magical amulets

Random joke magic items

Here’s a list of random joke items to use for fun in your campaign. I’d recommend adding them to treasure hoards rather than subbing normal items for them.
Anyway here they are:

1. Ace of Spades - An ace of spades from a standard card deck. No matter where you store it on your body, you will always be able to find it in your right sleeve afterwards.

2. Amulet of Extra Amulet Slot - This amulet allows you to gain the benefit from two magical amulets rather than one. It cannot be further enchanted.

3. Amulet of Feather Fall - When worn, this amulet turns into a feather and falls to the ground.

4. Amulet of Unbreaking Bones - Con-man says you can’t break any bones. Really, he means other’s bones. -100% damage against skeletons.

5. Amulet of weather detection - yells that it is or is not raining.

6. Anti-Matches - A box of matches. Striking one will make it begin to drip water from the tip while the match shrivels away. The amount of water a match releases is about enough to fill a tablespoon.

7. Arrow of Euarere - A silver arrow, suspended on a string. It always points to the person holding the string.

8. Arrow of Slaying, The - This magical arrow is capable of killing a creature.

9. Artist’s Bludgeon, The - Inanimate objects hit with this bludgeon will receive no damage; they will however change color.

10. Attentive Guardsman’s Pike - These ornate and deadly-looking ceremonial pikes are reach weapons and appear to weigh at least 20 lbs, not counting the weight of the fluttering banners that can be unfurled for parade use. Constructed of shadowstuff, they weigh one pound, and inflict only a single point of damage on an attack, being almost entirely for show, although they also have the unique property of remaining in place when set (although unable to support more than 20 lbs), allowing a ‘resting his eyes’ guardsman to prop it up and leave it standing under its own power, while his hand sags off of it.

11. Attentive Guardsman’s Tabard - A dozen of these tabards were fashioned for palace guardsmen in the Empire of Sard, 250 miles from the nearest enemy. The bearer is placed under a glamour that causes him to appear alert and awake, even if his eyes are closed and he is snoring lightly.

12. Axe of Big Numbers - This axe shouts “Big numbers baby, come on!” whenever it is swung, but always deals 1 damage or less.

13. Axe of Empathy - Every time you hit something with this +5 greataxe, you get dealt an equal amount of damage. Both you and the thing you hit are then healed the amount of damage dealt by the axe, even if either are dead. The Axe hopes you have learned your lesson.

14. Axe of Pain - The axe is always moaning and groaning with pain.

15. Bag of Faerie Gold - This sack appears to be full of gold coins and jewels. When one attempts to spend them, however, the glamour on them soon vanishes, revealing them to be nothing but leaves and pebbles. Obviously, most shopkeepers will not be happy about this, and no amount of ‘we didn’t know, I swear!’ will change their mind.

16. Bag of Holding - This item functions as a normal backpack, however when attempting to retrieve an item, a calm female voice tells them there is a wait time of 4d10 minutes before they can retrieve their item (actual time is stated time plus 6d6 additional minutes). During this wait, the bag plays either annoying muzak or advertisements for the bag’s creator’s other products/services. Upon attempting to retrieve an item, there is a chance that the wrong item is retrieved, or that the intended item is simply missing. Obtaining the original item requires an additional 4d10+6d6 minutes and has only a 5% chance of success.

17. Bag of Trading - You can take one thing out of the bag for each object you put in the bag. However, you have no control over what you get, and there are no trade-backs. Past research seems to imply there’s some sort of correlation to what gets you what, but it’s extremely convoluted and far from understood.

18. Bag of Trick - This bag operates like a Bag of Tricks, except it only works once a week and produces a rat each time it is used.

19. Bag of Unholding - Quite a large backpack but even the smallest item doesn’t fit.

20. Bagpipe of Stealth - Grants the user invisibility as long as it is being played.

21. Ball of Eyes - A snow-globe filled with miniature eyeballs. When shaken, it grants the user a blurry, jittery vision of some future event.

22. Banana Walkie-Talkies - There exist two, and only two, of these items in the world. One of which is possessed by a cranky and lonely half-orc. It appears to be an innocuous wooden banana with a coat of faded yellow paint. When an end (doesn’t matter which one) is placed against your ear, you can hear a ringing followed by a click and a half-orc yelling at you for waking him up at this ungodly hour. If you drop the banana or “hang up,” the call ends. If you stay and listen, the half-orc will yell at you, call out obscenities, and start going on about his daily problems and mishaps in his love life. Every so often (2% chance/day), the banana will ring while you are sleeping and the half-orc will want to talk to you about his problems.

