magical friday

7

General Use Sigils

So sigils are a HUGE part of my magic.  Between them and herbs, they make up most of my craft.  I’ll be doing a big post of what sigils are and how to make them tomorrow, but wanted to share with you guys some I made recently.  These were created using Nordic Runes (though with some liberties for design).  I hope you enjoy.

~Elyce

Sometimes Friday nights are lonely. And sometimes that´s ok. 

 “Start Again” . From the witchy series I’m working on. Expect to hear about them soooon.*:・゚✧ 

anonymous asked:

magical tattoos? like tattoos with special properties or they move around on skin or smth?

  • After turning 18, every kid is required to go to special tattoo parlor where the town’s resident mage gives them a tattoo. No one knows what the tattoo will be until it’s done, not even the mage. The tattoo forms itself into a symbol that will become very important in the person’s life. On Character A’s 18th birthday, their tattoo forms itself into a crown.
  • Character A convinces their best friend, Character B, to go get a tattoo. Not wanting anything big, Character B gets a small flower on their back. The next morning, Character A gasps when they see Character B’s entire back covered in vines and leaves and flowers, and they only seem to be spreading further.
  • Everyone gets one tattoo in their life, and that tattoo gives them a power of their choosing. Character A really wants the power to see through objects, so they get a pair of eyes. However, after a series of visions, they come to realize the power that manifested was actually seeing into the future.
  • “I’m a mage and have been searching for an apprentice for years by pushing a little bit of magic into everyone tattoo I give, just to see if anyone reacts to it. None had, until I gave you yours. The second the needle touched your skin, ink started flowing into patterns everywhere. Please stop freaking out” AU
  • When tattoos start appearing on one’s body overnight, it’s a sign that they’re meant to join the War of Magic. However, Character A’s parents are major pacifists and hate the war, so Character A begins their own struggle as they try to hide the growing tattoos their parents.
  • “I’ve been told all my life that moving tattoos were normal – a sign of being healthy. But I don’t think that means the tattoos are supposed to come off of my skin and fly around? Cause that’s why I’ve been hiding out in my room all week” AU

anonymous asked:

Hi! I was wondering if you had any dragon aus? Like humanoid ones. Thank you!

  • “Normally my wings aren’t that big of a problem, but you tapped my shoulder too hard and it startled me and oh my god, your nose is bleeding. Please sit down. I am so so sorry.” AU
  • Character A and Character B both have a similar horded item. As a result, Character A begins to majorly crush on Character B, and as a show of their affection, Character A gives Character B an item from their hoard (which would be a BIG deal).
  • Because of a skin issue, Character A’s scales are constantly dull and growing in patchy, which causes Character A to be really self conscious about showing any skin/scales. Character B is really into beauty routines and offers to give Character A a lesson on how to properly care for their scales.
  • “I mean, I’m already pretty short when I’m in my semi-human form, but when I’m in my full dragon form…well…promise you won’t laugh?” AU
  • Character A runs an shop that caters to many different dragon aesthetics – tiny spoons, plastic figurines, jewels, etc. – and Character B likes to stop in a lot. Though Character A notices that Character B’s interests don’t ever really follow a pattern that a usual dragon’s hoarding patterns would. Are they just coming into the shop to see Character A?
  • “I have to admit, I make a great snuggle buddy because of how warm my body naturally runs…just in case you ever get cold.” AU
Foodie Friday: Candied Violets

*WARNING: This recipe uses raw egg whites and flowers. Please make sure that your flowers are of an edible variety, and grown pesticide-free, for safety’s sake (especially in this recipe, be sure to avoid using African violets, which are not edible). Be sure that if you are in the US, your eggs are of a high grade, and that the egg whites are properly prepared for use. 

Servings: Varies
Ingredients:
-Whole edible violets, fresh and with stems still attached
-1 egg white per cup of loosely packed flowers
-1 cup superfine or castor sugar
-A fine paintbrush (if you don’t have one dedicated to food, then get one… please do not use a paintbrush from the studio…)

1. Gently wash the flowers by placing them in a sieve and gently spraying them with water. Gently shake off excess moisture and set them out in a single layer on a rack or absorbent towel to dry.

2. Allow the egg white to reach room temperature. Use a whisk to gently whip it until it is slightly frothy.

3. Using the paintbrush, gently coat the flower petals with egg white, holding the flower by the stem. Then sprinkle sugar over the flower until it is completely coated. Set it out on a sheet of parchment or wax paper to dry.

