A.K. Moon, Moon (Berkeley, Cal., 1976).186

Sarton, C. “Lunar influences on living things.” Isis, 1939, 30, 498—507.

Schnurman, A.G. “The effect of the moon on childbirth.” Virginia Medical Monthly,1949, 76, 78.

Schuster, A. “The influence of planets on the formation of sunspots.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1910, 85, 309.

Shimura, M., Nakamura, I. and Miura, T. “Season of birth of schizophrenics in Tokyo, Japan,” Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1977, 55, 225—232.

Soyka, F. and Edmonds, A. The Ion Effect (N.Y., 1977).

Sterling, T.D. “Seasonal variations in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 955—965.

Stetson, H.T. Sunspots in Action (N.Y., 1947).

Tchijevsky, A.L. “Physical factors of the historical process.” Cycles, 1971, 22, 11—21.

Tempkin, 0. The Failing Sickness (Baltimore, 1971).

Tromp, SW. and Weihe, H. (eds.) Biometeorology (N.Y., 1967).

Videbech, T., Weeke, A. and Dupont, A. “Endogenous psychoses and season of birth.”

Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1974, 50,202—2 18.

Volland, FT. “Can sunspots influence our weather?” Nature, 1977, 269, 409—410.

Watson, L. Supernature (London, 1974).

Winkless, N. and Browning, I. Climate And The Affairs of Men (N.Y., 1975).

Wood, K.D. “Sunspots and planets.” Nature, 1972, 240, 91—92.

Woodrugg, R.A., Guze, S.B. and Clayton, P.J. “Psychiatric illness and season of birth.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 131, 925—926.        

What causes the structure in Comet Lovejoy’s tail? As the name implies, the ion tail is made of ionized gas – gas energized by ultraviolet light from the Sun and pushed outward by the solar wind. The solar wind is quite structured and sculpted by the Sun’s complex and ever changing magnetic field. The effect of the variable solar wind combined with different gas jets venting from the comet’s nucleus accounts for the tail’s complex structure. Following the wind, structure in Comet Lovejoy’s tail can be seen to move outward from the Sun even alter its wavy appearance over time. The blue color of the ion tail is dominated by recombining carbon monoxide molecules, while the green color of the coma surrounding the head of the comet is created mostly by a slight amount of recombining diatomic carbon molecules. The featured three-panel mosaic image was taken from the IRIDA Observatory in Bulgaria.

Object Names: Comet C/2014, Comet Lovejoy

Image Type: Astronomical

Credit: Vladimir Popov, Emil Ivanov (IRIDA Observatory)

Time And Space

adorkable-alren  asked:

can you do jolks angst with the "oh f*ck. oh F*CK" but if you can't do jolks or you're not comfortable with it then NozoEli will be fine!! thank you :) you're writings are rly good !!

!!! Thank you :D i’m sorry i cant do jolks… but have some nozoeli instead

“oh f*ck. oh F*CK” (Nozoeli)

It wasn’t the first time Nozomi came back to the dorms slightly intoxicated, Nico was a wild party friend after all, but the drinking got worse, as with Eli’s own dates.  She wondered if Nozomi ever knew that there were no meaning to her dates, because her heart was with Nozomi all along.

Keep reading

femalecodedobject  asked:

A friend of mine who is pansexual and I (an asexual) were discussing our general lack of visibility. However, I got to thinking, and started wondering why we could see each other? Can two invisible people see each other? Or does the proximity to another invisible person cancel out invisibility? I was wondering if you guys had an opinion on this.

In most cases, two invisible people can see each other.  Never fear, you will still be able to participate in standard invisible activities (espionage, assassination, sneaking into the restricted section of the library) while in proximity to your friend.

In this particular case, you and your friend may in fact be hypervisible to each other, from the magnetic effect of your opposite orientations.  You may notice that your friend appears to have more colors than other beings with whom you are acquainted.  (The same effect may occur between agender and pangender individuals.)