23. Barrel of Holding - This large wooden barrel measuring √(12/π) feet in diameter and 5 feet in height can hold up to 15 cubic feet of matter.

24. Beam Sword of Severed Nerves - A beam sword. It cannot cut anything but nerve strings. Will pass through any other material leaving no harm.

25. Belt of Pants - This belt creates illusory pants on the wearer. The wearer can suppress the illusion at will

26. Belt of Tightening - Every time you put this belt on, all of your clothes permanently shrink a fraction of a millimeter. The effect is compound.

27. Belt of Unbathed Breath - When worn around the waist, allows the user to breathe underwater. Does not function when wet.

28. Boogie Skeleton - This pile of bones is small, such as one that might be obtained from a bird or a toad, though it can look as though it came from any creature. When a song is sung or played in the vicinity of the skeleton, it begins to dance appropriately. As soon as the music stops, it collapses into the pile of bones again. The skeleton, when dancing, can be no larger than Diminutive.

29. Book of Canon - A book that automatically transforms into a copy of the sacred text of any religion, translated into the language the user is most familiar with.

30. Book of Confusion - The letters in this book always appear to be upside down, even if viewed from different directions at the same time. The book is a bad novel about zombies.

31. Book of Curses - When opened, the book verbally berates anyone in the immediate vicinity, calling into question their combat ability, intellect, personal hygiene, lineage and profession of their mothers, and other delightful insults. Once closed the book continues shouting (although it is muffled) until placed inside a bag or some other similar container for 1d4+1 minutes and ignored. Replying to the book in any other way causes the insults to get louder and more childish the more time you spend replying to it.

32. Book of Exalted Deeds - Contains a listing of some of the finest houses ever sold and the specifics of the titles to the properties.

33. Boots of Blinding Speed - The wearer’s speed is doubled, and they are blinded.

34. Boots of Levitation - These boots levitate a few inches off the ground when not worn.

35. Boots of Stylishness - Knee high black boots that are always clean and shiny. They never take in water, thus feet are always dry.

36. Boots of Teleportation - Allows the player to teleport wherever they like, but don’t carry the wearer with them when activated; the boots teleport just fine, though.

37. Boots of Walking - The wearer of the boots cannot run, nor can he take a double move action, and takes a -5 to Tumble checks. These boots are made for walkin’, and that’s just what they’ll do.

38. Bottle of Air - It’s a bottle. Full of air. Congratulations.

39. Bottomless Beer Mug - Any liquid poured into this mug treats the bottom as incorporeal, but solid objects don’t.

40. Bowl of Comfortable Warmth - Any liquid in the bowl will feel comfortably warm, so icy cold water will feel like it’s a bit over room temperature. Do note, however, that it’s still icy cold water, it just feels warmer.

50. Breastplate of Secret Detection - If the wearer of this breastplate gains a piece of information that is somehow connected to the concealment of a hidden conspiracy or plot, a live and still wet red herring forms on the inside of the armor.

51. Bullying Gloves - At random intervals, these gloves instil the wearer with a near-irresistible urge to hit themselves.

52. Bunyan’s Belt - When worn, causes an enormous, bushy black beard to appear on the wearer’s face.

53. Cape of Resistance - When this item is placed on any living thing it somehow manages to fall off, untie itself, slip past the owner’s neck entirely, or otherwise avoid being worn.

54. Case of the Litigator - Translates any document placed in the case into legal jargon; non-reversible. Does not confer the ability to understand legal jargon.

55. Cat of Schrodinger - When this cat is not being observed in any way it is both dead and alive. When something observes it, it suddenly becomes either dead or alive with a 50% chance of either.

56. Chair of Steadiness - This chair can be moved but cannot be tipped over by anything less than a DC 35 Strength check.

57. Charles - This small, unremarkable figurine of a gnome refuses to be called anything but Charles. No other name will leave the lips of the speaker. It has no other powers.

58. Chime of Interruption - This instrument can be struck once every round, which takes a standard action. On any round the chime is activated the user may ready one action without spending an action to do so.

