machine-knit

When I was in school, one of my art teachers used to say “this world needs more creators. There’s more than enough destroyers in the world today.”

Just a reminder, if you create anything–art, writing, food, machines, ideas, equations, knits, tools, gardens–the world needs you.

@Regrann from @obrienandolive - “When I was in school, one of my art teachers used to say, ‘This world needs more creators. There’s more than enough destroyers in the world today.” Just a reminder, if you create anything - art, writing, food, machines, ideas, equations, knits, tools, gardens - the world needs you.“⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀⠀
- Unknown 🌙 - #regrann

months and months ago, i told my mom that i had been doing a lot of cross-stitching, and was thinking about learning how to sew with anything resembling competence. i also showed her some cool resin jewelry i saw. i finally organized all of the things she has shown up at my house with since then, which includes: a box of embroidery hoops; a box of fabric and some patterns; some resin and molds; a box of cross-stitch pattern books, evenweave, aida cloth, and various kits. i think… i am going to have to find time to cross-stitch, soon.

anonymous asked:

Do you have any advise on how to come up with a culture's style, in terms of architecture and clothing? I can only think in what real life cultures wear and I don't want to simply copy and paste, but invent.

Mirintala: Start with looking at what’s there and changing aspects of it. Your setting will lead to a lot of the appropriate style. If you’re building underwater in a high pressure area, that will affect how your buildings look and what your characters would wear differently from a desert area.

Constablewrites:  Real life cultures can still help you, but you want to dig past the superficial aesthetic. Yes, “because it looks cool” is a factor in style, but things also become part of the culture for a reason. It’s about the materials they have available, the traits their society prizes and the traits it shames, the function a piece is supposed to serve, their religious beliefs, the particular ways they need to keep nature from killing them, all that sort of thing.

For example, Washington DC contains a lot of Greco-Roman architecture because the founders were trying to emulate that sort of society. The original buildings they were copying were built that way because hey, look at all this marble and granite we have. Same look, different origin, different insight into the people who made it.

Bina: One thing to help get started is to figure out a culture’s “schtick,” for lack of a better word. The culture will have nuances and sub-styles within itself, but to an outsider, what stands out? For a clothes example, the Victorian era’s massive skirts, Japan’s flowing sleeves on their colorful robes, feudal Korea’s aristocratic hats (note that these are all upper-class instances, as they tend to have the money to afford those high-fashion styles despite their impracticality. But they sure are flashy!). 

For architecture, a gothic churches pointy and knobby spires and intricate stained class windows. Greco-roman columns. What stands out to the outsider when they see your culture? Pick something and run with it. (Also note that the memorable things about a culture’s architecture and fashion tend to have very strong silhouettes. You could recognize a Victorian dress or gothic church by its silhouette alone. That’s part of what makes them so memorable!) 

Once you have a centerpiece for the fashion and/or architecture it’ll help you build up around that while you find things that compliment them. An inside-out approach, you could say.

And of course, get a sense of the diversity real life has in terms of fashion and architecture. You can mix and match obscure things for ages and come up with something unique. Pinterest is good for this! Check out this link where most of the world’s nationalities/cultures have their own board (the first 7 boards are more generic but after that it’s specific to nation/culture. Some boards have more content than others): https://www.pinterest.com/misericordemika/

MareeB:  Both architecture and clothing is hugely dependent on climate and culture. Before the last 100 years or so, buildings needed to be functional for staying cool or warm. Take a look at cultures around the world that share similar climates with the part of your world that you’re working on. And don’t just look aesthetically, dig deeper to get an understanding of why buildings and fashion worked the way they did.

Another factor to take into account is the technology the culture has access too. Machine made knit fabrics that we have today allow for all sorts of fashions that were simply not possible before machine knitting was invented. The same goes for other modern inventions like elastic and zippers.

Constablewrites:  Anything with textiles was HUGELY labor intensive before industrialization. Like when you see one of those massive intricate tapestries, you’re looking at literal years of work from many people. (I remember the first time I tried to cross-stitch I thought I could knock out the piece in an afternoon. It took me three months.) So if you’ve got tons of intricate embroidery and beading everywhere, you’re looking at some combination of obscene wealth, a labor pool that can be tasked with needlework, or technology that will facilitate the work.

MareeB:  The same goes for buildings. Most of the impressive architecture of our time is dependent on engineered materials. Starting with steel. Ancient peoples were amazingly skilled and had great technologies, but they were constrained by their time period, so take that into account. Of course if your civilization is futuristic, or divergent then you have a lot more open to you.

anonymous asked:

Hi! I've read many of your posts and they're awesome! Think of this one! If the Dragon Riders were in a Modern AU what would be their hobbies? What kind of animals will their dragons be?

Thank you so much!

There have been lots of different interesting modern AUs whereby the dragons have become cats, dogs, or even horses. There’s some good appeal to each idea. Personally, I wouldn’t mind making the dragons based upon the creatures they were designed from; so, Toothless would be a cat, Stormfly a bird, Meatlug a dog, and… I guess Barf and Belch would be a snake and Hookfang a lizard or something.

Now for hobbies…

Hiccup

Hiccup is the inventive powerhouse of Berk. In a modern AU, Hiccup would likely be just as revolutionary - and the area where our greatest technological development is currently… is computers. I can easily imagine Hiccup as someone who constantly fiddles around with both computer hardware and software. He’s built his own machines. He knows how to program in multiple languages. I like to imagine modern!Hiccup as a techie who spends a lot of his hobby free time playing around with computers.

If we want, we could also suggest that Hiccup has other hobbies in other areas of invention and creating. Maybe Hiccup is decent at fixing cars, too, or at the very least knows the basics. Maybe he’s taken a woodworking class in high school. His high school physics projects were possibly a little over the top. If Hiccup enters any club at his high school, it’s the robotics club.