The Ascension of the Soul into Interior Regions of Light & Sound, Part One: Introduction to the Meditation Practice, And,The First Inner Region: Astral Plane: Sahas-Dal-Kanwal: Thousand Petalled Lotus


Unlike other yogic disciplines in India, such as kundalini, surat shabd yoga does not advocate breath control (pranayama) or a series of physical postures (asanas/mudras) as part of its practice. Rather, it is concerned with withdrawing consciousness from the nine apertures of the body (eyes, ears, nose, mouth, genitals, and alimentary canal) and transcending the corporeal frame and its limitations altogether. This is accomplished by attaching the mind’s attention to an inner light and sound which is believed to be radiating behind the proverbial “tenth door” (the “third eye” of the Hindus), anatomically located behind and slightly above the physical eyes (Shiv Dayal Singh, 1970). When consciousness becomes totally concentrated at this pivotal point “between the worlds,” the soul, according to the saints in this tradition, leaves the body and experiences in elevating degrees higher regions of bliss.


The distinctive characteristic of surat shabd yoga is its emphasis on listening to the inner sound current, known variously as shabd, nada, or audible life stream. It is through this union of the soul with the primordial music of the universe that the practice derives its name (surat – soul, shabd – sound current; yoga – union). To be able to achieve a consciously induced near-death state takes great effort. Hence, masters of this path emphasize a three-fold method designed to still the mind and vacate the body: simran, dhyan, and bhajan (Charan Singh, 1979).


Simran, the repetition of a holy name or names, draws one’s attention to the eye center, keeping thoughts from being scattered too far outside. Such sacred remembrance is similar in form to the use of a mantra or special prayer, except that the name(s) are repeated silently with the mind and not with the tongue. This stage, according to practitioners, is the first and perhaps most difficult leg of meditation.


Dhyan, contemplation within, is a technical procedure to hold one’s attention at the third eye focus. In the beginning this may be simply gazing into the darkness or re-imaging the guru’s face, etc., but it eventually develops into seeing light of various shapes. Out of this light appears the “radiant form” of one’s spiritual master, who guides the neophyte on the inner voyage and becomes the central point of dhyan.


Bhajan, listening to the celestial melody or sound, is the last and most important part of surat shabd yoga, because it is the vehicle by which the meditator can travel to exalted planes of awareness. Whereas simran draws and dhyan holds the mind’s attention, it is bhajan which takes awareness on its upward ascent back to the Supreme Abode, Sach Khand. Naturally, mastery of surat shabd yoga is not an overnight affair, but involves years of consistent application and struggle. The desired results, adepts in the tradition agree, being largely due to the earnestness and day to day practice of the seeker.


THE INNER ASCENT


In due time, if the process is complete, the individual spirit current or substance is slowly withdrawn from the body. First from the lower extremities which become feelingless, and then from the rest of the body. The process is identical with that which takes place at the time of death, only this is voluntary, while that of death is involuntary. Eventually, he is able to pierce the veil that intervenes – which in reality is “not thicker than the wing of a butterfly” – and then he opens what is called the “Tenth Door” and steps out into a new world. The body remains in the position in which he left it, quite senseless, but unharmed by the process. He is now in a world he never saw before… – (Julian P. Johnson, 1952)


Before the inner voyage of light and sound can begin, the meditator must become adept at withdrawing his/her attention from the world and concentrating one pointedly at the third eye center. Accordingly, when the neophyte has achieved even a modicum of success, having sensations of numbness just up to the solar plexus, flashes of light will begin to manifest. At first it appears that the light is coming and going, causing the phenomenon of bright sparks, but in actuality it is the mind which is ascending and descending (Charan Singh, 1958, 1967, 1973, 1979).