59. Chime of Opening - Commonly affixed to or near doors, when pressed it emits a sound on the interior of the owner’s home to let them know guests have arrived.

60. Chime of Opening (Alternate) - When struck against a solid surface, this chime emits a loud click, and opens along its length, to reveal a tiny compartment adequate to conceal a single 'smoke’ worth of pipeweed or a blowgun needle. When the compartment is closed, it is seamless and can be detected only with a DC 20 Search check. If hit with an instrument such as a small mallet, it chimes.

61. Cloak of Billowing - This black and silver cloak will always billow dramatically behind the wearer, it has no other effects.

62. Cloak of Displacement, Minor - This item appears to be a normal cloak, but when worn by a character its magical properties distort and warp reality. When any attack is made against the wearer the cloak has a 20% chance of falling off, no matter how it is secured.

63. Compacting hammer - The force imparted by it is multiplied, but is spread around the surface of a struck object facing inward.

64. Cymbal of Symbols - This musical instrument enables the user to comprehend dead languages, but only while they are deafened by noise.

65. Dagger of Told Secrets - A simple-looking dagger. If used to backstab someone to death, it will whisper your most embarrassing secret to that person.

66. Dagger of unnatural sharpness - The blade is exceptionally sharp to your touch. It confers no combat bonuses but can be used as a normal dagger for fighting or crafting, but the user seems to always cut himself in minor ways when using it.

67. Dagger of Untold Secrets - A simple looking dagger. If used to backstab someone to death, it will whisper the most embarrassing secret of that person to you.

68. Decanter of Endless Sorrow - A pewter flask that produces limitless alcohol when held to their lips by someone who is troubled. It gets them drunk but they never feel any better.

69. Diadem of Brothaurity - When wearing this headpiece, you are as elegant and well-spoken as a famous diplomat or regent, but you can’t stop calling everyone bro.

70. Enchanted Book of Collected Stories - Opening this will cause miniature creatures/people to pour out and perform a chapter from the book much like a theater.

71. Focusing Ring - The digit on which this ring is worn can be viewed in extremely high definition from a great distance.

72. Gloves of Tinkering - Wearing the gloves will make you able to almost repair any broken item. However, you will always end up with pieces from the item that don’t seem to fit anywhere.

73. Glowing sword of orc detection - When it gets orc blood on it the sword glows.

74. Good Luck ring - Gives your enemies good luck!

75. Greater Staff of Random Summoning - Summons a random creature at a random place. You could be summoning a giant Ogre on the other side of the globe for all you know.

76. Helm of Awareness, The - The wearer is acutely aware of the fact that they are wearing this helmet and that it has a magical effect. - All you need to do to make this work as a DM is frequently remind the player that the helm is magical while they are wearing it but be evasive about exactly what it does.

77. Hoarder’s Wand - Does nothing but for some reason you think it might be important later in your quest.

78. Hood of Offensive Facades - This hood will change your identity in the eyes of others to the appearance of the person they most personally dislike.

79. Hood Of Worrisome Facades - This hood will change your identity in the eyes of others, however the identity used will be random.

80. Indestructible Notebook of Memories - This otherwise normal notepad of normal notepad size cannot be damaged or destroyed, and anything written in it cannot be obscured or defaced. It also has unlimited pages despite its finite size. However, the data it holds only lasts as long as the writer independently remembers it, and decays in exact proportion to the relevant memories. Remember who and when, but not where? Then the words describing the location in that particular entry are the only ones gone.

81. Intransigent Rod - When the button on this artifact is pressed in, the holder’s opinions solidify and they become impossible to convince.

82. Key to anywhere - opens any door into a closet with a water bucket that falls and hits the player’s head. Inside this closet is the treasure of true adventurers. If opened with a key, it opens a closet…

83. Lunch Box of Delicious Unfulfillment - This lunch box will hold whatever food you desire. However you will never get full and the food will deliver no nourishment.

84. Mask of Concealment - Hides the wearer’s face and conceals everything from them by blocking their eyes! Bonus points for requiring a strength check or a time limit to expire to be removed.

85. Mattress of Poverty, The - No matter how you fluff this gorgeous, thick, mattress, you will always sleep on the thin part of it.

