made at school and about school

In high school, I worked on the daily morning show for my video production class for about 3 years. My favorite video I ever made was a garbage dancing compilation I made where I went around the school for like a week and got students and teachers to dance. And to separate each public domain song, I used a clip of a teacher everyone didn’t like laughing. It was amazing.

anonymous asked:

Hcs for being Jake's (bmc) best friend? Like 100 percent platonic please

-You guys had always been in school together, but started getting close in fourth grade Reading Olympics (he actually kinda liked to read fiction, he can just never find free time to read. This was an excuse to have another extracurricular and read)

-He’d show up to the library, and you were usually there anyway, so you’d help him find stuff and talk about/ quiz him on the books he’d read

-He started to come up to you in school, or ask if he could bike to your house after student council because he needed help with social studies

-Fast forward to high school- everyone always thought you were a couple, or would make a great one, but the idea made you both roll your eyes; he had his conquests, you had yours, and you two were the best wingmen for each other.

-As Jake joined more activities and became more popular,  you had to learn to share your best friend. Even so, he’d always meet you Tuesday nights at Sbarro for garlic knots. No exceptions. 

-He loves to give you piggyback rides

-Your parents love him, and vice versa. You’ve had sleepovers at both houses, and they don’t even bat an eye anymore.

-He doesn’t mind watching chick flicks or whatever, as long as there are food and his best bud involved

-You guys have been each others’ best friends on snap since y’all downloaded the app

-You go to each of his games/matches/debates/whatever he may have for school this time

-You guys win superlative for “Most Likely to Be Best Friends Forever” when you graduate

2

Went and saw the Lego Batman movie tonight and it was so good. It was so good you guys it was so GOOD

  • Ravenclaw: Being late is my aesthetic.
  • Slytherin: But you're not late for anything right now.
  • Ravenclaw: Not yet.
  • Slytherin: Okay, whatever, it's your aesthetic, I guess.
2

Sehun blowing you kisses to wish you a good day ahead  (´。• ω •。`) ♡

Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully - in Ten Minutes

by Stephen King
(reprinted in Sylvia K. Burack, ed. The Writer’s Handbook. Boston, MA: Writer, Inc., 1988: 3-9)

I. The First Introduction

THAT’S RIGHT. I know it sounds like an ad for some sleazy writers’ school, but I really am going to tell you everything you need to pursue a successful and financially rewarding career writing fiction, and I really am going to do it in ten minutes, which is exactly how long it took me to learn.  It will actually take you twenty minutes or so to read this essay, however, because I have to tell you a story, and then I have to write a second introduction.  But these, I argue, should not count in the ten minutes.



II. The Story, or, How Stephen King Learned to Write

When I was a sophomore in high school, I did a sophomoric thing which got me in a pot of fairly hot water, as sophomoric didoes often do.  I wrote and published a small satiric newspaper called The Village Vomit.  In this little paper I lampooned a number of teachers at Lisbon (Maine) High School, where I was under instruction.  These were not very gentle lampoons; they ranged from the scatological to the downright cruel

Eventually, a copy of this little newspaper found its way into the hands of a faculty member, and since I had been unwise enough to put my name on it (a fault, some critics argue, of which I have still not been entirely cured), I was brought into the office. The sophisticated satirist had by that time reverted to what he really was: a fourteen-year-old kid who was shaking in his boots and wondering if he was going to get a suspension … what we called “a three-day vacation” in those dim days of 1964.

I wasn’t suspended. I was forced to make a number of apologies - they were warranted, but they still tasted like dog-dirt in my mouth - and spent a week in detention hall. And the guidance counselor arranged what he no doubt thought of as a more constructive channel for my talents. This was a job - contingent upon the editor’s approval - writing sports for the Lisbon Enterprise, a twelve-page weekly of the sort with which any small-town resident will be familiar. This editor was the man who taught me everything I know about writing in ten minutes. His name was John Gould - not the famed New England humorist or the novelist who wrote The Greenleaf Fires, but a relative of both, I believe.