The feeling of physical insensibility is one of the important “acid tests” to determine if the mediation process is proceeding correctly. Starting in the feet, numbness rises slowly through the lower extremities, until the entire body feels like stone. When such a voluntary paralysis occurs, the meditator gravitates more to the inner universe than to the outer one. According to the masters (Julian P. Johnson, 1974), it is the function of simran to instigate this type of benumbing impression, which releases the mind from its constructing hold on the material corpus.


It is at this junction when the meditator senses an intense feeling of upward movement, as if being literally pulled by a magnetic force. This sucking effect is the direct result of one’s attention moving inward away from the outer orifices. Though it but a preliminary stage, the student experiences first-hand what it is like to have an out-of-body sensation. With practice, the meditator finally does achieve total out-of-body consciousness, traveling at immense speeds through regions of darkness, not dissimilar in content to reports of clinically dead patients who have been resuscitated (Raymond Moody, 1975, Kenneth Ring, 1980, Darshan Singh, 1982).


After complete withdrawal from the physical body, the neophyte’s capacity for inner sight (nirat) and sound (surat) increases tremendously, enabling him/her to see and hear clearly what was only thought before to be a figment of religious imagination. Accompanying this ability is also the realization of a super-conscious state of awareness, remarkably more vivid and lucid than the ordinary waking state (Sawan Singh, 1974).


To understand how such a new degree of consciousness can be awakened, it is important to see how awareness moves through various degrees of clarity. In the waking state, for instance, attention is centered behind the eyes at the back of the head. But, after eighteen or so hours, we notice a movement downward and inward from this station towards the throat (Jagat Singh, 1972) culminating in sleep. Likewise, after about eight hours, we sense a rising upwards to the eyes, with the final termination being, of course, our normal, everyday consciousness. In both of these cases, our common language expresses in a graphically simple way the process of awareness: “We fall asleep; we wake up,” “My eyes are heavy;” “I feel so awake and high.” In yoga psychology the farther down one’s consciousness descends the deeper the sleep (or unconscious) state; the further up it ascends the higher the awareness (super-conscious). The pattern is quite clear; clarity increases steadily the more one ascends (not vice versa). Ken Wilber (1979, 1981) has beautifully described this spectrum of consciousness as having a definite hierarchical structure, with the higher orders subsuming and transcending their lower counterparts.


The following account, primarily based upon Shiv Dayal Singh’s Hidayatnama is filled with rich mythological characterizations, metaphors, and illustrations. For anyone steeped in science, the account will sound too fantastic to be true. However, we should keep in mind that although Shiv Dayal Singh’s description may be limited to the analogies of the 19th century, his fundamental insights are consistent with mystics from time immemorial. When reading Shiv Dayal Singh’s descriptions of the inner regions we should always keep in mind that trans-rational experiences cannot be adequately contained by the inherent boundaries of human language. Let us not confuse a map for the real territory or a menu for the meal.


The First Inner Region: Sahas-dal-kanwal: Thousand petalled Lotus


THE FIRST REGION:


Sahas-dal-kanwal


“Thousand Petalled Lotus”


“When your eye turns inwards in the brain and you see the firmament within, and your spirit leaves the body and rises upwards, you will see the Akash in which is located Sahas-dal-kanwal, the thousand petals of which perform the various functions pertaining to the three worlds. Its effulgence will exhilarate your spirit. You will at that stage, witness Niranjan, the lord of three worlds. Several religions which attained this stage and took the deity thereof to be the Lord of All, were duped. Seeing the light and refulgence of this region they felt satiated. Their upward progress was stopped. They did not find the guide to higher regions. Hence they could not proceed further”. (Swami Ji/Shiv Dayal Singh, Hidayatnama)


[Astral plane; cluster of lights]


Although the wondrous journey out of the body in surat shabd yoga meditation begins in darkness, eventually the meditator glimpses keen points of light, much like stars filling up a black midnight sky. The student is advised to focus his/her attention on the largest and brightest of these “stars” (Kirpal Singh), which with repeated concentration will burst revealing a radiance similar to that of a sun (Sawan Singh). When this light explodes, a brilliance comparable to a full moon will pull one’s attention even further within. Out of that light, according to the masters (Julian P. Johnson), known as Asht-dal-kanwal (“Eight petal lotus”), the resplendent form of one’s guru will appear. This marks the half-way point in the disciple’s ascent, since from here on one is guided to the upper regions by the radiant form of the master (Sawan Singh). Hence it is by comparison an easier progression for the soul than the withdrawal of the mind current from the body.


