magnetic effect

A note on levitating frogs and superconductivity

Last week we took a look at diamagnetic levitation and how you can use a powerful magnetic field to levitate frogs, tomatoes and theoretically humans.

Another cool demonstration of diamagnetic levitation. is with an array of magnets and electrolytic carbon.

                                               PC: UCLA

Electrolytic carbon being diamagnetic ( Remember that a diamagnetic material is one which would rather ‘die’ than be attracted to a magnetic field ) opposes the magnetic field set up by the magnet array and levitates !


Superconductivity

Superconductors when cooled below a critical temperature in principle are just ideal diamagnets in that they completely  expel the magnetic field due to the meissner effect. 

However, always keep in mind  that the fundamental origins of diamagnetism in superconductors and normal materials are extremely different and must not be confused.


A2A (Anonymous): Are superconductors and diamagnets the same ?

Thanks for asking!

hustling-roses  asked:

how do you defend astrology to those who say there's no rhyme or reason behind it, that it's all nonsense?

World famous witch and astrologer Sybil Leek once noted, “All human beings have magic in them.  The secret is to know how to use this magic, and astrology is a vital tool for doing just that.” Access to astrology in the past was restricted largely by demonizing it, while the informed elite continued to use its services in secret; today advocates of “hard science” routinely debunk astrology, applying “objectively reasoned” test conditions in a context that does not adequately apply to the dynamic functionality of the art.   Astrology is the one discipline that can unite the cognate, sensate, emotional and intuitive realms with the phenomena of physical manifestation, not only as pertains to earthly affairs but as connected with the larger cosmos.  However unless one is strongly motivated to get past reading daily sun sign predictions, the personal empowerment available through utilizing astrological technique often goes untapped.(Marguerite Hafeman)

List of scientific based studies in relation to the effectiveness and proof astrology      

Scientific Studies in Relation to Astrology
Adderley, E.E. and Bowen, E.G. “Lunar component in precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 749—751.
Andrews, E.J. “Moon Talk.” Journal of the Florida State Medical Association, 1961, 46 1362—1366.

Barry, H. “Month of Birth as related to psychiatric conditions. A.M.A. Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 1956, 37—38.

Barry, H. and Barry, J. “Season of Birth. An epidemiological study in psychiatry.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1961, 5, 100—108.

Bailar, J.C. and Gurian, J. “Congenital malformations and season of birth.” Eugenics Quarterly, 1965, 12, 146—153.

Bigg, E.K. “Influence of the planet mercury on sunspots.” Astronomical Journal, 1967, 72, 463—468.

Bradley, D. Woodbury, M. and Brier, G. “Lunar synodical period and widespread precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 748—749.

Brown, F.A. “Propensity for lunar periodicity in hamsters and its significance for biological clock theories.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1965, 120, 792—797.

Brown, F.A., Webb, M.M. and Bennett, M.K. “Proof for an endogenous component in persistent solar and lunar rhythmicity in organisms.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1955, 41, 93—100.

Burr, H.S. “Electromagnetic studies in women with malignancy of cervix.” Science, 1947, 105, 209.

Burr, H.S. The Fields of Life (N.Y., 1973).

Burrows, W. “Periodic spawning of pablo worms in Pacific waters.” Nature, 1945, 155, 47—48.

Charles, E. “The Hour of Birth.” British Journal of Preventative Social Medicine, 1953, 7, 43—59.

Clayton, H.H. “Auroras and Sunspots.” Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity, 1940, 45, 13—17.

Cowgill, Y.M. “Season of birth in man.” Ecology, 1966, 47, 614—618.

Cowgill, Y.M., Bishop, A., Andrew, R.J., Hutchinson, G.E. “An apparent lunar periodicity in the sexual cycle of certain prosimians.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1962, 48. 232—241.

Dahlen, Per. “Month of birth and schizophrenia.” Acta psychiatnica Scandinavia, 1968, 203, 55—60.