He told me he needed a sports writer and we could “try each other out” if I wanted.

I told him I knew more about advanced algebra than I did sports.

Gould nodded and said, “You’ll learn.”

I said I would at least try to learn. Gould gave me a huge roll of yellow paper and promised me a wage of 1/2¢ per word. The first two pieces I wrote had to do with a high school basketball game in which a member of my school team broke the Lisbon High scoring record. One of these pieces was straight reportage. The second was a feature article.

I brought them to Gould the day after the game, so he’d have them for the paper, which came out Fridays. He read the straight piece, made two minor corrections, and spiked it. Then he started in on the feature piece with a large black pen and taught me all I ever needed to know about my craft. I wish I still had the piece - it deserves to be framed, editorial corrections and all - but I can remember pretty well how it looked when he had finished with it. Here’s an example:

(note: this is before the edit marks indicated on King’s original copy)

Last night, in the well-loved gymnasium of Lisbon High School, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom, known as “Bullet” Bob for both his size and accuracy, scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his knight-like quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon thinclads since 1953….

(after edit marks)

Last night, in the Lisbon High School gymnasium, partisans and Jay Hills fans alike were stunned by an athletic performance unequaled in school history: Bob Ransom scored thirty-seven points. He did it with grace and speed … and he did it with an odd courtesy as well, committing only two personal fouls in his quest for a record which has eluded Lisbon’s basketball team since 1953….

When Gould finished marking up my copy in the manner I have indicated above, he looked up and must have seen something on my face. I think he must have thought it was horror, but it was not: it was revelation.

“I only took out the bad parts, you know,” he said. “Most of it’s pretty good.”

“I know,” I said, meaning both things: yes, most of it was good, and yes, he had only taken out the bad parts. “I won’t do it again.”

“If that’s true,” he said, “you’ll never have to work again. You can do this for a living.” Then he threw back his head and laughed.

And he was right; I am doing this for a living, and as long as I can keep on, I don’t expect ever to have to work again.



III. The Second Introduction

All of what follows has been said before. If you are interested enough in writing to be a purchaser of this magazine, you will have either heard or read all (or almost all) of it before. Thousands of writing courses are taught across the United States each year; seminars are convened; guest lecturers talk, then answer questions, then drink as many gin and tonics as their expense-fees will allow, and it all boils down to what follows.

I am going to tell you these things again because often people will only listen - really listen - to someone who makes a lot of money doing the thing he’s talking about. This is sad but true. And I told you the story above not to make myself sound like a character out of a Horatio Alger novel but to make a point: I saw, I listened, and I learned. Until that day in John Gould’s little office, I had been writing first drafts of stories which might run 2,500 words. The second drafts were apt to run 3,300 words. Following that day, my 2,500-word first drafts became 2,200-word second drafts. And two years after that, I sold the first one.

So here it is, with all the bark stripped off. It’ll take ten minutes to read, and you can apply it right away…if you listen.



IV. Everything You Need to Know About Writing Successfully

1.  BE TALENTED
This, of course, is the killer.  What is talent?  I can hear someone shouting, and here we are, ready to get into a discussion right up there with “what is the meaning of life?” for weighty pronouncements and total uselessness.  For the purposes of the beginning writer, talent may as well be defined as eventual success - publication and money.  If you wrote something for which someone sent you a check, if you cashed the check and it didn’t bounce, and if you then paid the light bill with the money, I consider you talented.

Now some of you are really hollering.  Some of you are calling me one crass money-fixated creep.  And some of you are calling me bad names.  Are you calling Harold Robbins talented?  someone in one of the Great English Departments of America is screeching.  V.C. Andrews?  Theodore Dreiser?  Or what about you, you dyslexic moron?

Nonsense.  Worse than nonsense, off the subject.  We’re not talking about good or bad here.  I’m interested in telling you how to get your stuff published, not in critical judgments of who’s good or bad.  As a rule the critical judgments come after the check’s been spent, anyway.  I have my own opinions, but most times I keep them to myself.  People who are published steadily and are paid for what they are writing may be either saints or trollops, but they are clearly reaching a great many someones who want what they have.  Ergo, they are communicating.  Ergo, they are talented.  The biggest part of writing successfully is being talented, and in the context of marketing, the only bad writer is one who doesn’t get paid.  If you’re not talented, you won’t succeed.  And if you’re not succeeding, you should know when to quit.

