madame de pompadour

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Madame de Pompadour par Chad Isley

Can we please ship Mickey Smith and Reinette? Just do yourself a favor for a second and imagine:

  • it’s Mickey’s first trip to outer space in the TARDIS. They find the fireplace, and good old tin-dog Mickey knocks the wrong thing and wheels around into 1700s France
  • he sees this little girl (and Mickey is good with kids), and he hears the clock—and he’s a mechanic, he knows a six-foot sound when he hears one—he is scared out of his mind, but Mickey Smith is not one to leave scared little kids, his grandmother taught him better than that
  • and there’s THE AUTOMATON. Mickey Smith, panicked in trying to protect this kid and not get killed in his first outing, catches the Automaton’s attention and gets it over by the fireplace and hooked to the ledge
  • Frantic, he smacks the thing that got him here and he’s back at the spaceship, automaton in tow, Ten mildly shocked but happy to play with more robots if Mickey will go get them
  • Ten is so distracted by the robot that he doesn’t notice a certain somebody pressing the thing again—Mickey wants to make sure the little French girl is okay—Rose’s “wait!” falls on empty air.
  • and oh shit, Mickey is met by this gorgeous woman, who calls him her imaginary friend and seems to remember him as a hero, an angel, not a scared guy—and oh no, this woman is Madame de Pompadour, isn’t she?!
  • quite a start for your first adventure
  • And when Mickey gets back through the fireplace, Rose and the Doctor have wandered off—of course they have, that’s what they do—so Mickey, looking for them, wanders through another door and into France again, and meets Reinette some more
  • and more automatons, of course; but Mickey’s a mechanic, he knows his way around those; delicate parts snap easily
  • Reinette is a delicate part, and wants to dance
  • Meanwhile, the Doctor and Rose are working it out from the ship—Reinette being 37 is what the droids want; and oh, no, the droids are about to strike.
  • Mickey doesn’t consult them. He has a horse (after all, he’s let Rose keep the Doctor), he has a mirror, he has Reinette—
  • Reinette.
  • Reinette, the only woman who has focused on him, and seen the hero he could be.
  • Reinette, so loyal that she rejoices even if he only shows up every few years.
  • Reinette, who is treated as an object by the droids just as much as he is treated as a tin dog by the rest of his life.
  • Reinette……
  • Mickey Smith jumps through the mirror, riding a horse. He and Reinette drink wine, and count the stars they would like to visit but never will now.
  • One wrong fireplace and Reinette is gone forever. Mickey reads her letter in the TARDIS. The Doctor and Rose leave him alone (alone, again). Mickey decides he will be the hero Reinette saw him as.
  • Next adventure, Mickey defeats thousands of Cybermen.
The signs as famous mistresses
  • Aries: Amalie Sophie Marianne von Wallmoden
  • Taurus: Hortense Catherine Schneider
  • Gemini: Hortense Mancini
  • Cancer: Liane de Pougy
  • Leo: Madame du Barry \ Louise de la Valliere
  • Virgo: Louise de Keroualle
  • Libra: Madame de Montespan
  • Scorpio: Barbara Villiers
  • Sagittarius: Émilie du Châtelet
  • Capricorn: Madame de Pompadour
  • Aquarius: Nell Gwyn
  • Pisces: Arabella Churchill

Moffat Appreciation Week - Day One: RTD Era

The remarkable women that are front and centre of these stories

“I am your mummy. I will always be your mummy.”

“I have seen the world inside your head and know that all things are possible.”

“I love old things.”

“You’ll see me again. You’ve got all of that to come. You and me, time and space. You watch us run!”

10

request by thesacredfireofloveM A D A M E   D E   P O M P A D O U R

Jeanne Antoinette Poisson, Marquise de Pompadour (December 29, 1721 – April 15, 1764) was the official cheif mistress of Louis XV from 1745 until her death. She claimed that at the age of nine, she was taken by her mother to a fortune teller and told that she would someday reign over the heart of a king. Apparently, her mother believed the prophecy and accordingly nicknamed her “Reinette” (meaning “little queen”). At adolescence, her mother took personal charge of her education at home by hiring tutors who taught her to recite entire plays by heart, play the clavicord, dance, sing, paint and engrave. She became an accomplished actress and singer, and also attended Paris’s famous Club de l'Entresol. The marquise had many enemies among the royal courtiers who felt it a disgrace that the king would thus compromise himself with a commoner. She was very sensitive to the unending libels called poissonnades, a pun on her family name, Poisson, which means “fish” in French.
The Marquise de Pompadour was an incredibly intelligent and accomplished woman. She was responsible for the development of the manufactory of Sèvres, which became one of the most famous porcelain manufacturers in Europe and which provided skilled jobs to the region. Reinette had an eye for architecture and design, planning buildings such as the Place de la Concorde and the Petit Trianon. She had a keen interest in literature and was a close friend of philosophes of the Lights, like Voltaire throughout her life. Her influence over Louis increased markedly through the 1750s, to the point where he allowed her considerable leeway in the determination of policy over a whole range of issues, from military matters to foreign affairs. Ther reasons for the Marquise’s influence over Louis were many: she decidedly established a cordial relationship with Marie Leszczyńska, the King’s wife ; she also put all of her effort into bringing fun into the King’s melancholy life ; she threw dinner parties for him and put on plays that exalted him and of course, she was a woman of verve and intelligence with whom the King sensed an intellectual equal.
In her later years, although they had ceased being lovers, the King and Jeanne remained very close friends, and Louis was devoted to her until her death from tuberculosis in 1764 at the age of forty-two. Even some her enemies admired her courage during the final painful weeks. Voltaire wrote: “I am very sad at the death of Madame de Pompadour. I was indebted to her and I mourn her out of gratitude. It seems absurd that while an ancient pen-pusher, hardly able to walk, should still be alive, a beautiful woman, in the midst of a splendid career, should die at the age of forty two."  (source of the text) 

gifs from Jeanne Poisson, Marquise de Pompadour - 2006