Davis, A.R. and Rawls, W.C. Magnetism and its Effects On The Living System (N.Y., 1974).

Dewey, E.R. Cycles (N.Y., 1971).

Dewey, E.R. “A possible key to sunspot-planetary relationships.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1975, 6, 175—184.

Edwards, J. “Season and rate of conception.” Nature, 1938, 148, 357.

Fox, H.M. “Lunar periodicity of reproduction.” Nature, 1932, 130, 23.

Friedman, 1-1., Becker, R. and Bachrnan, C. “Geomagnetic parameters and psychiatric hospital admissions.” Nature, 1963, 200, 626—627.

Gauquelin, M. The Cosmic Clocks (Chicago, 1967).

Gauquelin, M. The Scientific Study of Astrology (N.Y., 1969).

Gribbin, J. “Planetary alignments, solar activity and climatic change.” Nature, 1973, 246, 403—405.

Gribbin, J.R. and Plagemann, S.H. The Jupiter Effect (N.Y., 1974).

Hare, E.H. and Price, J.S. “Mental disorder and season of birth: Comparison of psychoses with neuroses.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1963, 115, 533—540.

Hare, E.H., Price, J.S. and Slater, E. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 120, 124—125.

Hare, E.H., Price, J.S., and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth.” Nature,

1973, 241, 480.

Hare, E., Price, J. and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth. A national sample compared with the general population.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 124, 81—86.

Hawkes, J. Man and the Sun (N.Y., 1962).

Hughes, D.W. “The inconstant sun.” Nature, 1977, 226, 405—406.

Huntington, E. Civilization and Climate (New Haven, 1924).

Huntington, E. Season of Birth. Its Relation to Human Abilities (N.Y., 1938).

James, W,H. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1971, 119, 229—230.

James, W.H. “Social class and season of birth.” Journal of Biosocial Science, 1971, 3, 309—320.

J ohannson, B.W. “Myocardial infarction in Malmo.” Acta Medica Scandinavica, 1972, 191, 505—515.

King, J.W. “Solar radiation changes and the weather.” Nature, 1973, 137, 433—444.

King, J.W. “Weather and the Earth’s Magnetic Field.” Nature, 1974, 247, 131—134.

Knobloch, H. and Pasamanick, B. “Seasonal variation in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1958, 48, 1201—1206.

Koebler, K. and Jacoby, C. “Season of birth and Schneider-Oriented diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Archives für Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankeiten, 1976, 223, 69—75.

Kolisko, L. The Moon and The Growth of Plants. Anthroposophical Agricultural Foundation (Brag-on-Thames, 1936).

Krupinski, J., Stoller, A. and King, D. “Season of birth in schizophrenia: An Australian study.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 10, 311—314.

Lester, D., Brockopp, G.W. and Priebe, K. “Association between a full moon and completed suicide.” Psychological Reports, 1969, 25, 598.

Lieber, H.L. and Sherin, C.R. “Homicides and the lunar cycle.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 129, 69—74.

Lilienfeld, D.M. “Lunar effect on mental illness.” American Journal of Psychiatry,1969, 125, 1454.

Malek, J., Greich, J. and Maly, V. “Characteristics of the daily rhythm of menstruation and labor.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1962, 98, 1042—1046.

McCartney, J.L. “Seasonal variation in psychiatric illness.” Psychosornatics, 1962, 3, 312—316.

Menaker, W. and Menaker, A. “Lunar periodicity in human reproduction.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1959, 78, 905—909.

Mills, C.A. Medical Climatology (Springfield, III., 1939).

Milstein, V., Small, J.G., Shelbourne, D. and Small, J.F. “Manic depressive illness: Onset diurnal temperature and season of birth.” Diseases of Nervous System, 1976, 37, 373—375.

Norris, A.S. and Chowning, J.R. “Season of birth and mental illness.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1962, 7, 206—212.