When is that?  I don’t know.  It’s different for each writer.  Not after six rejection slips, certainly, nor after sixty.  But after six hundred?  Maybe.  After six thousand?  My friend, after six thousand pinks, it’s time you tried painting or computer programming.

Further, almost every aspiring writer knows when he is getting warmer - you start getting little jotted notes on your rejection slips, or personal letters…maybe a commiserating phone call.  It’s lonely out there in the cold, but there are encouraging voices…unless there is nothing in your words which warrants encouragement.  I think you owe it to yourself to skip as much of the self-illusion as possible.  If your eyes are open, you’ll know which way to go…or when to turn back.

2.  BE NEAT
Type.  Double-space.  Use a nice heavy white paper, never that erasable onion-skin stuff.  If you’ve marked up your manuscript a lot, do another draft.

3.  BE SELF-CRITICAL
If you haven’t marked up your manuscript a lot, you did a lazy job.  Only God gets things right the first time.  Don’t be a slob.

4.  REMOVE EVERY EXTRANEOUS WORD
You want to get up on a soapbox and preach?  Fine.  Get one and try your local park.  You want to write for money?  Get to the point.  And if you remove all the excess garbage and discover you can’t find the point, tear up what you wrote and start all over again…or try something new.

5.  NEVER LOOK AT A REFERENCE BOOK WHILE DOING A FIRST DRAFT You want to write a story?  Fine.  Put away your dictionary, your encyclopedias, your World Almanac, and your thesaurus.  Better yet, throw your thesaurus into the wastebasket.  The only things creepier than a thesaurus are those little paperbacks college students too lazy to read the assigned novels buy around exam time.  Any word you have to hunt for in a thesaurus is the wrong word.  There are no exceptions to this rule.  You think you might have misspelled a word?  O.K., so here is your choice: either look it up in the dictionary, thereby making sure you have it right - and breaking your train of thought and the writer’s trance in the bargain - or just spell it phonetically and correct it later.  Why not?  Did you think it was going to go somewhere?  And if you need to know the largest city in Brazil and you find you don’t have it in your head, why not write in Miami, or Cleveland?  You can check it…but laterWhen you sit down to write, write.  Don’t do anything else except go to the bathroom, and only do that if it absolutely cannot be put off.

6.  KNOW THE MARKETS
Only a dimwit would send a story about giant vampire bats surrounding a high school to McCall’s.  Only a dimwit would send a tender story about a mother and daughter making up their differences on Christmas Eve to Playboy…but people do it all the time.  I’m not exaggerating; I have seen such stories in the slush piles of the actual magazines.  If you write a good story, why send it out in an ignorant fashion?  Would you send your kid out in a snowstorm dressed in Bermuda shorts and a tank top?  If you like science fiction, read the magazines.  If you want to write confession stories, read the magazines.  And so on.  It isn’t just a matter of knowing what’s right for the present story; you can begin to catch on, after awhile, to overall rhythms, editorial likes and dislikes, a magazine’s entire slant.  Sometimes your reading can influence the next story, and create a sale.

7.  WRITE TO ENTERTAIN
Does this mean you can’t write “serious fiction”?  It does not.  Somewhere along the line pernicious critics have invested the American reading and writing public with the idea that entertaining fiction and serious ideas do not overlap.  This would have surprised Charles Dickens, not to mention Jane Austen, John Steinbeck, William Faulkner, Bernard Malamud, and hundreds of others.  But your serious ideas must always serve your story, not the other way around.  I repeat: if you want to preach, get a soapbox.

8.  ASK YOURSELF FREQUENTLY, AM I HAVING FUN?”
The answer needn’t always be yes.  But if it’s always no, it’s time for a new project or a new career.