Along with the seeing of light, consisting of different colors and hues due partly to a particular person’s karma (Faqir Chand, 1978), the meditator also hears a variety of different sounds. At first, as the concentration becomes finer it will assume a more distinct tone, not dissimilar to the tinkling of bells. Indeed, it is the bell sound which is to be held onto, as its melody will help lead the soul into the first region, known technically in Radhasoami as Sahas-dal-kanwal, but also termed in other traditions as the astral plane, turiya pad, etc.


Entrance into the pure astral plane, though heralded as a magnificent achievement, is, according to Sant Mat, but the beginning of the inner voyage. It is alleged by many saints in the tradition (Kabir, Tulsi Sahib, Sawan Singh, etc.) that several great religious leaders mistakenly believed that the light and sound of this region were of the Absolute Lord. Instead of realizing that the manifestations were partial glimpses of a higher reality, they worshipped them as the totality of God. This kind of error is perhaps the chief reason why the Sant Mat and Radhasoami movements stress so much the necessity of a living guide. Above all else, the masters emphasize, test thoroughly whatever appears inside meditation. [The main test advised by the mystics is to repeat slowly the holy name or names which were given at the time of initiation; also verify the authenticity of one’s experiences with the outer guru for his/her validation.]


Each major region of consciousness has its own center and guiding lord. In Sahas-dal-kanwal the ruler is known as the lord of light and is the creator of all the universe in its jurisdiction (Julian P. Johnson). However, the extent of each ruler’s power is limited and circumscribed by the next higher deity, who, likewise receives its creative energy from above, etc. This governing hierarchy, like the kundalini chakra system, is based on the concept that all spiritual evolution (and even material transformation) was preceded by an involution. Therefore, the meditator must pass through several regions of light and sound before attaining true enlightenment.


In order to overcome the many barriers and obstacles on the way, the guru instructs the student not to attach him or her self to any particular vision, as they are merely signposts along the way. In fact, all of the intermediary lords, or centers of power, are not to be venerated but transcended. It is for this reason that the Beas branch of the Radhasoamis and Sawan-Kirpal Mission in agreement with previous saints, give out five holy names as their meditation mantra. Each name represents the presiding lord and his relative spiritual energy; to the meditator they serve as passwords, so to say, to insure safe passage into the next level of consciousness.


Obviously, the concern here is that a student may get stuck or retained in one of the lower realms, believing that he/she has reached the ultimate, when, in fact, what they have attained is illusory and impermanent. Surat shabd yoga literature is replete with stories of would-be masters who have been duped on the inner journey (for instance, see the book Anurag Sagar which goes on in detail about sages being misled in their meditations).


(Above is from, Enchanted Land, by David Lane, MSAC Philosophy Group)


Huzur Maharaj (Rai Saligram):


“This discourse is intended for the benefit of those who, seeing the instability and transitory state of the things in this world, as well as its short-lived pleasures and greatness, have a craving for everlasting and unalloyed happiness and undisturbed peace in a realm which is not subject to change, decay or dissolution”.


Huzur Maharaj (Rai Saligram):


“The method of taking back the Spirit entity to its Original Source is to ride the Sound Current”.


“The method for taking back the spirit entity to its Supreme Source is first to concentrate at the eye-focus – the seat of the soul, the spirit entity and mind which are defused in our body and in a manner tied to external objects by desires and passions, and next to commence its journey homewards by attending to the Internal Sound, or in other words, by riding the Life or Sound Current which has originally emanated from the Supreme Source”.