Odegard, 0. “Season of birth in the general population and in patients with mental disorder in Norway.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 125, 397—405.

Osborn, R.D. “The moon and the mental hospital.” Journal of Psychiatric Nursing,

1962, 6, 88—93.

Osseukopp, K.P. and Ossenkopp, M.D. “Self-inflicted injuries and the lunar cycle.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1973, 4, 337—348.

Ott, J. Health and Light (N.Y., 1976).

Parker, C. and Neilson, M. “Mental disorder and season of birth—a Southern hemisphere study.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 129, 355 361.

Pasamanick, B. and Knobloch, H. “Seasonal variation in the births of the mentally deficient—a reply.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 1737—1742.

Piccardi, G. The Chemical Basis of Medical Climatology (Springfield, Iii., 1962).

Pile, W.J. “A study of the correlation between dementia praecox and month of birth.” Virginia Medical Monthly 1951, 78, 438—440.

Ravitz, J. J. “Electrodynamic field theory in psychiatry.” Southern Medical Journal, 1953, 46, 650—660.

Ravitz, L.J. “Comparative clinical and electrocyclic observations in twin brothers.” Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, 1955, 121, 72—87.

Rippmann, E.G. “The moon and the birth rate.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1957, 74, 148—150.

Rosenberg, R.L. and Colman, F.J. “27-day cycle in the rainfall at Los Angeles.” Science, 1974, 250, 48 1—483.

Rush, A.K. Moon, Moon (Berkeley, Cal., 1976).186

Sarton, C. “Lunar influences on living things.” Isis, 1939, 30, 498—507.

Schnurman, A.G. “The effect of the moon on childbirth.” Virginia Medical Monthly,1949, 76, 78.

Schuster, A. “The influence of planets on the formation of sunspots.” Proceedings of the Royal Society of London, 1910, 85, 309.

Shimura, M., Nakamura, I. and Miura, T. “Season of birth of schizophrenics in Tokyo, Japan,” Acta psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1977, 55, 225—232.

Soyka, F. and Edmonds, A. The Ion Effect (N.Y., 1977).

Sterling, T.D. “Seasonal variations in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1960, 50, 955—965.

Stetson, H.T. Sunspots in Action (N.Y., 1947).

Tchijevsky, A.L. “Physical factors of the historical process.” Cycles, 1971, 22, 11—21.

Tempkin, 0. The Failing Sickness (Baltimore, 1971).

Tromp, SW. and Weihe, H. (eds.) Biometeorology (N.Y., 1967).

Videbech, T., Weeke, A. and Dupont, A. “Endogenous psychoses and season of birth.”

Acta Psychiatrica Scandinavica, 1974, 50,202—2 18.

Volland, FT. “Can sunspots influence our weather?” Nature, 1977, 269, 409—410.

Watson, L. Supernature (London, 1974).

Winkless, N. and Browning, I. Climate And The Affairs of Men (N.Y., 1975).

Wood, K.D. “Sunspots and planets.” Nature, 1972, 240, 91—92.

Woodrugg, R.A., Guze, S.B. and Clayton, P.J. “Psychiatric illness and season of birth.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 131, 925—926.        

2

magnets vs tvs

old tubed televisions like these work through electrons, wherein numerous electrons are stored inside a tube and multiple electron magnets manipulate them in order to create an image. these electrons can also be manipulated by powerful outside magnets, creating these effects.

anonymous asked:

I'm learning combinatorics now. Do you know any cool places they are used ? Sorry for bad english

Combinatorics is quite frankly an ocean with a wide variety of applications. But since you ask, let’s take a look at the example of a ‘Two state Paramagnet’.


What is a paramagnet?

A paramagnet is a material in which the particles like compass needles align parallel to any applied magnetic field. But it is a temporary effect and the magnetization is lost when the field is removed


Paramagnetism in Liquid Oxygen

One of the popular examples of paramagnetism is liquid oxygen.

When oxygen is liquefied and poured over a magnet, the magnetic effect of the electrons become substantially noticeable.