9.  HOW TO EVALUATE CRITICISM
Show your piece to a number of people - ten, let us say.  Listen carefully to what they tell you.  Smile and nod a lot.  Then review what was said very carefully.  If your critics are all telling you the same thing about some facet of your story - a plot twist that doesn’t work, a character who rings false, stilted narrative, or half a dozen other possibles - change that facet.  It doesn’t matter if you really liked that twist of that character; if a lot of people are telling you something is wrong with you piece, it is.  If seven or eight of them are hitting on that same thing, I’d still suggest changing it.  But if everyone - or even most everyone - is criticizing something different, you can safely disregard what all of them say.

10.  OBSERVE ALL RULES FOR PROPER SUBMISSION
Return postage, self-addressed envelope, all of that.

11.  AN AGENT?  FORGET IT.  FOR NOW
Agents get 10% of monies earned by their clients.  10% of nothing is nothing.  Agents also have to pay the rent.  Beginning writers do not contribute to that or any other necessity of life.  Flog your stories around yourself.  If you’ve done a novel, send around query letters to publishers, one by one, and follow up with sample chapters and/or the manuscript complete.  And remember Stephen King’s First Rule of Writers and Agents, learned by bitter personal experience: You don’t need one until you’re making enough for someone to steal…and if you’re making that much, you’ll be able to take your pick of good agents.

12.  IF IT’S BAD, KILL IT
When it comes to people, mercy killing is against the law.  When it comes to fiction, it is the law.



That’s everything you need to know.  And if you listened, you can write everything and anything you want.  Now I believe I will wish you a pleasant day and sign off.

My ten minutes are up.

Ravenclaw Headcanon

Ravenclaws know where all the trick stairs are, they automatically skip them. But if they start to think about where the trick stairs are, Ravenclaws will step into every single one of them.

Got asked to "step down" from a position.

Years ago, I taught Sunday school on a voluntary basis at a megachurch in my town. There were so many children in this church that classrooms were made available to group children with Sunday school teachers for every year of their life until middle school and high school, at which point they attended a larger group with similarly aged peers in separate wings of the building. I taught two-year-olds, and loved every moment of it.

My classroom boasted a huge number of children, at about 20-25 per service. I was supposed to have an adult co-teacher, but all the other adult volunteers were sent to other classrooms with a “higher need”. I had two high-school-aged volunteers, best friends, who often spent service time playing together, despite repeated approaches to asking them to play with the children (one of my volunteers was the director’s son, who I couldn’t replace because of his mother, and who clearly did not want to be volunteering).

Despite this, and despite inheriting a huge classroom full of several special needs children, my children played calmly throughout service, and enjoyed a routine and simple rules I set to run the classroom efficiently. Children arrived, played calmly, sang songs, ate snack, and went home.

Even in the face of this obvious evidence that my classroom was running efficiently, I was repeatedly asked by church leaders to adopt certain mannerisms around children I found inauthentic and frankly patronizing. I don’t and won’t speak in a high-pitched voice to anyone, child or adult. I don’t and won’t use words like “upsie daisy”. These requests were persistent. It was the opinion of the church that I was not “warm and welcoming” enough. It was modeled again and again that the church would prefer I was overanimated in a HUGE SMILE HUG “I’M SO GLAD YOU’RE HERE” kind of greeting.

One summer day we were all called (some 50+ room leaders and volunteers) into a mandatory meeting. You know those meetings where you instantly know they’re talking about you? The policies on words like “upsie daisy” were now set in writing, and I was shortly asked to step down for not using these phrases. I was not allowed to prepare my children for the transition to a new Sunday teacher. I was immediately replaced (by a friend, actually) and was fairly crushed about the sudden break from little people I liked spending time with. And furthermore, it made me question my abilities to work with children, an endeavor I had already devoted my life to.

Unbeknownst to my church, I had long been working at a career in early childhood intervention, teaching a classroom full of two-year-old child victims of trauma and abuse with a heavy case load of special needs children. My coworker called me over one Monday, as I was the twos teacher, asking what I made of this email she had just received concerning a church with an out-of-control twos room requesting that someone come consult with their new staff and help implement some new classroom techniques to “manage difficult behaviors”.