86. Mug O’ Dissatisfaction - A mug that always produces a steaming hot cup of coffee or tea when tapped on the bottom. It conjures the opposite of what the tapper prefers, so if you like tea you get coffee and vice versa. Handing the full mug to another person will make the drink in it transform to the opposite of that person’s preferences.

87. Murder Dagger - All damage it would deal is instead replaced by the target being harassed by crows for that many hours.

88. Needle Of Learned Compromise - This needle will create beautiful tattoos of any design, however they hurt a tiny bit more. When used to sew it is entirely normal.

89. Portable Dark Tavern Corner - Consisting of two wooden boards connected by a hinge, this artifact draws those nearby into assuming it is a perfect spot to conduct seedy business.

90. Potion of fire breathing - For the length of time that the potion is in effect, every breath out is on fire, whether you want it to be or not.

91. Potion of Quelchment - Cures thirst when consumed

92. Ring of Fire Detection - becomes warm when placed into Fire.

93. Ring of First Impression - Wearing the ring will make you able to perform a perfect handshake with the hand wearing it.

94. Ring of Stoneskin - Turns your skin, muscles, and organs into stone! Character is now a stationary statue. Can’t be reversed until someone takes the ring off.

95. Rope of Entanglement - Becomes entangled when left in a pack

96. Sack of Hive Eggs - Crushing one of the numerous tiny eggs will cause the thoughts of everybody in the proximity to merge. Everybody can hear what you think and you can hear everybody.

97. Shirt of fire protection - this shirt is sopping wet.

98. Shoes of the Restless Traveler - These shoes allow their user to run for miles without feeling fatigue, but if they try to do anything else with it (walk, sit down, jump), they will instantly trip

99. Sword of Parrying - Parries every attack, swinging it yourself will force it to “parry” your opponent’s weapon/attack even though he/she/it is defenseless.

100. Torch of Night Vision - grants bearer Night Vision while lit.

101. Vorpal Grindstone - It can “sharpen” any object to become vorpal. Any object.

102. Wand of command - Lets your character be controlled after saying the command word!

103. Wand of Create Wand of Create Wand - Creates a Wand of Create Wand. Consumes original Wand.

104. Wand of Pigeon Summoning - summons 1d20 pigeons everyday. On a 20 it breaks and summons a giant pigeon god (can be the size of Godzilla or like 5 pigeons.) Giant pigeon god should be in the mid 20s for CR, but is uninterested in attacking, and will simply fly away when summoned.

105. Water Hat, The - A small red hat, when worn, causes water to pour from the wearer’s fingers at the speed and pressure of a kitchen faucet at half power.

106. Wineskin of the Eternal Primary - This wineskin never runs out of water, but even the tiniest sip makes you have to go potty, like, super bad. Right now.

Power of the Heart Self-Love Spell (W.I.T.C.H. Inspired)

A spell to open yourself up to your own love and sense of self-worth.

You Will Need:

💕 Jar or Glass container

💕 Rose Quartz

💕 Water

💕 A Necklace or Amulet

💕 Moonlight

Steps:

💕 Fill your glass container with water and place in your rose quartz. In a window or outside place your water over night, preferably during a full moon. (any moon will do if you’re in a pinch)

💕 Come morning collect your water and bring it to your work area

💕 Hold your necklace cupped in your hands. Whisper to it your desires to start loving yourself and building your self worth. Visualize it glowing as you whisper these words to it, a soft dim pink. Once you have finished your words kiss it gently putting more of your wishes to love yourself into it.

💕 Holding it by its chain/string with both hands via your pointer finger and thumb lower it slowly into the gem water below until the charm/stone/pendent is submerged fully

💕 Time for more intense visualization: focus on the bowl as it glows with a warm pink light that shines bright like a fire and pulses like a beating heart. See it fill the necklace and make the necklace’s glow more intense until the water is no longer glowing and the light is coming from the necklace, pulsing and beating.

💕 Lift the necklace from the water and gently dab dry then put it on. Feel as it lays against your chest how its energy pulses and beats, warm and close to your heart. Let it warm you. Wear it whenever you need to love yourself.

💕 To cleanse leave in the moonlight and to charge simply repeat spell process above.

