m5*

"Man, I’ll tell you. Doesn’t matter how certain you think you are. You still get down on that knee and everything turns…you just get woozy and you’re like, ‘I’m doing this. Oh my god.’ And you can’t be confident about it. It’s almost like it’s impossible. I’m a confident person, but I got down on that knee and everything changed immediately. I lost my equilibrium. I had to get on the other one. […] I’ve usually got some charming thing to say. But nothing. I remembered one thing about it, and I’m not going to share most of it because that’s for me obviously. But the one thing that I will say is that I did say at one point, ‘Both knees. Like look, I got on both knees.’ And it didn’t sound charming at all. ‘Both knees,’ and she’s like, ‘What?' I was like, 'Never mind that.'” - Adam Levine, on proposing to Behati Prinsloo

The Whirlpool Galaxy

M51, also known as NGC 5194 or the Whirlpool Galaxy, is having a close encounter with a nearby companion galaxy, NGC 5195, just off the upper edge of this image. The companion’s gravitational pull is triggering star formation in the main galaxy, as seen in brilliant detail by numerous, luminous clusters of young and energetic stars. The bright clusters are highlighted in red by their associated emission from glowing hydrogen gas.

The Whirlpool galaxy, M51, has been one of the most photogenic galaxies in amateur and professional astronomy. Easily photographed and viewed by smaller telescopes, this celestial beauty is studied extensively in a range of wavelengths by large ground- and space-based observatories. This Hubble composite image shows visible starlight as well as light from the emission of glowing hydrogen, which is associated with the most luminous young stars in the spiral arms.

Credit: NASA/Hubble