4. Allow the violets to dry for up to 24 hours so that they completely dry out. When dry, cut the stems off at the base of the flower. Store in an airtight container (shelf life of up to a month) and serve either alone as a treat, or as an edible garnish on cookies, cupcakes, cakes, et cetera.

Magical Ingredient!

So it’s been fairly busy in the restaurant of late, as students come back from spring break, and families come into the county to celebrate Easter. The Christian Holy Week is in full force, so I’ve spent a fair amount of my time cooking tilapia, shrimp, and salmon. With this Foodie Friday, I decided it was high time I took a break from seafood in favor of a sweet little spring treat that’s been cherished since the Victorian era.

Flowers are a mainstay in witchcraft, and why shouldn’t they be. Not only do they signify fertility and rebirth, they’re beautiful, and every herb and plant holds some sort of property that we as witches may incorporate into our practice. Witches who focus on herbs and plants, be they green witches, garden witches, or -yes- even kitchen witches, often have entire charts worth of correspondences just for how to use plants in their practice.

Here, however, I’m going to be focusing on our featured recipe and look at violets. The recipe can, of course, be adapted for any edible flower, but if I were to go into detail about every flower that you could eat, I’d be here all night (not a good thing since I have to be back at the restaurant in a few hours)!

Violets are exceptional spring flowers for use in love, luck, lust, and protection spells, as well as sweetening spells. Depending on your practice, the use of the violet may differ!

First, we’ll address teas. Violets in tea are often used to ease pain and fever, a practice that was particularly prominent in Romanian and Chinese medicine. In addition, it was common in Ancient Greece to use violets to help moderate anger, aid sleep, and ease depression - a property that would later also give the violet another common name: “heart’s ease.”

Rich in vitamins A and C, as well as various other nutrients, violets are an early spring edible that can be added to many different recipes, from vinegars to syrups and even salads, giving the kitchen witch plenty of options to play with in working with this little flower.

In matters of love, the flowers can be used in sachets, teas, or foods to help encourage faithfulness in a relationship or to encourage a growth of love and/or lust. Meanwhile, the leaves can be used in green sachets to promote luck and wealth.

The roots are great for cleansing, as they can be dried and added to incense for smoke cleansing.

Combining violets and lavender makes for a particularly potent form of protection and luck, as well as love, spell. This approach can be used in any way that you use the flower, be it burning in an incense, cooking, or creating a witch bag.

For the kitchen witch, violets are versatile and can be used in many recipes. Add the flowers and leaves to a salad, make a floral syrup or vinegar, candy them, or create a floral water. These are just a few ideas of what you can do with violets.

Ultimately, to sum all of this up, violets are a little flower sometimes approached as a weed. But in terms of medicine, culinary use, and witchcraft, this little weed is actually an early spring treasure. Consider different ways to incorporate violets into your practice (and your recipes), and see where this little blossom takes you!

Bonus Spell!

Josh’s Self-Love Candy Jar

-Make candied violets as above, visualizing happiness, health, and confidence as you do so. Channel this intent into the crafting of the snack for extra umph.

-Cleanse a jar and begin adding your flowers, chanting or focusing on positive affirmations as you add each flower: “By the first flower, I find joy in the small things. By the second flower, I see my inner beauty. By the third flower, I see beauty around me…”

-When the jar is full, enchant it as a whole before adding the lid. For added effect, draw or trace a symbol or sigil for your intent on the lid or jar.

-Once a day, eat a candied violet while visualizing that intent. You feed the spell by feeding yourself!

May all your meals be blessed!
Blessed Be! )O(

anonymous asked:

I was wondering if you had any supernatural identical twin aus? (Vampire, werewolf, phoenix, etc.) Thanks!