Another significant area of hobbies for Hiccup is going to be the arts. Hiccup is canonically a talented artist in the DreamWorks franchise. There’s no reason why Hiccup wouldn’t enjoy sketching and drawing in the modern world, too. His preferred art style is probably realism, with an emphasis of making the image more photorealistic as versus developing a recognizable artistic style. He’s probably drawn a lot on paper, but given as he loves the latest technology, does a bit with digital art, too.

I don’t think Hiccup would have gotten into sports. Stoick might have tried to put his kid into a few sports when he was younger, and maybe Hiccup tried some other sports on his own volition in the desperate attempt to appear “cool.” No success. Hiccup would not be an athlete growing up. The one potential area of exception is equestrian sports. Even if I do like Toothless as a cat best, there’s still something fun to be said about Hiccup having an ability to ride an animal extremely well in a modern AU. Hiccup could be quite talented riding horses, capable of competing in every event from jumping to dressage.

Astrid

Astrid, unlike Hiccup, is an accomplished athlete. She tried soccer/football at a young age and was pretty good at it. She stuck with it for a number of years until she switched to rugby. On top of that, Astrid has trained as a gymnast since she was very young, and also tried her hand at several martial arts. Even for sports she has not officially competed in, she still manages to perform impressively. She steals the day for informal volley ball matches she has with friends, and everyone wants her on their team for ultimate frisbee. Heck, she’s probably wrestled some of her friends to the ground on random occasions, too.

Astrid spends so much time on her academics and competitive sports that she doesn’t have too many hobbies outside of these. She’s never had the time and attention to develop her cooking skills, though on the rare occasion she tries to make eggnog, everyone in the family runs frantically away.

Snotlout

Snotlout in the DreamWorks franchise seems to be accomplished with the needle. Maybe this translates to a modern world, too; Snotlout actually knows how to cross-stitch and work a sewing machine and knit scarves (which he always claims are made by his aunt, not him).

Snotlout also mentions working out in the first HTTYD movie. I bet Snotlout loves going to the gym to lift weights and tone his hot body several times a week. He’s probably not that talented at actual team sports (despite trying to sign up and show off on a few of the most popular sports), but he can make up for his embarrassing year of football by lifting impressively at the gym. Well, he thinks it’s impressive, anyway. And it’s not bad. Though… Astrid can outlift him.

Fishlegs

DreamWorks’ biggest nerd will be a nerd in the modern world, too. To be honest, Fishlegs’ hobbies are really easy for me to imagine!

Fishlegs plays Magic: The Gathering and has even been to a few local tournaments. He knows all the ins-and-outs of the game, the most expensive cards, the best tactics, you name it. You get him started talking about MTG… and he won’t shut up for another few hours. He’s also a huge video game lover and can be seen on the PC or console several hours a day. Especially, he’s obsessed with League of Legends.

Fishlegs enjoys watching nerd culture movies and knows a decent amount of comic book material. He’ll watch superhero movies and get into debates about which hero would beat who in what sort of competition. You’ll find him at the occasional local comic or sci-fi convention. Star Wars, Star Trek, Firefly, Teen Titans… he’s enjoyed them all.

In high school, Fishlegs enjoyed a few academic competitions, especially in the sciences. I am sure he’s participated in both Science Bowl and Science Olympiad. He’s probably gotten a few medals from Science Olympiad at both the regionals and state level… maybe even making it to the national competition.

It’s also fairly easy for me to see Fishlegs as a band geek and/or orch dork.

Tuffnut

Tuffnut also seems to know a bit about needlework given comments in RTTE. He also seems to like interior decorating and other such things. Perhaps in the modern world Tuffnut has a good eye for fabric and tailorsmanship, too. I’m going to suggest this not so much because it’s in his character but because it’s amusing to consider: but Tuffnut making cosplay. That could be entertaining. Or maybe it’s just unusually elaborate Halloween costumes? It’s a holiday he and Ruffnut get a little too engrossed in.

I don’t imagine Tuffnut being involved in too many activities, especially not formal clubs or extracurriculars. However, there’s one exception: theatre. Tuffnut adores theatre, and I’m sure he’s auditioned for a few roles at his local high school. Even when it’s just English class and the teacher assigns the students into groups to act out a Shakespeare scene, Tuffnut gets… overdramatic and involved.

It’s not exactly a “hobby” but I’m sure that Ruffnut and Tuffnut spent many hours together enacting pranks at school.

If Tuffnut got involved in a sport, it’d be figure skating. He’d go for the figure skating; Ruffnut would go for the hockey.

Ruffnut

Like Astrid, I could also imagine Ruffnut as a rugby player. Ruffnut is fierce, downright fierce, at the sport. There’s no fear. There are times that Ruffnut gets irritated and jealous that her teammate Astrid receives a lot of the credit - Astrid is a bit more popular than Ruffnut - but Ruff’s coach is fully aware of how bold and dedicated a player the Thorston twin is.

When Ruffnut enters college, she finds herself participating in some extreme experiences. She’s gone bungee jumping and skydiving multiple times and has greatly enjoyed both experiences.

S3E06 ‘Dolce’ Notes
  • O.o  Hannibal… You left your jacket behind.

    Why would you do that???

  • Okay, this is quite sumptuous-looking and good and I’m all for Hannibal in the bath, but you know there’s going to be water ALL over the floor, right?

  • The cut down the centre of the palm: are we going for a ‘wounds of the Crucifixion’ thing here?

  • WAIT.  They caught the body by hand?  Do they not have one of those body-catching inflatable pillow things???  (See how educated and articulate I am, here?)

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