Naturally, I agreed to do the consult in person as soon as possible, and asked my coworker to let them know I would meet with them on a completely voluntary basis at their next Sunday service.

It was absolutely my pleasure to greet my church leaders and friend as their specialist consultant, to their confused surprise.

I walked them through all sorts of interventions and strategies I had previously used to create a calm classroom environment and strongly advised against the use of overly excited greetings and phrases like “upsie daisy” in place of direct redirective requests (e.g. “Please put your feet back on the floor.”) It was my strong written recommendation that the written policies on these strategies be amended and for staff to be immediately retrained in accordance with actual therapeutic practices.

It was my last time stepping foot in that church, and will forever remain my most deliciously cherished memories of vindication.

8

ChaBin

↳ “Whatever hyung’s decision is, I will follow you. Even if I think it’s wrong I will always follow you.”

In addition to my high school au, PROM NIGHT!!

Short fic under cut!

Keep reading

i was really iffy about max when she was introduced but now i love her

Shout out to the dumb boys who yanked my scarf off in the hallways and then laughed when I dropped all my books. Shout out to the guy who thought it was funny to go behind me during class and pull my bra strap to hear it snap then got defensive when I brought my fist out. Shout out to the guys who would say ‘that shit around your head is ugly you think you’re pretty?’ ‘let’s get married so I can see ur hair’ shout out to you because I love wearing hijab 100000x more because of you jerks

2

ready to go - panic! at the disco

An annotated compilation of some of my favorite love songs

listen here  )

Be My Forever – Christina Perri (feat. Ed Sheeran)

“We’re on top of the world now darling so don’t let go…”

This song is one of my favorites by Christina Perri. It’s fun, quirky, and most importantly it features Ed Sheeran (plus Taylor Swift’s laugh towards the end) It’s the ultimate story about a couple who sees themselves being together forever. My favorite lyric is “You’re my bright blue sky // You’re the sun in my eyes // Oh baby you’re my life // You’re the reason why” because it describes that feeling of true love and how magical it can be.

Give Me Love – Ed Sheeran

This song is basically 8 minutes and 46 seconds of pure magic. When I first came across this song I couldn’t believe such a thing existed. It may not be as uplifting as the previous song, but I feel that its story of hopeful romance is really heartwarming and Ed’s way of turning lyrics into something so powerful really puts me in his position of needing love. It is incredible to see how he can take simple phrases and reword them into something so thrilling. When he says, “paint splattered teardrops on my shirt” instead of simply saying he is crying is just crazy to me. This song is one of my favorites by Ed and it is my go-to song whenever I need to calm down.

Fearless – Taylor Swift

“In this moment now // Capture it, remember it”

Throwing it back to Taylor’s country days, this song is a love story about being fearless and not knowing why. “And I don’t know why, but with you I’d dance. In a storm, in my best dress. Fearless” This song is about when you just can’t help how you feel about someone, and you’re nervous and scared, but also excited. It’s cute and really captures the story of someone who just can’t control how they feel. It’s totally a classic T-Swift love song.

From the Ground Up – Dan + Shay

This song is the definition of true love. It’s the story of Dan and Shay’s grandparents, and how they built their love step by step and grew old together. The song starts with, “Grandma and grandpa painted a picture of sixty-five years // And one little house // More than a memory // More than saying I do // Kiss you goodnight’s and I love you’s.” These few opening lines are so powerful because it shows how much love means to them and how their love is not just “saying I Do” at their wedding, but it’s all of the work and effort they put into it. This song is different from other Dan + Shay songs, because most of their songs are the type I would roll down the windows to in the middle on the night during the Summer, but this song is beautiful and meaningful.