Molecules will align to the magnetic from the magnet creating an induced magnetic field of its own. 

As the liquid oxygen boils off you can you can see for a moment a ‘mist’ that it gives off that is still attracted to the magnets. - Paramagnetism


But how many particles are aligned with the field?


So, what can you do with that ?

One can find the net magnetization produced by the material based on the total number of dipoles facing up or down.

And essentially the total energy of the system (neglecting any interactions between dipoles).


We have come a long way from a simple combinatorics formula, now haven’t we? 


Great question! Thanks for asking :)

René Descartes. Principia Philosophiae. 1644.

Birthday Celebration #8.

Prompt: You turn up at my house at 4am, to cuddle?

Word Count: 873.

Pairing: Bucky Barnes x Reader.

Warnings: Nope.

A/N: Birthday drabble for @letsrunwithdream, hope you like it Ivona! Tried my best for the fluff, but this is the best I can achieve. By the way, thank you @evanstanss for the amazing editing!

Originally posted by marshthemallows

Spring summers had a magnetic effect on her, on her aura. She loved to wear an oversized and cozy knit sweater with fluffy socks while sitting in her loft balcony. The big and comfy loveseat Steve helped her choose worked as a friendly monster. A monster and loyal companion that anchored her to a surface while her mind wandered around fictional stories in a paper that rested between her hands and a glass of cold wine to her right.

The words in front of her eyes, the subtle music of Kings of Leon playing on the ground eased her mind from the horrors sealed in her veins. She would cheer moments like that one forever, moments in which she could just stop being a field doctor and be nothing, a mere observer for those fictional characters.

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Remember the Time - Epilogue

Here it is! The final part of this fic. I struggled with nerves publishing this series as it was written during a particularly tough time for me. It was a time of doubt and sadness (as evidenced by some themes in this story). I realize that I am nowhere close to the talent that this fandom has, but I want to thank every single person who took the time to read, like, reblog and comment on this fic. I don’t believe words would be able to express just how much that meant to me. Thank you again, and happy reading everyone :)

The past 2 years in New York had been different. But the time had flown by.

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ECLIPSE SCIENCE ALONG THE PATH OF TOTALITY:
NSF, NASA, NCAR HIGHLIGHT KEY SOLAR ECLIPSE PROJECTS

Leading U.S. solar scientists today highlighted research activities that will take place across the country during next month’s rare solar eclipse, advancing our knowledge of the Sun’s complex and mysterious magnetic field and its effect on Earth’s atmosphere.

Experts at the National Science Foundation (NSF), National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) provided details at this morning’s press conference about the array of technologies and methodologies that will be used to obtain unprecedented views of the Sun on Aug. 21. The experiments, led by specialized researchers, will also draw on observations by amateur skywatchers and students to fill in the picture.

“This total solar eclipse across the United States is a fundamentally unique opportunity in modern times, enabling the entire country to be engaged with modern technology and social media,” said Carrie Black, an associate program director at NSF who oversees solar research. “Images and data from potentially as many as millions of people will be collected and analyzed by scientists for years to come.”

“This is a generational event,” agreed Madhulika Guhathakurta, NASA lead scientist for the 2017 eclipse. “This is going to be the most documented, the most appreciated eclipse ever.”

The scientific experiments will take place along the path of totality, a 70-mile wide ribbon stretching from Oregon to South Carolina where the Moon will completely cover the visible disk of the Sun. Depending on the location, viewers will get to experience the total eclipse for as long as 2 minutes and 40 seconds. It will take about an hour and a half for the eclipse to travel across the sky from the Pacific Coast to the Atlantic.

NASA and other organizations are reminding viewers to take eye safety precautions because it is not safe to look at the Sun during an eclipse except during the brief total phase, when the Moon completely blocks the Sun’s everyday bright face, which will happen only if you are within the path of totality.