Neo-Assyrian Obsidian Lamaštu Demon Magic Amulet, 8th-7th Century BC

See it in 360°

The obverse with an incised image of the demon Lamashtu with head of a bird facing right, striding right, with an elongated body, her arms raised in a threatening posture, a seated dog to lower right in profile with comb above; a piglet in profile to lower left with spindle above; an uncertain ‘sideways-T’ symbol at top left corner and donkey’s ankle to top right; a line of cuneiform text, which translates to “Incantation.” The reverse has seven lines of cuneiform text that translates as: “Incantation, O Lamashtu, daughter of Anu, thou art great among the gods. Be conjured by the heavens and be conjured by the earth.“

In Mesopotamian mythology, Lamashtu was a female demon, monster, malevolent goddess or demigoddess who menaced women during childbirth and, if possible, kidnapped their children while they were breastfeeding. She would gnaw on their bones and suck their blood, as well as being charged with a number of other evil deeds. Lamashtu is depicted as a mythological hybrid, with a hairy body, a lioness’ head with donkey’s teeth and ears, long fingers and fingernails, and the feet of a bird with sharp talons. She is often shown standing or kneeling on a donkey, nursing a pig and a dog, and holding snakes. She thus bears some functions and resemblance to the Mesopotamian demon Lilith.

Lamashtu’s father was the Sky God Anu. Unlike many other usual demonic figures and depictions in Mesopotamian lore, Lamashtu was said to act in malevolence of her own accord, rather than at the gods’ instructions. Along with this her name was written together with the cuneiform determinative indicating deity. This means she was a goddess or a demigoddess in her own right. She bore seven names and was described as seven witches in incantations. Her evil deeds included: slaying children; causing harm to mothers and expectant mothers; eating men and drinking their blood; disturbing sleep; bringing nightmares; destroying crops; infesting rivers and lakes; and being a bringer of disease, sickness, and death.

Pazuzu, a god or demon, was invoked to protect birthing mothers and infants against Lamashtu’s malevolence, usually on amulets, such as this one, and statues. Although Pazuzu was said to be bringer of famine and drought, he was also invoked against evil for protection, and against plague, but he was primarily and popularly invoked against his fierce, malicious rival Lamashtu.

anonymous asked:

hello! i've been trying to research magic, but unfortunately most books i find are specific wicca, which i'm not interested in. do you have any book reccomendations that arent wicca centric? thank you! i love your blog :^)

Oh heckin yes I do My amazon wishlist is literally like six pages long… ALL BOOKS

WARNING: This Is Going To Be Extremely Long!

First though I want to note that while I 100% understand your feelings about the Wicca stuff (being a very NOT Wiccan Witch), not all books that are Wicca leaning are bad! I’ve gotten loads of useful information from books that tended to be a little new agey. That’s where being objective comes in! With ANY book, you should take it with a grain of salt, and some with a whole shaker. But it’s up to you to pay attention to misinformation and conflation, and to know how to do research to prove or disprove that something in a book you read is true or not. Does that make sense?? 

Anywho, a couple of books that are still kind of “Wicca-y” but great:

Those are all books from my personal collection that I would recommend! Now as for the Non-Wicca Books, Let’s dive in! Not all of these have I read or owned, and they are in no particular order. You’ll notice most of them relate to “Traditional Witchcraft” or West Country, because that is where my practice is focused. 

PHEW!

That was a lot! Okay anon I hope this gives you a good starting place! 

constantly-disheveled.tumblr.com/ask

The Importance of Iron in Witchcraft

So, I got a lot of really positive feedback about my post about salt in witchcraft, so here’s another one just for you about iron!

Iron, like salt, has been used for many thousands of years as a potent tool in the practices of witchcraft. Iron is one of the most abundant metals in our planet, and is also a really great metal for making into tools. It’s tough, hard, ductile and with a high melting point that makes it ideal for situations in which you might need a tool to work under extremely hot conditions. It’s also one of only three ferromagnetic metals (along with nickel and cobalt), making it an essential part of most magnets and compasses.

In astrophysics, iron is extremely important in the life cycle of stars. Iron is one of the most atomically stable substances in the universe, and it’s also unique because it’s the first element in the periodic table to require more energy to MAKE it than it gives out from atomic fusion. This is important, because when a star gets older and fuses hydrogen to make helium, helium to make beryllium and all the rest, once it starts fusing atoms to make iron, the star begins to die. So, iron is an element that signals the death of stars, and any element that weighs MORE than iron (atomically speaking) can only be made in supernovas - that is, the explosion that takes place when a really BIG star dies.

