magical superhero

Native Superheroes and Avoiding Stereotypical Roles

@wordsmithkg asked:

Sorry to bother you guys, this is a bit of a weird one, but if I’m writing something and part of it features a group of Native American (specifically Navajo) superheroes, are there powers I should avoid for cliché/stereotyping reasons, or that would feel disrespectful? For example, I can’t help but feel geokinesis would be too much of a literal manifestation of the “closer to earth” stereotype. I unfortunately don’t know any Navajo, but I did find an online community I plan to ask as well

Animal. Powers. If I see one more Native shapeshifter and/or animal speaker, I feel like I’m going to scream. Trackers, too. Plant manipulators. Spiritual mediums. Archers with superhuman aim.

Basically, look up Magical Native American and if it shows up on that list, avoid unless you manage to justify it in-universe with something other than “Natives have x”. 

Geokenisis sounds fun! The thing I like about it is it sounds modern. A lot of the icky part about Natives with powers is people assuming that the powers are “ancient” and therefore detached from modern society. They rely more than they would like to admit on Noble Savage, so if you break that with either modern sounding powers and/or non-nature based things, you’re good.

The main thing about Native powers I’ve found is they rely on sixth sense/otherworldly connection, instead of having anything that’s a pseudoscientific explanation. So if you had “felt the earth’s natural heat rising and falling”, that would be one thing, but if you had “telepathic abilities focusing on dense objects such as stone or metal”, that’s another. The former is flirting with Magical Native, the latter sounds like a superhero power.

Give it the same BS explanation that non-Native superheroes get. If you’re just going for “oh, they’re more ~*in tune*~” then I would have problems, but if you’re going with something that is at least trying to sound scientific, you’re much safer. Even something just like “genetic mutation allows for x” is cool.
The problems with tropes like Magical Native American or even Magical Nergo is the principle tends to stop at “because they are this ethnicity, they have these powers.” Meanwhile, if the reasoning is built into the character— ie- Black Panther has powers because he is king of Wakanda, and therefore has access to a plant that enhances ability to the point of a supersoldier— then you’re avoiding the heart of the trope which is that some skin colours just inherently have magic.

So, make it pseudoscientific, and try to avoid “spiritual” based stuff. Then, you’re good.

~ Mod Lesya

DC Super Hero Girls show coming to Cartoon Network

Batgirl, Supergirl and Wonder Woman are coming to Cartoon Network in 2018. 

Based on a series of direct-to-video and YouTube videos, DC Super Hero Girls will continue the franchise begun in 2015, which also includes many toys, books and clothing. 

Lauren Faust (My Little Pony: Friendship is Magic) is producing and will create “fresh character designs” for Diana (Wonder Woman), Barbara (Batgirl), Kara (Supergirl) and the rest of the DC crew, according to IGN.com

Originally posted by powerfulsuperherogirls

Bumblebee, Green Lantern Jessica Cruz, Harley Quinn, Katana and Zatanna are also reported to appear in the Cartoon Network show, which will cover the teens lives as superheroes and students in Metropolis. 

Joining Faust on the production crew is Sam Register (Teen Titans Go!) as executive producer. The series will be headed by Warner Bros. Animation. 

- Courtney ( @harmonicacave )

*Ladybug and Chat Noir hit by an akumatized attack that turns everyone into 'magical girls'*
  • Ladybug, frowning at her outfit: ugh. How am I supposed to run and fight in these high heels and this tiny skirt??
  • Chat Noir, cartwheeling past her in his tiny skirt and heels: What, like it's hard?

hc idea that Nino will be the first one to know that his friends (and Chloe) are superheroes.

And with that he will be the one saving them in school and begin telling excuses to save their asses cause hell knows non of them is good at lying. 

“Adrien? He must have been call for a photoshoot. You know my bro. And you know his dad too, Ms. Bustier.”

“Marinette had to help her parents with an order! She must have forgotten to excuse herself, Ms Mendeliev,”

“Alya is trying to record another video for her blog, you know how stubborn she is about her self being, but here, she gave me her homework.”

“Chloé? Eh, who knows, probably hiding somewhere.”