For scientists, the celestial event is a rare opportunity to test new instruments and to observe the elusive outer atmosphere of the Sun, or solar corona, which is usually obscured by the bright surface of the Sun. Many scientific questions focus on the corona, including why it is far hotter than the surface and what role it plays in spewing large streams of charged particles, known as coronal mass ejections, that can buffet Earth’s atmosphere and disrupt GPS systems and other sensitive technologies.

Black noted that the Moon will align exactly with the Sun’s surface, which will enable observations of the entire corona, including very low regions that are rarely detectable. Obtaining observations from the ground is particularly important, she explained, because far more data can be transmitted than would be possible from space-based instruments.

“The Moon is about as perfect an occulter as one can get,” she said. “And what makes this an even more valuable opportunity is that everyone has access to it.”

In addition to training ground-based instruments on the Sun, scientists will also deploy aircraft to follow the eclipse, thereby increasing the amount of time they can take observations.

An NCAR research team, for example, will use the NSF/NCAR Gulfstream-V research aircraft to take infrared measurements for about four minutes, helping scientists better understand the solar corona’s magnetism and thermal structure. Scientists with the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder will use visible and infrared telescopes on NASA’s twin WB-57 airplanes in a tag-team approach, enabling them to get a unique look at both the solar corona and Mercury for about eight minutes. The goal is to better understand how energy moves through the corona as well as learning more about the composition and properties of Mercury’s surface.

Scientists will also study Earth’s outer atmosphere during the eclipse. The ionosphere is a remote region of the atmosphere containing particles that are charged by solar radiation. Disturbances in the ionosphere can affect low-frequency radio waves. By blocking energy from the Sun, the eclipse provides scientists with an opportunity to study the ionosphere’s response to a sudden drop in solar radiation.

For example, a Boston University research team will use off-the-shelf cell phone technology to construct a single-frequency GPS array of sensors to study the ionospheric effects of the eclipse. This project could lay the foundation for using consumer smartphones to help monitor the outer atmosphere for disturbances, or space weather events, caused by solar storms. Another experiment, run by researchers at the University of Virginia and George Mason University, will use transmitters broadcasting at low frequencies to probe the response of regions of the ionosphere, while a Virginia Tech team will use a network of radio receives and transmitters across the country to observe the ionosphere’s response during the eclipse.

Citizen scientists also are expected to play a major role in taking valuable observations during the eclipse.

“This is a social phenomenon, and we have a significant opportunity to promote this and do all the science that we can,” Guhathakurta said.

The Citizen Continental-America Telescopic Eclipse (CATE) Experiment by the National Solar Observatory and the University of Arizona, for example, will rely on volunteers from universities, high schools, informal education groups, and national labs for an eclipse “relay race.” Participants spaced along the path of totality will use identical telescopes and digital camera systems to capture high-quality images that will result in a dataset capturing the entire, 93-minute eclipse across the country. And a project led by the University of California, Berkeley, will assemble a large number of solar images, obtained by students and amateur observers along the eclipse path to create educational materials as part of the Eclipse Megamovie project.

“As these projects show, the eclipse will place the Sun firmly in the forefront of the national eye,” said Scott McIntosh, director of NCAR’s High Altitude Observatory. “This is a unique opportunity to communicate the fact that our star is complex, beautiful, and mysterious. At the same time, it is more critical than ever to study it, as solar activity can pose significant threats to our technologically driven society.”

I…I got way to into Jojo and then Emi happened…

So anyways, I’m just going to leave you with this little character sheet of my newest baby and her Stand, and also a little Chapter 0 preview.



It was incredible, Emi thought, how many things could go wrong in the space of one minute. That was sixty seconds. Sixty measly seconds ago she was a normal university student sneaking into a professor’s office after hours. A misdemeanor at the most.

She coughed up a mouthful of blood, but as quietly as possible so her hunter wouldn’t be alerted to her half-assed hiding spot behind a partially demolished wall. Part of her brain told her to get up, ignore the broken ribs, and find better cover. Another part of her said to stay very quiet until Jotaro Kujo and his damned gigantic purple Stand gave up.

