madame-royale

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Royalty Meme[2/8] Royal Children
Marie-Thérèse Charlotte, Madame Royale

Marie-Thérèse Charlotte was the firstborn child of Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette. Though she was not the son and heir many had hoped for, her long-awaited birth on December 19, 1778–eight and a half years after her parents’ wedding–was nonetheless cause for celebration. From birth, she was styled “Madame Royale,” the customary title of the French king’s eldest daughter. Both of her parents delighted in her. Her mother called her “Mousseline” and was the stricter of the two. She did everything in her power to instill Marie-Thérèse with a sense of humility and charity. Her father, on the other hand, had a tendency to spoil her, and she in turn idolized him. She was something of a “daddy’s girl.”

When Marie-Thérèse was almost three, her mother gave birth to a son at last. She and Louis-Joseph were joined by a second brother, Louis-Charles in 1785 and, briefly, by a baby sister called Sophie the following year. Sophie died just three weeks before her first birthday. The royal children were quite close, so both Sophie’s death and that of the sickly Louis-Joseph in the summer of 1789 were hard blows for the entire family.  Marie-Thérèse, however, was a very tall and healthy child. Pretty and intelligent, she took her status as Madame Royale quite seriously. Because she tried to emulate her mother’s regal behavior in public, some accused her of being haughty and arrogant. 

The outbreak of the French Revolution produced rapid and dramatic changes in the eleven-year-old princess’ life. These began with her family’s move from Versailles to Paris in late 1789. Three years later, with the monarchy abolished, they were imprisoned in the Tower Temple. There, Marie-Thérèse became increasingly isolated from her family. Her father was executed in January 1793; her brother, just eight, was taken away in July; and she was separated from her mother a month later. Her aunt and only remaining companion, Madame Elisabeth, was also executed the following spring. She spent another year in the Temple, during which time she wrote that she was “the most unhappy person in the world. She can obtain no news of her mother; nor be reunited to her, though she has asked it a thousand times.”

The day before she turned seventeen, Marie-Thérèse was released a from prison. She went to Vienna before moving to Latvia, where in 1799 she married her cousin Louis-Antoine and became the duchess of Angoulême. She and her remaining family spent the next fifteen years in England. When Napoleon was exiled in 1814, her uncle assumed the throne as Louis XVIII. Unsurprisingly, Marie-Thérèse found her return to France difficult emotionally. In 1824, Louis XVIII died and her father-in-law–who was her father’s youngest brother–became King Charles X. She was now Madame la Dauphine. She continued her charitable work and attempted to rehabilitate her parents’ memories until her father-in-law and then her husband both abdicated during the Revolution of 1830. Marie-Thérèse lived out the rest of her life in exile. She remained a staunch royalist and a devout Catholic until her death in 1851 in Vienna.

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→ Louis XVI and Marie Antoinette and their children

Madame Fille du Roi, the main preoccupations of Marie Antoinette were not political.Her chief joy was in the precocious development of her daughter. Marie Therese had the big blue eyes and healthy complexion that in babies make for admiration. She was also tall and strong, walking in her basketwork stroller by the time she was eight months old and shouting out, “Papa, Papa.” These preferential cries did not offend her mother; on the contrary she was delighted that father and daughter were in this way linked more strongly. As for Marie Antoinette, she could hardly love her more than she did , the child who was “mine".

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Get to Know me Meme, Royalist Edition

[7/10] Pieces of Jewellery - The Duchesse d'Angouleme’s Emerald Tiara

This tiara was made in 1819/1820 for Marie Therese Charlotte, Duchesse d'Angouleme, as a gift from her husband, Louis Antoine, the Duc d'Angouleme. It was made of unmounted stones from the French crown jewels, and set in gold and silver. It contains 40 emeralds and over a thousand diamonds.

When her father in law/uncle Charles X abdicated the throne in 1830, as did her husband immediately after, the family went into exile and Marie Therese was forced to return the tiara to the treasury. It remained packed away until Napoleon III came to the throne, when it was frequently worn by his wife, Empress Eugenie. Unfortunately, there are no known portraits or photographs of either woman wearing it. When Napoleon III went into exile in 1870, Eugenie also had to return the tiara to the treasury.

It was displayed at the Paris World’s Fair in 1878, and then at the Louvre in 1884. In 1887, it was sold at auction along with the majority of the other french crown jewels. It wasn’t seen again until it surfaced in the vaults of the Wartski jewellers. The owner was apparently unaware of its’ history, but allowed it to be displayed at the Victoria and Albert Museum from 1982-2002. The tiara was then but up for sale, but the British government placed a temporary export ban on it so that funds could be raised to keep it in the country. They weren’t successful in raising the money, but an arrangement was made with the Louvre museum to have it returned to their collection. It is now on display there, along with other surviving items from the French crown jewels.

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Thérèse had lived in many places, but there was none so haunted as Trianon, or as vibrant with memory. Its haunting was a wistful and compelling call to linger, as if the murmuring poplars and cedars entreated one to stay forever. The soul seemed drawn into an enchanted realm where time itself dallied. She breathed in the scented air. No one would ever live there for long in peace; no one could ever again make it a dwelling place, for the person who had enlivened Trianon with her own spontaneous magic was gone from the world. Trianon was no longer a home, but a tangible dream of lost happiness.

–Madame Royale by Elena Maria Vidal

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I pray to the sky for forgiveness
For those who suffered
Under the weight of my crown
I was only a mother.

→DREAMCAST// movies about historical figures I’d like to see.

//Sophie Turner as Marie Thérèse Of France

Marie Thérèse was born at the Palace of Versailles, first child and eldest daughter of King Louis XVI of France and 23 year old Queen Marie Antoinette, on 19 December 1778. When the Bastille was stormed by an armed mob on 14 July 1789, the situation reached a climax. The life of the 11-year old Madame Royale began to be affected as several members of the royal household were sent abroad for their own safety. The comte d'Artois, her uncle, and the duchesse de Polignac, governess to the royal children, emigrated on the orders of Louis XVI. Her stay in the Temple Tower was one of solitude and often great boredom. The two books she had, a prayer book by the name of The Imitation of Jesus Christ and Voyages by La Harpe, were read over and over, so much so that she quickly grew tired of them. But her appeal for more books were refused by government officials, and many other requests were frequently refused;on top of this, she often had to endure listening to her brother’s cries and screams whenever he was beaten. On 11 May, Robespierre visited Marie-Thérèse, but there is no record of the conversation. During her imprisonment, Marie-Thérèse was never told what had happened to her family. All she knew was that her father was dead. In late August 1795, Marie-Thérèse finally was told what had happened to her family, by Madame Renée de Chanterenne, her female companion. When she had been informed of each of their fates, the distraught Marie-Thérèse began to cry, letting out loud sobs of anguish and grief. It was only once the Terror was over that Marie-Thérèse was allowed to leave France. She was liberated on 18 December 1795, on the eve of her seventeenth birthday.

Marie Antoinette with her two eldest children, Marie-Thérèse Charlotte and the Dauphin Louis Joseph, in the Petit Trianon’s gardens, by Adolf Ulrik Wertmüller