(he starts telling better excuses for Chloé when he notices how she saves his girlfriend more times that he should have expected coming from her, both in and out of costume)

ree-fireparrot  asked:

What makes an outfit practical or impractical to fight in? Would an acrobat's outfit with some decent shoes be okay to fight in? Any suggestions on how to make an outfit frilly/girly without sacrificing (too much) practicality? (Trying to come up with practical[ish] Magical Girl outfits - know it's not your genre probably - there are certain expectations for frilliness even for tomboyish characters)

You’re, basically, looking for three things: How well can you move in it, does it give potential foes anything to grab, and does it offer any protection?

If you can’t move freely in your clothes, you can’t fight in them. It doesn’t matter if we’re talking about them being tight enough to restrict movement, or if they make it difficult to walk around. Tight skirts, high heels, tailored suits; it doesn’t matter; they’ll all limit your ability to fight.

With footwear, you’re looking primarily at how well you can stand and move in it. Shoes and boots designed to grip the floor are (usually) the best options here. So, things like sneakers or work boots are good options. Rubberized soles will help you keep your footing far better when you’re standing in someone’s blood than a dress shoe or high heels.

Things like long coats, ties, free flowing skirts, scarves, hoodies, or of course capes, won’t usually limit your mobility, but they can give an opponent something to grab. Once that happens, that article of clothing will limit your mobility (some). This is also a factor that’s difficult to completely eliminate. Practiced martial artists can, and do, go for collar or lapel grabs on clothing you might think would pass. That said, there are some special cases here.

If the article of clothing will tear away freely, it’s (kind of) a wash. You’re still talking about losing clothes, which isn’t usually something you want, but it means you’re not getting dragged out of position by an attacker.

If the combatant is ready for it, it’s possible to use something like this as a firing point to retaliate. If you know, roughly, where their hand is, it’s much easier to extrapolate where the rest of them is in relation to you. This still doesn’t make fighting in long flowing garments a good idea.

The final factor, almost by definition, doesn’t really apply with magical girls as a genre, and can get a little weird when you’re talking about any superhuman characters.

Ideally, if you’re planning to get into a fight, you’ll want durable clothing that will take a few hits, and hopefully shield you from harm. Materials like leather and denim hold up much better than lighter fabrics. Insulation in a jacket will take some kinetic force from a strike (not a lot, but still), so it’s better than just jeans and a tee, or even a denim jacket. This also gets into a discussion we’ve had before. Protection is often about making tradeoffs.

An insulated leather jacket will (slightly) reduce your mobility. It will give an opponent something they can grab. But, it will also offer protection from stray hits and while parrying incoming strikes. It won’t protect against gunshots, or against a sword, and if that’s what your character was likely to face, they’d need armor to deal with those threats instead.

Somewhat obviously, exposed skin isn’t offered any protection. Technically, skin itself is protection for your body, and it does function as your first line of defense against infection, but that’s mostly academic in this context.

This is also where, magical girls, and most superhero subgenres, deliberately start straying from reality, without actually being unrealistic (in the literary sense). What matters is if your character has some kind of protection from the threats they’re facing. It doesn’t matter if that’s an ancient alien artifact, a mystical gemstone, or the weaponized power of friendship. That is what protects your character, not her denim vest. You’re also talking about characters where the threats they face are, effectively, impossible to mitigate through mundane means. Again, a leather jacket, no matter how snazzy, won’t do much against a death beam from some snarling murderbeast, or blows from a sword with an enchantment that drains the soul from anyone who touches it. As I’ve said before, you select your armor to deal with the threats you’re likely to face, and when it comes to magical girls, those threats are (almost always) going to be far beyond anything you could physically protect against.

Normally, you wouldn’t want to fight off an arisen god of war in a school girl uniform, but it’s not like a flak vest would offer any more protection against a threat like that.

-Starke

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“...hallucination check, Ted.”

Ted the Animator: “No, no… I’m seein’ this, too.”

Carl the Animator: “Ok, good, ‘cause the storyboards seem very clear that KISS starts glowing neon colors.”

Ted the Animator: “…and then start flying, apparently.”

Carl the Animator: “This… this was not a turn I was expecting the movie to take, but one I’m totally on board for.”