  • Character A is attacked one night, and wakes up having turned into a werewolf. One of the first things they notice is how their twin sibling smells subtly of fire and smoke, all the time. Character B is a Phoenix, and has been since birth, but was told not to tell anyone, even their twin, lest it put them in danger. But now it seems that doesn’t matter, because Character A finds out on their own.
  • Character A and Character B are both vampires constantly hiding from hunters. However, one day, they’re ambushed and taken by the hunters, who then experiment on them to study both the healing of vampires and the link between identical twins.
  • “You’re a what?” “I’m a Reaper.” “So all this time I thought I was about to die for no reason was because I could feel you taking people’s souls?” “… Maybe.” AU
  • Being immortal certainly has it’s perks, especially for two identical twins that enjoy nothing more than playing pranks on people. It’s not long until the siblings are attracting attention, though, and soon enough their are conspiracy theories popping up all over the world about this person that has been around for centuries, and also manages to be in two places at once.
  • “I’ve been trapped here for weeks now, because these enemies of yours don’t believe that I’m not you, and they keep telling me to show them my ‘true form’, which they say includes wings, and I’m getting the feeling there’s something you haven’t been telling me” AU
  • Character A, a werewolf, has been having some problems with bullies at school, but the physical attributes that come with lycanthropy haven’t kicked in yet. However, Character B, their twin sibling, was an early bloomer. Together they devise a plan to take those bullies down.
Foodie Friday: Healing in the Kitchen

Servings: Varies

Ingredients:

-1 tbsp peppermint leaves (about one tea bag)
-1 tbsp chamomile (about one tea bag)
-½ tsp cinnamon
-½ tsp ginger
-¾ cup boiling water
-¾ cup honey (raw local honey is recommended)
-Optional: Powdered sugar, Powdered vitamin C, or Cornstarch for dusting

1. Steep your herbs in the boiling water for about 10 minutes, then strain and save the tea.

2. In a small saucepan, combine the tea and honey and heat to a gentle boil over medium heat.

3. Continue boiling until the mixture reaches a temperature of about 300 degrees Fahrenheit. Keep careful watch, as honey can burn very easily.

4. Take off of heat and allow the syrup to cool for about 5-10 minutes.

5. Transfer syrup onto parchment paper in small spoonfuls (recommended teaspoon) and allow to cool to room temperature.

6. If desired, dust the lozenges with powdered sugar, powdered vitamin C, or cornstarch. This will absorb moisture, keeping the lozenges dry and preventing them from sticking in storage.

Note: The consistency of the lozenges may vary. There are several factors that play into this, including water loss, honey quantity, temperature variation, and weather.

Magical Ingredient!

Here in California, we’ve been blessed with some lovely rains! And while it’s absolutely wonderful to see the green come back after five long years of drought, it does come with a few downsides. The first is that mosquito populations boom. The second is that erosion issues that we hadn’t anticipated are cropping up all over the place. And the third is that with more moisture also comes a new rash of cold and flu.

Kitchen witchcraft is not limited to delectable dinner dishes. Nor is it limited to baking or crafting culinary delights. It is also very practical and encompasses herbal remedies that can be worked in the home. And so, it seemed right to share a recipe for homemade throat lozenges. All of the ingredients are tools of the kitchen witch, from the water to the tea, but of all of the ingredients, one stands out: honey.

Last week, we covered various alcohols and how liquor has been a staple of human consumption for most of human history, but honey mead is one of the primary drinks that come to light in that topic. In addition, honey has been a natural sweetener that humanity has loved since the dawn of time, even reaching a state where its presence represents prosperity and happiness (”land of milk and honey,” anyone?), and even wealth due to its golden color.

This image of wealth is further ingrained when considering the hard work put in by honeybees to produce honey, followed by their ferocity in protecting it when the hive is low on stores. Much like how one would work hard to acquire or earn wealth, and then protect their money when it’s been obtained.

Honey is, by far, one of the most cherished ingredients for its antibacterial properties and its natural sweetness. It is a natural preservative, and is far healthier than sugars due to its chemical makeup. In addition, it is an ingredient that has helped make many much more environmentally aware…

Domesticated honeybees (from which we get most of our honey) will produce close to 80 pounds of surplus honey per year, which is why beekeeping has been such a successful trade for so many centuries. In the late summer, beekeepers will remove wooden frames from the hives on which the surplus honey is stored (contrary to popular belief, the majority of beekeepers harvest honey in non-invasive ways which don’t stress the colony, and never harvest the stores the bees require for survival). This honey and the comb are then separated, processed (in some cases), and made ready for sale. By the time it reaches the plastic bottle as a clear golden syrup, it’s been pasteurized (depending upon the country’s health regulations) and processed.

From the store, one can pick up either processed or “raw” honey, which contains trace amounts of pollen from the nectar the bees had used to make it. This makes raw honey an excellent way of bolstering the immune system against the symptoms of seasonal allergies, in addition to the other traits honey has.