In biology, iron is one of the most important elements in mammalian, reptilian and avian blood, because it’s the element that we use in the chemical haemoglobin. This is the chemical in our blood cells that binds to oxygen and keeps us alive. Crustaceans like lobsters don’t use iron - they use copper, and instead make haemocyanin, which makes their blood blue! However, just like in stars, iron can mean death for humans as well. If we overdose on iron, we suffer from iron heavy metal poisoning; when we get crushed by a heavy object we can suffer a disease called traumatic rhabdomyolysis or Crush Syndrome, caused by vast amounts of myoglobin (another iron-based compound, found in muscles, which gives them extra oxygen to use) entering our kidneys and killing them, and as a result killing us.

Iron in science is an element of life, death, and of many points in between. But what about its uses in witchcraft?

Witchy Facts about Iron!

  1. Iron is stable. Iron’s stability, both atomically and magickally, makes it a fantastic magickal conductor, and also means that magick doesn’t seem to affect iron very much. Enchantments on iron are never as strong as on other metals, and even the best witches will have difficulty making an enchantment or other spell anchor properly. However, this has the advantage that iron doesn’t pick up negative magick from background sources, and it’s extremely unlikely that there will be issues with ritual or altar tools made from iron. Keeping your magickal supplies inside an iron or steel box, or a box that’s been nailed together with iron nails, will prevent them from leaking out and attracting spirits that might cause harm.

  2. Iron is protective. Along with silver and a few other little bits and bobs, negative spirits and fae folk cannot touch iron lest it burn them and cause them pain. Additionally, negative magicks targetted at someone wearing an iron pendant will be attracted into the pendant and then dispelled. This makes it an ideal protective charm for everyday carry or everyday wear.

    This is why horseshoes are considered lucky
    - back in Medieval times, when protection against negative spirits and magick was much more widely practiced, poor families would often be unable to afford much iron. However, a horseshoe is made of iron, and comes with holes already cast into it, which allow you to nail one over your door easily, which keeps out harmful spirits, magick, and fae, who might seek to hurt you or your family.

  3. Iron is inconspicuous. Anyone can carry an iron nail after all, and a little piece of iron wrought and twisted into a small pendant is far from a traditional witch’s item. Those secret witches who perhaps do not live with accepting families or within an accepting community or country can find great solace in the use of iron as a protective charm.

  4. Iron is cheap. Iron nails, iron rods and iron knifes are pretty easy to get hold of and relatively quite cheap. They’re versatile and not especially likely to draw attention to you - after all, nobody’s likely to question why someone has a couple of iron nails twisted into a pendant, and if they do question it, why it’s just an artistic display! And of course, easy to replace with $5 worth of string, iron and a hammer.

  5. Iron is ancient. Iron is one of the oldest protective charms out there, right up with salt and sage. It’s been used for literally thousands of years to protect people against everything from wolves to armies to poltergeists. That’s a pretty impressive history!

  6. Iron is practical! The best cookware I’ve ever used has always been my cast iron cookware set, which makes better food than I’ve ever tasted, and it’s very easy to clean. It’s also extremely hardwearing - I wholly expect to one day be able to pass on my cast iron frying pan and wok to my grandchildren, and it was already been owned by my mother and father before me. Iron knifes are sharper and cut cleaner than almost anything except obsidian, and high-carbon steel (an alloy of iron and carbon) is the best cutting edge known in bushcrafting circles, where all the best knives are made from it

I hope this helps all you lovely witches and magick users out there!

– Juniper

Roman Magic Abraxas Amulet, 2nd-3rd Century AD

Abraxas was an Egyptian Gnostic solar deity.  Amulets and seals bearing the figure of Abraxas were common in the second century AD, and were used as recently as the thirteenth century in the seals of the Knights Templar. By medieval times, Abraxas was relegated to the ranks of demons.

The image most associated with Abraxas is that of a composite creature with the head of a rooster, the body of a man, and legs made of serpents or scorpions. He carries a whip and shield, called wisdom and power, respectively. Abraxas is occasionally depicted driving a chariot drawn by four horses, which represents the four elements.

Amulets such as these (aka Abraxas Stones) bore inscribed formulas or spells and were intended to protect the owner or serve very specific magical purposes to the owner’s benefit. This amulet is made of gold and jasper.