Perfect – One Direction

Okay yes, judge me all you want, but I love this song for multiple reasons. 1) It is totally about Taylor Swift and 2) It is actually a really cute story. It’s basically a song about not being the typical “Mr. Perfect”, but being perfect in his own way. It lists off things that aren’t ideal for a boyfriend. “I might never be your knight in shining armour // I might never be the one you take home to mother // And I might never be the one who brings you flowers.” But then it continues into the reasons why he is perfect for this specific girl. “If you like causing trouble up in hotel rooms // And if you like having secret little rendezvous // If you like to do the things you know that we shouldn’t do //Then baby, I’m perfect // Baby, I’m perfect for you.” It’s funny and cute and really gives the listener a sense of the crazy relationship that Harry Styles and Taylor Swift shared.

How Would You Feel – Ed Sheeran

This song literally just came out tonight, and after the first time I heard it I automatically fell in love with it. I love how Ed starts by saying, “You are the one girl, you know that it’s true.” This song is so beautiful and I really love how Ed’s music has evolved into music about pure love, rather than the heartbreak he used to sing about. I love how he says, “Love flows deeper than a river, every moment that I spend with you.” It’s exciting to see his music grow and this song only makes me more excited for his album coming out in March.

All of the songs in this collection share one main similarity in the theme -  Love. They are all different in genre and sound, but they all share the same focus of falling in love, finding a soulmate, or being totally wrong and right for a person at the same time. Each artist brings something different to the theme, but they all leave you with one message – love is inevitable.

【Japan Official Fanclub Magazine Vol.2】BTS My Biography – Suga’s part

From a mischievous child to a young boy that loves to read

Born in Daegu, South Korea’s 3rd biggest city, which is located in the south. I lived there until I came to Seoul. I was just an ordinary child, I always liked to mess around. So, the teacher in nursery didn’t really like me (laughs). I remember that I always got told off “it’s dangerous!” I liked sports and I was especially good at running. From primary school to high school, I often got chosen to participate in the relay race. And I was above average in studying.

When I was a child, I really liked to go out to play with my friends. But as I grew up, I wasn’t that fond of going out to play. Even when I went out to play, we just met in the park, there were nothing to do though. I didn’t like that, so I usually stayed at home along on the weekends. My mother said: “you should go out to see your friends sometimes.” (laughs)

I liked to collect, so I collected a lot of books when I was a child. Because at the time, I wanted to be cultivated, I wanted to pretend that I’m civilized. So, I read many grown up novels, poetry anthology, literary works and news articles which didn’t suit me… I read all genres of books. I don’t know why but from middle school onwards, I started to have the habit of reading from the back page. Now, I would read books sometimes. My reading speed is quick because I read chunks of writings.

First love in primary school… I honestly don’t have any memories about that. Unlike Seoul, the place I live in is quite conservative. Especially in my school, it’s rare to see boys talking to girls. Even being next to a girl made me shy, I didn’t even say a thing.

Encountered Hip-Hop
Started to compose music in middle school

I became interested in music when I was in 5th grade of middle school, I saw the Korean artist Stony Skunk’s performance on TV. At the time, the genre Ballad was in its prime. If 18 teams were on a music show, 10 would be ballad groups, 5 would be idol groups and the remaining 3 would be other genres, Stony Skunk was one of the 3. Stony Skunk was really cool, their style is so different from the other groups. I’ve never been interested in music before that, but under the influence of Stony Skunk, I started to listen to Hip-Hop and Reggae music. I was also influenced by Epik High. MP3 players were getting popular at the time but I bought a Panasonic CD player and listened to music with that.

That’s how I started to listen to music, and at the same time I started to write song as well. No one told me to do it, but I just felt like I should write something. I started to write rap lyrics in primary school and started to compose music in middle school. At the time, no one around me liked Hip-Hop. Although Hip-Hop is getting popular again in Korea but when I encountered Hip-Hop, it was a genre that was popular from a long time ago. You probably couldn’t find anyone who raps on the street, apart from me. My friends complained when I sang rap songs in the karaoke room. You know there’re those special hand gestures in Hip-Hop, I got laughed at because I did those gestures.