“The Current which has been instrumental in having brought it down here must naturally be the Path for its return to the Original Source, and whoever finds this Current is on the Path of Emancipation. This Current which is the Spirit and Life Current is called in the Radhasoami Faith, "Sound” or “Word” or Holy Name". (Prem Patra Radhasoami, Agra)

anonymous asked:

Are there different kinds of ways to create fusion?

I’m glad you asked! Right now, there are two major experimental approaches for fusion being studied: magnetic confinement and inertial confinement.

In magnetic confinement fusion, the electrical conductivity of deuterium-tritium plasma is used to contain it within magnetic fields at a high pressure and heated to fusion temperature. Because the particles need to be repelled from the walls of a reactor (otherwise contact will dissipate their heat and slow them down), the most effective magnetic configuration is toroidal wherein the magnetic field is curved around and forms a closed loop. There are several different types of toroidal confinement systems but the most important are tokamaks and stellarators (reversed-field pinch devices would be next; however, plasma confinement in the best RFP is only about 1% as good as in the best tokamaks, owing largely to the fact that existing RFPs are very small).

Tokamak

Stellarator

In inertial confinement fusion, which is a newer line of fusion research, laser or ion beams are focused extremely precisely on a target - a pellet of deuterium-tritium fuel only a few millimeters in diameter. When the outer layer of the material is heated, it creates an outward explosion that generates an implosion that in turn compresses and heats the inner layers of material and results in conditions in which fusion can occur. The core of the fuel may be compressed to 1,000 times its liquid density and the energy released heats the surrounding fuel that may also undergo fusion, leading to a chain reaction (this is referred to as ignition) as the reaction spreads outward through the fuel. 

Large scale attempts at inertial confinement fusion include the Shiva laser built by Lawrence Livermore National Lab, followed by the Nova laser, the 24 beam OMEGA laser and the Novette Laser, which all paved the way for the National Ignition Facility in Livermore, California.

List of scientific based studies in relation to the effectiveness and proof astrology

Scientific Studies in Relation to Astrology

Adderley, E.E. and Bowen, E.G. “Lunar component in precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 749—751.