Master Post

I went through my blog and found some posts that I thought were useful. There’s not a lot yet, but I’ll keep my resource page updated

Witch Tips/Witchcraft 101

Spells/Potions

Divination

Herbalist Related/Etc

Kitchen Witchcraft

Hellenic Polytheism

Deities/General Polytheism

With a group I played with a while ago, we used to play a lot of one- shots when players couldn’t be there. We liked that a lot, so we could try out a lot of different characters and stuff.

Once we got a magic amulet that we needed for a quest, but it appeared to be broken.

BARBARIAN GUY: Wait, hold up. I got a spell for this.

EVERYONE AT THE TABLE: …

BARBARIAN GUY: *takes the amulet* … mending!

DM: And all the people nearby look at the barbarian, astonished, as he stares at and cluthes tightly to the amulet while chanting ‘mending’, and nothing happens- it’s almost as if he thinks he’s some kind of Priest Gnome or something.

BARBARIAN GUY: *facepalms*

Herbal Amulets

From Magical Herbalism by Scott Cunningham

  • To See Ghosts: Carry lavender and inhale its scent.
  • To allay fears: Carry a mixture of nettle and yarrow.
  • To Detect Witches: Carry a sachet of Rue, maidenhair, agrimony, broom-straw, and ground ivy.
  • To Be Courageous: Wear a fresh borage flower, or carry mullein.
  • To Avoid Military Service: Wear the 4-leaved clover if you wish to avoid duty.
  • To Ensure Safety and Protection on A Journey: Comfrey worn or carried will safeguard you.
  • To Prevent Storms and Wreckage While At Sea: Put a clove of garlic in your purse or in your pocket. In the South Pacific or in Hawaii wear a garland of ti leaves.
  • To Guard against Rape: Wear the heather to avoid all acts of passion.
  • To Keep One from Dreaming: Hang a sprig of lemon verbena around the neck.
  • To Conceive: Wear the mistletoe, the cyclamen, or the bistort.
  • To Prevent Weariness while Walking: Put mugwort in the shoe.
  • To Keep Venomous Beasts and Wild Animals Afar: Wear avens or mullien.
  • To Keep Others from Deceiving You: Wear the pimpernel or snapdragon.
  • To Keep Disease Afar: Wear a sprig of rue around the neck.
  • To Enable A Soldier To Escape His Enemies: Wear the vervain and you shall accomplish this.
  • To Avoid Being Sent To The Gallows: Wear or carry a carnation.
  • To Ensure Victory: Wear woodruff to win.
  • To Ensure That Friendly Words Are Spoken To You: Wear the heliotrope.
  • To Enter the Underworld: Carry an apple, or the branch of an apple tree that bears buds, flowers, and fully ripened fruit.
  • To Regain Lost Manhood: Carry an acorn or mandrake root.
  • To Remain Youthful: Carry an acorn.
  • To Prevent Drunkenness: Wear a chaplet of saffron, crocus, parsley, or rue to prolong your enjoyment.
  • To See Fairies: Gather wild thyme and carry it with you, or put it on the eyelids (with your eyes closed) and sleep on a fairy hill.
  • To Be A Successful Fisherman: Carry a bit of the hawthorn.
  • To See A Unicorn: As this beast usually lives among the ash trees, carry a bit of the wood or leaves and you may see one. Or lie down among ashes and place one of its leaves on your chest and wait for one to make itself known.
Protection Amulet

This amulet is a bundle to be carried with you, so be sure to use a small stone. Create this amulet during a waxing or full moon phase. 

Stones:

One of the following, depending on your specific need:

  • Clear Quartz: all-purpose
  • Tiger Eye: courage
  • Black Tourmaline or Obsidian: repelling unwanted energy
  • Garnet: guards against thieves (good to keep in a vehicle)
  • Turquoise: protection during a spiritual jouney
  • Moonstone: protection during travel

Other Items:

  • Incense (frankincense if possible)
  • A candle of any size, white or red
  • A piece of red or white cloth for wrapping the stone (or a draw string bag)
  • String, ribbon, or twine

Create sacred space as desired. Light the incense and the candle. Pass the stone through the incense smoke and chant:

Rising smoke, clear this sone.

Next (holding the stone safely in tongs, if you wish), charge it by passing it quickly through the candle flame and chant:

Rising flame, charge this stone. 