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To create the life of your dreams, the time has come for you to love you. Focus on your joy. Do all the things that make you feel good. Love you, inside and out. Everything will change in your life, when you change the inside of you. Allow the Universe to give you every good thing you deserve, by being a magnet to them all. To be a magnet for every single thing you deserve, you must be a magnet of love.
—  Rhonda Byrne
Renegade (pt. 2)

Originally posted by yeolhighness

Another wolf-finds-his-mate story, but I kicked it up a notch and created a whole new world around it.

Pairing: Chanyeol x Reader

Genre: Supernatural (EXO as wolves, but more species involved in the storyline)

Word count: 6062 words

Warning: curse-words and sex references

New to the series? Start your adventure here: Prologue 
The posts will always contain a link to the next part, unless that part hasn’t been posted yet.


Part 2

Ridiculous. That’s what it was. Absolutely ridiculous. It had been their ancestors, who had come up with the idea of the witch tomb having to be cleaned every Sunday. They believed the weather to be more pleasant whenever the tomb was clean. Back then, they had the worst weather of entire Seoul, except for that one week a year after they’d clean the witch tomb. Nowadays, they always had the foremost preferable weather forecast. Because he had never known otherwise, Chanyeol found it absurd. Wouldn’t their spirits have better things to do?

The witch tomb could be accessed via a small door that was hidden in the pedestal of a giant statue, honouring the witches that had lived there before them and had died mysteriously several centuries ago. It was told they had been murdered and as to catch all their spirits together so they didn’t roam around town, the witch tomb was build. The tomb had a magnetic effect on the spirits of the witches, which was why they first had calculated the exact range the tomb could capture. That also explained its unfortunate location in the middle of the town’s marketplace. The statue in itself, constructed out of cement, plaster and resin, portrayed the image of two naked women and one naked man, standing in a circle and facing the outside of the circle. They were all holding up their arms in the air. One of the women was holding a bouquet of flowers high in the sky, portraying a witch’s connection with nature. Another woman was seemingly pregnant, showing the connection they had with life. A male had a wolf stroking his head to his leg. It displayed what witches stood for, being the servants of nature and the protectors of living beings.

Keep reading

List of scientific based studies in relation to the effectiveness and proof astrology

Scientific Studies in Relation to Astrology

Adderley, E.E. and Bowen, E.G. “Lunar component in precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 749—751.