Ted the Animator: “I like how they couldn’t think of a visual flying-power-effect-thingy for the green cat guy, so they just didn’t give him one.”

Carl the Animator: “He’s a magical cat person. He prolly just, like, jumps long distances.”

Ted the Animator: “The animation doesn’t show that. Come on, Carl, visual storytelling.’

Carl the Animator: “Well, ok, how would you show that a rock ‘n’ roll band member cat person with green cosmic superpowers had used them to jump incredibly far towards a spinning teacups carnival ride for the purpose of saving a talking dog?”

Ted the Animator: “I’d ha–… ok, that may be the greatest sentence I’ve ever heard.”

Carl the Animator: “You know it.”

Ted the Animator: “…let’s just move on before our brains start melting.”

Carl the Animator: “Speaking of which, this guy turns into a fire-breathing dinosaur person.”

Ted the Animator: “And the other guy becomes some kind of cat thing, as we previously established.”

Carl the Animator: “And don’t forget the coupla frames of closeup on his face when he jumps towards the camera.”

Ted the Animator: “…wow.”

Carl the Animator: “According to fans, this sequence is *identical* to some of the transformation scenes in Sailor Moon.” 

Ted the Animator: “Ah, cool, I didn’t kn–… wait, how exactly have fans seen this? We’re looking at production storyboards!”

Carl the Animator: "…”

Ted the Animator: “Carl….”

Carl the Animator: “Ok, fine, I might have tweeted a few things out.”

Ted the Animator: “You’re lucky no one cares enough to make us sign NDAs, y’know.”

Carl the Animator: “…so, moving along from shaky legal territory, KISS has a big fight with the bad guy, and Shaggy & Scooby almost puke after getting off the spinning teacups ride.”

Ted the Animator:All the best action scenes end with our heroes nearly barfing on top of their friend.”

Carl the Animator: “Then, there’s a fade transition to… uh….”

Carl the Animator: “…um…”

Ted the Animator: “…is that a hospital? Wait, are they DEAD?

Carl the Animator: “I doubt it, but if so, man that got dark in a hurry.”

Ted the Animator: “I guess the spinning teacups were too much for them.”

Carl the Animator: “This is what happens if you eat too many sweets before going on the rides, kids.”

4

The indie superhero movie Sleight hits theaters nationwide on Friday, April 28. First-time director J.D. Dillard presented Sleight at the 2016 Sundance Film Festival, where it competed in the NEXT category for bold, pure works with an innovative and forward-thinking approach to storytelling. 

After a young street magician is left to care for his little sister following their mother’s passing, he turns to dealing drugs, but he quickly runs into trouble with his supplier. When his sister gets kidnapped, he must rely on his smarts and sleight of hand to save her.

Check out the the trailer here!

© 2016 Sundance Institute | Photo by Stephen Speckman © 2016 Sundance Institute | Photo by Stephen Speckman ; Poster courtesy of Sleight ; © 2016 Photo by Robin Marchant/WireImage

Native Superheroes Quick Checks

@marvelousmrmothman said: What about Dani Moonstar?

Yep, she’d be an example of a Native who has magic but is not a Magical Native American because it’s a mutation. I knew I was forgetting a pretty big name in that post.

Basically, anything where the superhero origin is “mutation causes x” or “got powers because of [insert freak accident here]” is much, much more likely to be safe. Note I specify freak accident. Something that happened because of neglect or colonialism or natural resources being exploited is dodgy at best.

“Ancient cultural ritual” or “has powers inspired by [Native cultural thing]” is something to be wary of. If it’s Native written, that’s one thing, but if it’s non-Native written, that is very much another.

Also, when considering superhero origins, keep in mind what I said in Giving Jewish and Rromani characters chemically triggered superpowers in your sci-fi story. Poisoned water for a Native superhero origin story would be in very bad taste considering NoDAPL, as would any viral or bacterial infections because of tribes being purposely given blankets laced with these illnesses. 

That also kinda puts words to why I am not terribly fond of the premise of Kushala. She’s a product of genocide, and “accidentally” praying to the wrong god feels pretty wrong. Her origins is something that is deeply culturally tied and leverages Native pain to create somebody with awesome powers, which is veering into tragedy exploitation. 

~Mod Lesya