magic globe

magical communities across the globe

i love harry potter (as do we all) and like most im incredibly disappointed with the lack of multiculturalism in it and i havent been able to stop thinking about how wizarding communities in different cultures might evolve. some cultures are much more in touch with spirituality and magic, so the wizarding community doesnt have to be as repressed everywhere as it is in england. so… think about it?

  • spell casting in different languages!! tonal languages like chinese. if i know anything from 5 years learning mandarin its that intonation can change your meaning completely… a transfer student attending the beijing wizarding school. theyre doing charms and accidentally get the tones wrong. the only thing you hear is their chinese classmates yelling “nO NO NONONO-” before they all get turned into frogs
  • big wizarding families with ancient lineage having had generations living in hidden hutongs across chinese cities!
  • what about all those stories of old emperors sending envoys out to search for the key to immortality - and this brings up the interesting possibilities of intersections between magic and traditional medicine!
  • you know how bats are a symbol of good luck in china? and black cats are symbols of good luck in japan? yeah
  • also screw the gross western conflation of blackness with evil, with corruption. screw the death eaters with their “dark marks”. many cultures see white as death, as emptiness, and black as richness, as life. wizarding communities finding power in the darkness of the night
  • what about indian wizards and witches? theyre big on scientific magic (unlike the incredibly scientifically backward communities in england) bc for centuries india and the middle east had the greatest scientific developments in the world
  • indian wizards/witches making breakthroughs in astronomy through their charmed instruments and maps that rotate with their view of the skies!
  • hindu wizards using mehndi to form magical symbols on their skin
  • and what about tattoos and piercings across cultures! so many communities across africa and south america and the pacific that have long histories with tattoos. imagine tattoos glowing while they spellcast. 
  • young witches and wizards earning tattoos as they grow… the tattoos grow organically and shift and change
  • and its incredible bc all different cultures would have completely different approaches to spellcasting at all!! what if wizards across the world dont generally use wands? some use staffs or their bare hands or scrolls or even their eyes!
  • inuit magical communities!! conjuring fire for warmth. keeping seals and wolves as familiars. using ice and water in their magic and hunting in the icy waters by transforming into animagi 
  • wizards and witches in the amazon who are hidden from the rest of the world. they use plants to their advantage by merging into foliage or slipping into shadows, leaving no trace behind at all. they nurse their ecosystems back to life
  • east asian wizards using martial arts to strengthen their magical abilities or to duel
  • and what about the possibilities in art across different cultures!! old japanese woodblock prints that oscillate and move around. wall carvings in hindu temples dancing and walking around
  • kashmiri and pakistani wizards with eye colours that subtly shift and change depending on what magic theyre performing
  • hieroglyphics in ancient egyptian wizarding communities!! they often have cat familiars too 
  • nomadic communities living in scorching deserts… wearing shimmering fabrics, almost appearing to be mirages themselves bc they can bend and twist light
  • viking wizards exploring the world on ships!! powered by wind they harness themselves by performing incredibly powerful coordinated spells. especially strong norse wizards could harness lightning
  • maori magical communities and southeast asian communities and pacific islanders taking care of reefs. they can manipulate air and water to travel deep below the surface of the ocean
  • magical communities atop the himalayas in monasteries. they protect muggle climbers from avalanches and heal climbers who have been wounded
  • wizards/witches in the swiss alps who are animagi. they transform into saint bernards and form strong bonds with explorers

im just in love with wizarding communities across the globe evolving separately and having different relationships to spirituality because!! nothing is ever black and white but the world is vast and diverse and there are ten thousand sights that could blow you away and how tiring that the only glimpse into wizarding communities we receive is the drab and repressed one in the UK

brainwad  asked:

I'm roughly halfway thru Once Broken Faith (& LOVING it). Not only am I so happy to see my faerie friends again, I also can't help but imagine a fae CSPAN broadcasting the conclave proceedings to magic mirrors across the globe.

“Well, Diane, it looks like October–”

“This would be October Daye, first changeling to be knighted in the Kingdom in the Mists in over a hundred years, daughter of Amandine and an unidentified mortal man.”

“Exactly so.  October appears to be, ah, insulting another monarch.”

“You know, Charles, sometimes I think this girl wants to be a ficus tree.”

“Pretty sure you’re right, Diane.  Pretty sure you’re right.”

As a traveler you are always leaving one magical place you hold close to your heart to venture off into the unknown again, to find a new magical place to conquer
—  Iggy

Roman Luna on a Globe Statuette, 2nd-3rd Century AD

Luna was the personification of the moon, equivalent to Greek Selene, often shown as an aspect of the Roman triple goddess (diva triformis), along with Proserpina and Hecate. Her billowing robes represent the endless forward motion of the goddess in her celestial chariot, while the silver detailing of the figure evokes moonlight.  Her chief temple was on the Aventine Hill in Rome.

Her Greek name means “light’ or radiance” and she was the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia, and sister to Helios, the sun god, and Eos, goddess of the dawn. Several lovers are attributed to her in various myths, including Zeus, Pan, and the mortal Endymion. In classical times, Selene was often identified with Artemis, much as her brother, Helios, was identified with Apollo. The poet Aeschylus calls Selene “the eye of the night” and other ancient literary references describe her the “bright and beautiful haired.” The Orphic Hymns give Selene horns and a torch, describing her as “all-seeing”, “all-wise”, a lover of horses and of vigilance, and a “foe of strife” who “gives to Nature’s works their destined end”. Paired with her brother Helios, Selene adorned the east pediment of the Parthenon, where the two framed a scene depicting the birth of Athena, with Helios driving his chariot rising from the ocean on the left, and Selene and her chariot descending into the sea on the right.

From Pausanias, we learn that Selene and Helios also framed the birth of Aphrodite on the base of the Statue of Zeus at Olympia. There are indications of a similar framing by Selene and Helios of the birth of Pandora on the base of the Athena Parthenos. Selene also appears on horseback as part of the Gigantomachy frieze of the Pergamon Altar. Due to her association with the moon she was the tutelary deity of magicians and sorcerers.