Andrews, E.J. “Moon Talk.” Journal of the Florida State Medical Association, 1961, 46 1362—1366.
Barry, H. “Month of Birth as related to psychiatric conditions. A.M.A. Archives of Neurology and Psychiatry, 1956, 37—38.
Barry, H. and Barry, J. “Season of Birth. An epidemiological study in psychiatry.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1961, 5, 100—108.
Bailar, J.C. and Gurian, J. “Congenital malformations and season of birth.” Eugenics Quarterly, 1965, 12, 146—153.
Bigg, E.K. “Influence of the planet mercury on sunspots.” Astronomical Journal, 1967, 72, 463—468.
Bradley, D. Woodbury, M. and Brier, G. “Lunar synodical period and widespread precipitation.” Science, 1962, 137, 748—749.
Brown, F.A. “Propensity for lunar periodicity in hamsters and its significance for biological clock theories.” Proceedings of the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine, 1965, 120, 792—797.
Brown, F.A., Webb, M.M. and Bennett, M.K. “Proof for an endogenous component in persistent solar and lunar rhythmicity in organisms.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1955, 41, 93—100.
Burr, H.S. “Electromagnetic studies in women with malignancy of cervix.” Science, 1947, 105, 209.
Burr, H.S. The Fields of Life (N.Y., 1973).
Burrows, W. “Periodic spawning of pablo worms in Pacific waters.” Nature, 1945, 155, 47—48.
Charles, E. “The Hour of Birth.” British Journal of Preventative Social Medicine, 1953, 7, 43—59.
Clayton, H.H. “Auroras and Sunspots.” Terrestrial Magnetism and Atmospheric Electricity, 1940, 45, 13—17.
Cowgill, Y.M. “Season of birth in man.” Ecology, 1966, 47, 614—618.
Cowgill, Y.M., Bishop, A., Andrew, R.J., Hutchinson, G.E. “An apparent lunar periodicity in the sexual cycle of certain prosimians.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 1962, 48. 232—241.
Dahlen, Per. “Month of birth and schizophrenia.” Acta psychiatnica Scandinavia, 1968, 203, 55—60.
Davis, A.R. and Rawls, W.C. Magnetism and its Effects On The Living System (N.Y., 1974).
Dewey, E.R. Cycles (N.Y., 1971).
Dewey, E.R. “A possible key to sunspot-planetary relationships.” Journal of Interdisciplinary Cycle Research, 1975, 6, 175—184.
Edwards, J. “Season and rate of conception.” Nature, 1938, 148, 357.
Fox, H.M. “Lunar periodicity of reproduction.” Nature, 1932, 130, 23.
Friedman, 1-1., Becker, R. and Bachrnan, C. “Geomagnetic parameters and psychiatric hospital admissions.” Nature, 1963, 200, 626—627.
Gauquelin, M. The Cosmic Clocks (Chicago, 1967).
Gauquelin, M. The Scientific Study of Astrology (N.Y., 1969).
Gribbin, J. “Planetary alignments, solar activity and climatic change.” Nature, 1973, 246, 403—405.
Gribbin, J.R. and Plagemann, S.H. The Jupiter Effect (N.Y., 1974).
Hare, E.H. and Price, J.S. “Mental disorder and season of birth: Comparison of psychoses with neuroses.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1963, 115, 533—540.
Hare, E.H., Price, J.S. and Slater, E. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 120, 124—125.
Hare, E.H., Price, J.S., and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth.” Nature,
1973, 241, 480.
Hare, E., Price, J. and Slater, E. “Mental disorder and season of birth. A national sample compared with the general population.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1974, 124, 81—86.
Hawkes, J. Man and the Sun (N.Y., 1962).
Hughes, D.W. “The inconstant sun.” Nature, 1977, 226, 405—406.
Huntington, E. Civilization and Climate (New Haven, 1924).
Huntington, E. Season of Birth. Its Relation to Human Abilities (N.Y., 1938).
James, W,H. “Schizophrenia and season of birth.” British Journal of Psychiatry, 1971, 119, 229—230.
James, W.H. “Social class and season of birth.” Journal of Biosocial Science, 1971, 3, 309—320.
J ohannson, B.W. “Myocardial infarction in Malmo.” Acta Medica Scandinavica, 1972, 191, 505—515.
King, J.W. “Solar radiation changes and the weather.” Nature, 1973, 137, 433—444.
King, J.W. “Weather and the Earth’s Magnetic Field.” Nature, 1974, 247, 131—134.