Honey’s composition is roughly 17 percent water, with most (not all) of the rest being natural sugars. As a result, if any bacteria, fungi, or molds try to settle on it, the water contained within them gets pulled out, killing them and preventing honey from spoiling. In addition, depending upon the flowers that the bees had pollinated, the nectar could have additional antibacterial properties (manuka honey, for instance, is particularly good at this and is used as an antibacterial in hospitals). Our ancestors recognized the healing properties of honey, and would add it to poultices and other remedies that would be applied directly to wounds, much as we would with Neosporin today.

From the witchy perspective, there really isn’t anything to dislike about honey. First, there’s its color, which is excellent for wealth and prosperity spells. Second, there is its healing properties, which are excellent for both remedies and for healing spells. Third, is its sweetness, which can serve to enhance the sweetening spells, and makes it an excellent offering to fairies and gods alike! Pairing they variant of honey with your purposes adds a whole new level of magic to your craft, as well! For instance, if you want to encourage prosperity and luck, use clover honey; alternatively, if you want to use honey for cleansing and healing, use rosemary honey instead!

A less common thought when it comes to using honey in magic is to incorporate its creator into the work. Bees are tireless workers, often inspiring bee enthusiasts and beekeepers alike, and it’s their effective communication and work ethic that can be incorporated into spellwork involving honey. If you need a spell to encourage productivity and energy, honey is a great go-to ingredient due to the bees’ tireless efforts. 

Like any ingredient, intent is key: channel your intent and energy into the honey before adding it to food or drink, or before adding it to a sweetening jar. If you’re making an offer of honey, consider what it may represent to the deities or spirits that it is meant for.

Lastly, another reason many witches appreciate honey is as I had mentioned above: it has helped increase environmental awareness. With bee populations struggling, it is important to consider ways to help “save the bees.” More specifically, save the environment. Honeybees are most well known to us, but they aren’t the only kind of bee present in our lives. Many species don’t produce honey but are integral to pollination. What makes them less noticeable is their subterranean nests throughout most of the year. Many witches feel a deep respect for the earth and for all animals, and bees are not alone in this. Consider switching from sugar to honey in most recipes to help bring honey’s properties into your life while helping fund further developments in beekeeping, and be sure to thank  the bees in your life for their hard work and inspiration!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(

anonymous asked:

dark/horror fairy au's??? oh my gosh

  • “Let go of my arm! I had no choice! I had to bring the faeries a sacrifice or they would drag me into their world! I’m sorry but this is the way that it has to be!” AU
  • While walking home one night, Character A looks down at their phone for just a second, but when they look up the familiar street around them has melted into a strange, eldritch parody of itself. Scared and confused, Character A watches in horror as a figure detaches themself from the shadows and makes their way over to Character A. The figure is terrifying – beautiful to the point where they frighten Character A – and they explain that Character A has accidentally wandered into a fairy’s territory and that they’ll need to pay a toll/solve a riddle/outsmart the fairy in a game/etc. in order to get back home.
  • “You’ve made a very bad choice, human. Don’t you know if you eat any food when you’re in fairyland then you’re here forever?” AU
  • After making a deal with Character B, a fairy, Character A has been working for years to pay off their debt. Character A has learned to curb their screams whenever they’re approached by fairies – the hollow eyes and abnormally skeletal bodies never stop terrifying Character A – but lately the fairies have been restless, and Character A thinks it might be time of the year where they begin looking for human sacrifices again.
  • Character A is a fairy that was born with a certain knack for glamour magic. Where most fairies can make themselves appear human, they still have an air of unsettling alienness that tends to unnerve humans. Character A can pass with ease, and they use this to their advantage to lure humans into fairyland. One night, while toying with humans at a popular club, they run into Character B, a human that can see straight through Character A’s glamour and sees their true form.
  • “My eyes? Funny story. I used to think I was crazy because I kept seeing things that weren’t there, but it turns out that I had the sight…’had’ being the key word here. I saw a fairy’s true form and they replaced my eyes with gems/flowers/sea glass/etc.” AU
Foodie Friday: Pasta al Pomodoro

Servings: 2-4

Ingredients:
-¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
-1 medium onion, minced
-4 garlic cloves, minced
-Pinch crushed red pepper flakes
-28 oz. can peeled tomatoes, pureed
-Kosher or Sea salt
-3 large basil sprigs, plus basil leaves for garnish
-12 oz pasta of choice (spaghetti, linguine, rotini, or cavatappi recommended)
-2 tbsp unsalted butter
-¼ cup finely grated parmesan, pecorino, or romano cheese

1. Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium-low heat. Add onion and cook, stirring, until soft. In a separate pot, bring salted water to a boil.