Hold the stone in your projective hand and wrap your fingers around it. Focus your intent on your specific need. Speak it out loud if you’d like. Chant five times:

Stone as guard, danger barred:

To protect, none detect.

Wrap the fabric around the stone and tie it in a knot with the ribbon or string. Allow the wrapped stone to rest near the candle until it burns out. Allow the incense to burn out as well.

Carry the amulet with you in your pocket, handbag, briefcase, backpack, etc., for as long as you feel the need. Recharge the amulet as you feel is necessary.

(Source: The Book of Crystal Spells by Ember Grant)  

4

Guardian eye.

I finished him and he hangs beautifully on my wall. I love the way it moves when a breeze moves through my room.

He looks on and protects me. Filled with herbs and seeds, sewn with magically charged thread and specific intent, finally life breathed into the cloth and hung in a place of honor.

Hemp string, cloth, embroidery thread, obsidian, and a creosote branch (smells like rain )

anonymous asked:

hello! i have a question that i've always been curious about but have never actually found and answer for. do you happen to know where the kabbalah bracelet concept came from? i've seen some people argue it comes from ancient texts and others say teenagers appropriated it from hinduism in the sixties. is there any concrete answer or is it just one of those things we don't know for sure?

Great question! I’m assuming you’re referring to the ‘red thread’ bracelet often sold as a ‘Kabbalistic’ accessory, and famously worn by Madonna.

There’s actually an excellent English academic study on this topic! Essentially, both the colour red and the act of tying a string are long-established customs of folk magic around the world… Scarlet threads appear a number of places in the Torah (e.g. tied to the wrist of Tamar’s son Zerah, and hung from Rahav’s window), where Elly Teman argues that “it is connected to situations of birthright, bloodshed, sacrifice, atonement, redemption, and protection, and it appears in situations where boundaries must be asserted between sacred and profane, forsaken and redeemed, those destined to live and those destined to die, those who belong to the Israelite nation and those who do not.” But nowhere in the Hebrew Bible does wearing a red thread appear as a practice, either for protection or for blessing.

The earliest reference I can find to the specific tradition of wearing a red thread as a Jewish magical practice is in the Tosefta, a collection of midrashim from the time of the Talmud, which lists “tying a ribbon to one’s thigh, or a red thread to one’s finger” as practices considered as pagan idolatry, “darkhei Emori” (T. Shabbat 7.1). Several commentators over subsequent centuries reference this passage — the 16th-century Qabbalist Eliyahu de Vidas, for example, quotes it in his book Reshit Hokhma (and thus seemingly registers his agreement that this practice is forbidden). So while on the one hand, rabbinic prohibitions usually are indications of popular practices, it doesn’t seem to have gained much traction in Qabbalistic circles.

It occasionally appears in traditional 19th- and 20th-century descriptions of amulets for childbirth or to protect newborns (an amusing example is that the Hassidic rabbi Yehudah Yudl Rosenberg mentions it in his 1907 book of segulot and amulets, noting that the Tosefta forbids it, but this is in a list of recommended amulets for children, so it’s a wink-wink sort of situation)… In a Hebrew article on the red thread, R. Levi Freund records a few late 19th- and early 20th-century Hassidic rabbis who approved of or practiced the custom for children in their communities, and I found a few other examples from the early 20th century that reference the use of red thread specifically from Rachel’s Tomb (outside Bethlehem) for protection during childbirth or for a newborn (e.g. the testimony of Sister Selma Mayer here, and Teman’s article also cites a few from the 1930s).

But it seems that wearing a red thread generally was not a common practice, whether in or out of Qabbalistic circles. As Teman demonstrates, it seems to have taken off in post-1967 Israel for a variety of socio-political reasons — this is when it began appearing in Jerusalem (at the Western Wall specifically) and became a general symbol of protection, rather than associated with fertility. From there it spread to Jewish communities in North America and elsewhere, and got picked up by the faux-‘Kabbalah’-peddling folks of Madonna et al.

tl;dr: the red thread is a Jewish folk practice, shared with other world cultures, that began in late antiquity, and was traditionally associated in Jewish magic with fertility and protection of children, but became popular in Israel over the last 50 years as a symbol of blessing. It has no association with Qabbala in the classical sense, nor can it be claimed to have been appropriated from Hinduism.

Hope that helps!