Despite all of that, I continued to like Hip-Hop. I got to perform on the stage for the first time in 2nd of middle school. I performed Dynamic Duo’s ‘Go Back’ with my friends. I don’t like standing in front of many people but I just felt like I had to do it. I wanted to show off the rap that I’ve been practicing, although I wasn’t that great (laughs). Actually, I wanted to attend an arts high school, so I even produced classical music. But arts high school is too expensive so I attended an ordinary high school. I said to my father, “I’ve made enough music, I’ll study properly when I’m in high school.” But I never kept my promise (laughs).

Joined an underground crew in hometown, started to work as an underground rapper

I produced music in middle school for self-satisfaction, and I made songs in a hobby level. But after I changed the MIDI equipment, I started to make music properly. When I was in 1st grade of high school, I made a person to listen to my song, he was a teacher to me and he really liked it. Then he introduced me to a Hip-Hop crew called ’D-Town’ and I joined in. That song had a New Age music feeling to it but the Hip-Hop beats were like Nujabes. For your information, the teacher that acknowledged me studied in Berklee College of Music and now he’s a music director for movies. After I joined the crew, I started to learn rap properly. Although I’ve been rapping since primary school but since no one around me raps, so I always thought I was the best (laughs).

This is how I started my underground activities in Daegu. It also made me realize that working in the underground scene is difficult to make a living. The hyungs that I worked with was 10 years older than me, there were even people over 30 years old. They had to work part-time along with making music, it looked so tiring. I really hated the fact that it was difficult to gather 100 audience when we try to hold a live performance. I thought “if I succeed, can I be the bridge between mainstream music and underground music?” There are many people that makes great music in the underground scene, so I thought when I become famous, I’ll give them a better environment to work in and I want to let the world hear my hyungs’ music.

And at the same time, I heard that BigHit Entertainment was holding an audition in Daegu. I only knew that producer Bang Shi Hyuk established the company but I still auditioned. The next day, I got the notice that I passed the audition. Later, someone told me that when he saw me, he immediately gave me a pass. Even though my rapping wasn’t really good at the time (laughs).

Came to Seoul, became a trainee
Ran counter to his (original) intention?!

I can still clearly remember the day that I came to Seoul, 7th November 2010, when I was in 2nd grade of high school. When I joined the company, my original intention wasn’t to become a rapper, I wanted to become a producer. So, I thought I didn’t need to dance, and I can leave rapping to those that are good at it. I thought I only need to be a producer. But that wasn’t the case (laughs). At the time, the company wanted to debut a group consists of rappers, rather than an idol group. However, the plan changed at the end. The members at the time were Rap Monster, J-Hope and I. Including Supreme Boi, i11evn hyung who’s currently working in the underground scene, and IRON hyung, who was one of the finalists in ‘Show Me The Money 3’. I think if we debuted like that, our rapping would be outstanding but we would probably have failed (laughs).

Rapper & Producer
Suga’s future goals

I’m able to walk on the path of music, it’s because of my brother, who’s 4 years older than me. Under my influence, my brother started to like Hip-Hop too. No one supported me in my family when I went to audition, except for my brother. They don’t approve of making music. My relatives even said to me: “what can you achieve from making music, just study properly.” So, I could only share my songs with my brother, he was my only listener. And I told my brother first when I passed the audition. We have a good relationship just like friends. I don’t usually drink but I drink a bit with my brother. Of course, my family support me now. The relatives that advised me to study even came to ask for my autograph (laughs).

I’ve been thinking lately that I want to be active as a producer. I’m not ambitious about being in the center, I just want to make music. I’m not interested in the entertainment industry, others want to either act or be on variety shows, but I don’t (laughs). Above all, I think the most important for BTS right now is to achieve #1 in Korea and Japan. And, I want to become the best rapper, the best producer. I don’t know how long it will take to achieve that but I’m going to give it a go.

BTS Biography - Jimin (Vol.5)
BTS Biography - V (Vol.3)

Trans: KIMMYYANG (from Korean mondomizel1)

“As soon as class is over, he heads straight to the little cafe down the street. It’s his escape from this new and stressful city life.”
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//A little Highschool!AU fanart because i need to practice backgrounds ㅜㅜ it’s not great but..
Hopefully I’ll be back on asks soon!