2. Add garlic and cook, stirring, for about 2-4 minutes (remember to use your nose and keep close attention on fragrance; you don’t want the garlic to burn)

3. Add the pepper flakes and cook for about a minute to release flavor. Increase the heat to medium, add t he tomatoes, and season lightly with salt. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the sauce begins to thicken slightly and the flavors blend (roughly 20 minutes).

4. Remove the pan from heat, stir in the basil sprigs, and set aside.

5. In the pot, add pasta to the boiling water and cook, stirring occasionally until it is close to al dente (but not quite there yet). Drain the pasta, reserving about ½ a cup of the pasta water.

6. Remove the basil from the sauce and heat the skillet over high heat. Stir in the reserved water to loosen the sauce and bring to a boil. Add pasta and cook, stirring, until al dente. Remove the pan from the heat, add butter and cheese, and toss until the cheese and butter has melted.

7. Transfer to warm bowls, and garnish with grated cheese and basil leaves or parsley.

Magical Ingredient

When I get home from work, my boyfriend sometimes comments about how I smell. As I work in an Italian kitchen, this can either be a good thing or a bad thing for him. On a good day, I end up smelling like alfredo with a hint of garlic. On a bad day, I come home smelling strongly of tomatoes. Love them or hate them, it’s difficult to separate the tomato from Italian cooking. From savory to sweet, tomatoes have a wonderful range of flavor depending upon how they’re cooked, and they lend a vibrant red color to whatever dish they’re being made into.

Given how strong of an association tomatoes have to Italian cuisine, it’s sometimes easy to forget that historically, tomatoes are actually fairly new to European cooking, having been introduced as part of the Columbian Exchange and spurned because of its status as a member of the nightshade family of plants, much like potatoes and eggplant. It wouldn’t be for another 150 years before tomatoes would be considered safe for consumption, and even then, only in sauces.

Part of the fear of tomatoes was because of its link to deadly nightshade, but another aspect of this fear was due to its connection to lust. Its deep red color and use as a powerful aphrodisiac linked it rather strongly to the temptation of Eve in the Christian Genesis story, and some languages still associate tomatoes with lust and love (particularly French - pomme d’amore - and Hungarian - paradice appfel - which mean “apple of love” and “apple of paradise” respectively).

In terms of health, tomatoes are extremely beneficial for those who aren’t allergic or sensitive to their acidity. In particular, they’re useful in aiding liver function and are rich in potassium and citric acid. In addition, their high water content makes them useful in helping with hydration.

But in witchcraft, the tomato continues to embrace its status as an ingredient of lust, love, protection, and money-drawing - especially when paired with other ingredients with shared correspondences. When dried and added to sachets, tomatoes can be excellent in attracting love (or sex), or if added along with dried basil or rosemary can be a great money sachet or protection sachet respectively.

Consider pairing tomato varieties with your purpose. If attempting to attract money, consider using a golden variety or little green tomatillos. If working lust or love spells, plump red tomatoes are always a great choice. If looking for protection, consider fiery orange colors.

Many names for tomatoes have linked them to apples. As such, it’s not too great a leap to replace apples in other spells with tomatoes, if it seems appropriate or is more accessible. On the flip side, tomatoes can also be used in spells where nightshade may be an ingredient. While not poisonous, tomatoes are much more easily obtained and the family resemblance is rather uncanny.

For garden witchery, tomatoes are exceptional plants to grow for protection and wealth. Grow them to help banish negativity and invite positive energy to the property, as well as to encourage prosperity and love.

Consider different ways in which this delicious fruit can be used in your spells! Whether cooking up a sauce, roasting them, or setting them in the window to banish negative energy, tomatoes are useful and versatile ingredients for the every day witch!

May all your meals be blessed! )O(

Shout out to black people who:

- don’t like/listen to rap/hip hop
- can’t dance
- like classical music/play classical instruments
- don’t have a “hip” fashion sense
- “”“”“”“talk white”“”“”“”
- don’t have any black friends
- have never had soul food (because they can’t access it)
- can’t eat/don’t like spicy foods

This is my second shoutout post for black people and I just want to say again, if you don’t have access to your black culture that does not make you any less black!!!!! Not fitting into one subculture doesn’t erase your blackness. It’s ok to have different interests and I love you 💕💕💕💕💕💕