Knobloch, H. and Pasamanick, B. “Seasonal variation in the birth of the mentally deficient.” American Journal of Public Health, 1958, 48, 1201—1206.
Koebler, K. and Jacoby, C. “Season of birth and Schneider-Oriented diagnosis of schizophrenia.” Archives für Psychiatrie und Nervenkrankeiten, 1976, 223, 69—75.
Kolisko, L. The Moon and The Growth of Plants. Anthroposophical Agricultural Foundation (Brag-on-Thames, 1936).
Krupinski, J., Stoller, A. and King, D. “Season of birth in schizophrenia: An Australian study.” Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry, 1976, 10, 311—314.
Lester, D., Brockopp, G.W. and Priebe, K. “Association between a full moon and completed suicide.” Psychological Reports, 1969, 25, 598.
Lieber, H.L. and Sherin, C.R. “Homicides and the lunar cycle.” American Journal of Psychiatry, 1972, 129, 69—74.
Lilienfeld, D.M. “Lunar effect on mental illness.” American Journal of Psychiatry,1969, 125, 1454.
Malek, J., Greich, J. and Maly, V. “Characteristics of the daily rhythm of menstruation and labor.” Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences, 1962, 98, 1042—1046.
McCartney, J.L. “Seasonal variation in psychiatric illness.” Psychosornatics, 1962, 3, 312—316.
Menaker, W. and Menaker, A. “Lunar periodicity in human reproduction.” American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 1959, 78, 905—909.
Mills, C.A. Medical Climatology (Springfield, III., 1939).
Milstein, V., Small, J.G., Shelbourne, D. and Small, J.F. “Manic depressive illness: Onset diurnal temperature and season of birth.” Diseases of Nervous System, 1976, 37, 373—375.
Norris, A.S. and Chowning, J.R. “Season of birth and mental illness.” Archives of General Psychiatry, 1962, 7, 206—212.
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Earth-like atmosphere may not survive Proxima b's orbit

Proxima b, an Earth-size planet right outside our solar system in the habitable zone of its star, may not be able to keep a grip on its atmosphere, leaving the surface exposed to harmful stellar radiation and reducing its potential for habitability.

At only four light-years away, Proxima b is our closest known extra-solar neighbor. However, due to the fact that it hasn’t been seen crossing in front of its host star, the exoplanet eludes the usual method for learning about its atmosphere. Instead, scientists must rely on models to understand whether the exoplanet is habitable.

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That old cliché

An image: Harry pressed as far back into the cold stone of Hogwarts’ wall as he can get, Malfoy stepping ominously closer until he’s right in front of him, invading his personal space, face intense, eyes even more so.

He’s so close, Harry thinks he can feel the heat of the other boy (no, not a boy anymore) in the scant distance between them, blanketing his exposed skin and making his cheeks and forehead feel like they’re inches away from live fire, not another human being.

He would be glancing wildly around if Draco’s eyes didn’t have a magnetizing effect. No matter how hard he tries, he can’t look away. Malfoy looks so severe, and the flickering torchlight only emphasizes his angularity.

Malfoy takes another step impossibly closer. His hips barely brush Harry’s, and he leans in, presses their foreheads together. All the while, he never breaks eye contact. Harry’s eyes begin to burn, but he can’t bring himself to blink.

They’ve been building up to this all year, Harry thinks. For longer, probably, than he wants to think about. He’s been waiting–anticipating, dreading–this very moment for a long time, and now it’s come, he doesn’t know what to do. His palms feel sweaty, he’s alarmingly aware of his heart beating a tattoo against his ribcage. He swallows nervously.

Malfoy catches the motion, and the shadow of emotion morphs his face for a brief second before it’s gone. Fast enough to leave Harry reeling.

“Scared, Potter?” he asks, and his voice is pitched so low, Harry barely catches it. His body jerks minutely under Draco’s smothering presence, and he–finally, finally–has the permission to blink. Involuntarily, his gaze drops to Malfoy’s lips.

“Yes,” he gasps.

Tutorial for cutting out a person/shape/object from an image.

This was requested by an anonymous follower! There are numerous ways to cut a figure/object/etc out of an image. I’m going to show you some of the ways I use most. (I hope this makes sense, it was harder than expected to explain!)

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 ( ✧ * • ☾ @theirtattooedhearts. ❜

      saying he’s tired after the double shift he’s just worked would be an understatement. he’s so tired, in fact, that he nearly misses the familiar figure waiting near the entrance as he rubs his eyes whilst exiting the hospital. ( he doesn’t, of course, but that might just be because her presence has an almost magnetic effect on him ) “oh, yes,” he nearly moans as his fingers latch onto the freshly brewed cup of coffee extended towards him – just what he’s needed, “do i even tell you enough that i love you?”