Andrews, E.J. “Moon Talk.” Journal of the Florida State Medical Association, 1961, 46 1362—1366.
Barry, H. “Month of Birth as related to psychiatric conditions. A.M.A. Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 1956, 37—38.
Barry, H. and Barry, J. “Season of Birth. An epidemiological study in psychiatry.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1961, 5, 100—108.
Bailar, J.C. and Gurian, J. “Congenital malformations and season of birth.” Eugenics Quarterly, 1965, 12, 146—153.
Bigg, E.K. “Influence of the planet mercury on sunspots.” Astronomical Journal, 1967, 72, 463—468.
Bradley, D. Woodbury, M. and Brier, G. “Lunar synodical period and widespread precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 748—749.
Brown, F.A. “Propensity for lunar periodicity in hamsters and its significance for biological clock theories.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1965, 120, 792—797.
Brown, F.A., Webb, M.M. and Bennett, M.K. “Proof for an endogenous component in persistent solar and lunar rhythmicity in organisms.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1955, 41, 93—100.
Burr, H.S. “Electromagnetic studies in women with malignancy of cervix.” Science, 1947, 105, 209.
Burr, H.S. The Fields of Life (N.Y., 1973).
Burrows, W. “Periodic spawning of pablo worms in Pacific waters.” Nature, 1945, 155, 47—48.
Charles, E. “The Hour of Birth.” British Journal of Preventative Social Medicine, 1953, 7, 43—59.
Clayton, H.H. “Auroras and Sunspots.” Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity, 1940, 45, 13—17.
Cowgill, Y.M. “Season of birth in man.” Ecology, 1966, 47, 614—618.
Cowgill, Y.M., Bishop, A., Andrew, R.J., Hutchinson, G.E. “An apparent lunar periodicity in the sexual cycle of certain prosimians.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1962, 48. 232—241.
Dahlen, Per. “Month of birth and schizophrenia.” Acta psychiatnica Scandinavia, 1968, 203, 55—60.
Davis, A.R. and Rawls, W.C. Magnetism and its Effects On The Living System (N.Y., 1974).
Dewey, E.R. Cycles (N.Y., 1971).
Dewey, E.R. “A possible key to sunspot-planetary relationships.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1975, 6, 175—184.
Edwards, J. “Season and rate of conception.” Nature, 1938, 148, 357.
Fox, H.M. “Lunar periodicity of reproduction.” Nature, 1932, 130, 23.
Friedman, 1-1., Becker, R. and Bachrnan, C. “Geomagnetic parameters and psychiatric hospital admissions.” Nature, 1963, 200, 626—627.
Gauquelin, M. The Cosmic Clocks (Chicago, 1967).
Gauquelin, M. The Scientific Study of Astrology (N.Y., 1969).
Gribbin, J. “Planetary alignments, solar activity and climatic change.” Nature, 1973, 246, 403—405.
Gribbin, J.R. and Plagemann, S.H. The Jupiter Effect (N.Y., 1974).
Hare, E.H. and Price, J.S. “Mental disorder and season of birth: Comparison of psychoses with neuroses.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1963, 115, 533—540.
Hare, E.H., Price, J.S. and Slater, E. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 120, 124—125.
Hare, E.H., Price, J.S., and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth.” Nature,
1973, 241, 480.
Hare, E., Price, J. and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth. A national sample compared with the general population.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 124, 81—86.
Hawkes, J. Man and the Sun (N.Y., 1962).
Hughes, D.W. “The inconstant sun.” Nature, 1977, 226, 405—406.
Huntington, E. Civilization and Climate (New Haven, 1924).
Huntington, E. Season of Birth. Its Relation to Human Abilities (N.Y., 1938).
James, W,H. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1971, 119, 229—230.
James, W.H. “Social class and season of birth.” Journal of Biosocial Science, 1971, 3, 309—320.
J ohannson, B.W. “Myocardial infarction in Malmo.” Acta Medica Scandinavica, 1972, 191, 505—515.
King, J.W. “Solar radiation changes and the weather.” Nature, 1973, 137, 433—444.
King, J.W. “Weather and the Earth’s Magnetic Field.” Nature, 1974, 247, 131—134.