Disturbing

Now I have a very unpopular opinion, but I feel very compelled to share it (because I’m clearly a narcissist and believe my voice deserves to be heard). Now, let me start out by saying that I LOVED the new It movie! I mean I have a blog dedicated to Eddie and Richie….Um, this movie changed my fucking life. That being said I do think there is a lot of missed opportunities. I feel like the weakest link to the film was Andy Muschietti and his hesitation of making the film too disturbing. 

I honestly believe the reason the film was so successful and impacted people like it did was because of the performances of it’s uber talented cast, the dynamics and relationships between the characters, and the way anyone can find a person in the losers club they can relate to. It successfully creates a very deep sense of nostalgia. The thing is, those things overshadow the fact that this is a horror movie. It’s easy to forget this is a horror film, cause it comes off more like an action adventure film, like the Goonies. It practically only has an R rating because of the excessive swearing. 

My whole issue is that Andy had such interesting characters with so many internal issues that he didn’t use to their full potential. A lot of it was even in the original scripts and he just trimmed them and made the film much more mainstream and family friendly. 

With Bill he could have had Pennywise use his parents neglect to really scare him. Make it seem like they only loved Georgie and Bill was a burden. He could have made Bill’s fear his guilt. Have Pennywise take Georgie’s form and accuse him of being the reason he died. If he hadn’t made the boat or let him go outside, he would still be alive. That would only touched on. 

Bev’s home life was done mostly well, but it had little to do with Pennywise. Like Penny never took her father’s form, or never played on the issues she had a school. He could have totally made it a issue of isolation and indifference. LIke everyone in school didn’t care about how her father treated her and possibly even blamed her. Which is why everyone called her a slut. 

Eddie’s whole thing with his sexuality was totally ignored and that was frustrating. He could have easily included it in the Leper scene and it would have truly added something a large portion of the audience could relate to. To see Eddie grapple with his feeling about what the Leper says and how he resents his sexuality. How the community would react to it. 

Richie’s home life and implied bisexuality in the original scripts would have made his character so much more interesting. He was turned into comic relief and that bothered me. His relationship with Eddie is very subtly insinuated. Like, look…we can all agree that Stephen King put everything about Eddie’s sexuality and his relationship with Richie for a reason. It’s tactfully done, but it is clear he meant for the audience to infer it like most people have. Richie’s intelligence and how even though he is an amazing child, his parent still abuse and ignore him. All this could have be so compelling. 

Mike was the most underused of all the characters. He could have totally played on how Pennywise used the racial tensions in Derry to cause massive fear in the town then turned into a bird and just ate a bunch of people. The whole thing with his parents, the black spot, Henry’s racism. There is so fucking much and he just being a farmer….blah. UGh its frustrating.


Stan the man and his feeling towards his religion and his ocd could have been utilized by pennywise to such better effect. He could have played on mental illness and made him feel like he was going crazy. It would have been such and easy and inexpensive sequence. His fear, resentment towards Bill, and the lasting damage of the whole summer.   

Ben’s fear just seemed dumb. He could have had Pennywise explore his body image issues. Scare him by having pennywise take the form of Bev and have her say she could never love someone like him and then show him glimpses of Ben’s future self…but with binge eating disorder. Just eating himself to death. Alone.  So much better than a fucking headless boy. 

Henry, Patrick, and the Bower’s Gang’s friendship…. I’m not even gonna get into it. They could have been truly frightening, but also complicated characters the audience almost had sympathy towards. 

Andy could have made a horror movie that explored deeper themes! How people are the real monsters; how mental illnesses, racism, and sexuality can be much scarier than any mummy or leper; guilt; confrontation with mortality; mental and physical abuse; how much parents really affect a child’s development. NATURE VS NURTURE!! I love the movie, but I think Andy is too afraid to take it further..into greatness.  Tell me if you all agree or disagree….if you read this at all.