Knobloch, H. and Pasamanick, B. “Seasonal variation in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1958, 48, 1201—1206.
Koebler, K. and Jacoby, C. “Season of birth and Schneider-Oriented diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Archives für Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankeiten, 1976, 223, 69—75.
Kolisko, L. The Moon and The Growth of Plants. Anthroposophical Agricultural Foundation (Brag-on-Thames, 1936).
Krupinski, J., Stoller, A. and King, D. “Season of birth in schizophrenia: An Australian study.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 10, 311—314.
Lester, D., Brockopp, G.W. and Priebe, K. “Association between a full moon and completed suicide.” Psychological Reports, 1969, 25, 598.
Lieber, H.L. and Sherin, C.R. “Homicides and the lunar cycle.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 129, 69—74.
Lilienfeld, D.M. “Lunar effect on mental illness.” American Journal of Psychiatry,1969, 125, 1454.
Malek, J., Greich, J. and Maly, V. “Characteristics of the daily rhythm of menstruation and labor.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1962, 98, 1042—1046.
McCartney, J.L. “Seasonal variation in psychiatric illness.” Psychosornatics, 1962, 3, 312—316.
Menaker, W. and Menaker, A. “Lunar periodicity in human reproduction.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1959, 78, 905—909.
Mills, C.A. Medical Climatology (Springfield, III., 1939).
Milstein, V., Small, J.G., Shelbourne, D. and Small, J.F. “Manic depressive illness: Onset diurnal temperature and season of birth.” Diseases of Nervous System, 1976, 37, 373—375.
Norris, A.S. and Chowning, J.R. “Season of birth and mental illness.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1962, 7, 206—212.
Odegard, 0. “Season of birth in the general population and in patients with mental disorder in Norway.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 125, 397—405.
Osborn, R.D. “The moon and the mental hospital.” Journal of Psychiatric Nursing,
1962, 6, 88—93.
Osseukopp, K.P. and Ossenkopp, M.D. “Self-inflicted injuries and the lunar cycle.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1973, 4, 337—348.
Ott, J. Health and Light (N.Y., 1976). 
Parker, C. and Neilson, M. “Mental disorder and season of birth—a Southern hemisphere study.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 129, 355 361.
Pasamanick, B. and Knobloch, H. “Seasonal variation in the births of the mentally deficient—a reply.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 1737—1742.
Piccardi, G. The Chemical Basis of Medical Climatology (Springfield, Iii., 1962).
Pile, W.J. “A study of the correlation between dementia praecox and month of birth.” Virginia Medical Monthly 1951, 78, 438—440.
Ravitz, J. J. “Electrodynamic field theory in psychiatry.” Southern Medical Journal, 1953, 46, 650—660.
Ravitz, L.J. “Comparative clinical and electrocyclic observations in twin brothers.” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 1955, 121, 72—87.
Rippmann, E.G. “The moon and the birth rate.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1957, 74, 148—150.
Rosenberg, R.L. and Colman, F.J. “27-day cycle in the rainfall at Los Angeles.” Science, 1974, 250, 48 1—483.
Rush, A.K. Moon, Moon (Berkeley, Cal., 1976).186
Sarton, C. “Lunar influences on living things.” Isis, 1939, 30, 498—507.
Schnurman, A.G. “The effect of the moon on childbirth.” Virginia Medical Monthly,1949, 76, 78.
Schuster, A. “The influence of planets on the formation of sunspots.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1910, 85, 309.

Shimura, M., Nakamura, I. and Miura, T. “Season of birth of schizophrenics in Tokyo, Japan,” Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1977, 55, 225—232.
Soyka, F. and Edmonds, A. The Ion Effect (N.Y., 1977).
Sterling, T.D. “Seasonal variations in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 955—965.
Stetson, H.T. Sunspots in Action (N.Y., 1947). 
Tchijevsky, A.L. “Physical factors of the historical process.” Cycles, 1971, 22, 11—21.
Tempkin, 0. The Failing Sickness (Baltimore, 1971).
Tromp, SW. and Weihe, H. (eds.) Biometeorology (N.Y., 1967).
Videbech, T., Weeke, A. and Dupont, A. “Endogenous psychoses and season of birth.”
Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1974, 50,202—2 18.
Volland, FT. “Can sunspots influence our weather?” Nature, 1977, 269, 409—410.
Watson, L. Supernature (London, 1974).
Winkless, N. and Browning, I. Climate And The Affairs of Men (N.Y., 1975).
Wood, K.D. “Sunspots and planets.” Nature, 1972, 240, 91—92.
Woodrugg, R.A., Guze, S.B. and Clayton, P.J. “Psychiatric illness and season of birth.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 131, 925—926.
Dread Doctors, Time, Mirror verse and are they doing stuff to Scott as well?

I’ve been pondering something about the doctors and time and I think I just found another piece that might fit the theory. This brings with it some mirror verse speculations and a weird suspicion that the doctors are doing something to Scott as well.

Remember

Scott: Here you go, Stephanie. 
Stephanie: Thank you, Dr. McCall. 
Scott: I’m not a doctor yet.

Also this official fanart poster which has Scott with a clock indicating time over his eye, and it looks like the monocle the doctors use, and we have the black blood which we’ve seen on all the chimera experiments. 


This will be long I can feel it. 

Keep reading