m27

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Colt IAR

The Infantry Automatic Rifle (IAR) was one of Colt’s entries into the program of the same name to replace the M249 SAW’s in the USMC’s inventory. Colt’s rifle lost the bid to the H&K 416 which would later be designated the M27 IAR. The massive bulk in the handguard is actually a heat sink designed to help cool the rifle during full-auto use. The Colt IAR is in use with the Mexican military and a few of the uppers were available on the U.S market when Colt filed for bankruptcy and sold off inventory. Note the Armatac 150 round drum. (GRH)

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M27 Infantry Automatic Rifle (IAR)

A lightweight weapon firing 5.56 NATO currently in the process of being procured by the US Marine Corps and intended to enhance an automatic rifleman’s maneuverability. Based on the Heckler & Koch HK416, the IAR is classified by the Corps as a Squad Automatic Weapon and, according to Marine Brass, will be replacing a portion of the M249 light machine guns.

M27: The Dumbbell Nebula 

The first hint of what will become of our Sun was discovered inadvertently in 1764. At that time, Charles Messier was compiling a list of diffuse objects not to be confused with comets. The 27th object on Messier’s list, now known as M27 or the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core. M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky, and can be seen toward the constellation of the Fox (Vulpecula) with binoculars. It takes light about 1000 years to reach us from M27, shown above in colors emitted by hydrogen and oxygen.

Understanding the physics and significance of M27 was well beyond 18th century science. Even today, many things remain mysterious about bipolar planetary nebula like M27, including the physical mechanism that expels a low-mass star’s gaseous outer-envelope, leaving an X-ray hot white dwarf.

The Dumbbell Nebula aka M27 is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core. M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae in the sky, and can be seen toward the constellation of the Fox (Vulpecula) with binoculars. It takes light about 1,000 years to reach us from M27, shown above in colors emitted by hydrogen and oxygen.

(Image Credit: Bill Snyder Photography)

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Mle 1886 ‘Lebel’ Rifle - “Fusil de 8mm Modèle 1886″

Designed in 1886, produced from 1887 to 1920 by MAC, MAT and MAS.
8x50mmR Lebel, 8+1+1 rounds.

Read below for everything you wanted to know about this rifle, and then more, and then even more, Jippers you didn’t need to know all that, what the fuck it’s still going, why did they keep it for this long, just let the fucking thing die already.

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M27: The Dumbbell Nebula : The first hint of what will become of our Sun was discovered inadvertently in 1764. At that time, Charles Messier was compiling a list of diffuse objects not to be confused with comets. The 27th object on Messiers list, now known as M27 or the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core. M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky, and can be seen toward the constellation of the Fox with binoculars. It takes light about 1000 years to reach us from M27, shown above in colors emitted by hydrogen and oxygen. Understanding the physics and significance of M27 was well beyond 18th century science. Even today, many things remain mysterious about bipolar planetary nebula like M27, including the physical mechanism that expels a low-mass stars gaseous outer-envelope, leaving an X-ray hot white dwarf. via NASA

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The first hint of what will become of our Sun was discovered inadvertently in 1764. At that time, Charles Messier was compiling a list of diffuse objects not to be confused with comets. The 27th object on Messier’s list, now known as M27 or the Dumbbell Nebula, is a planetary nebula, the type of nebula our Sun will produce when nuclear fusion stops in its core. M27 is one of the brightest planetary nebulae on the sky, and can be seen toward the constellation of the Fox (Vulpecula) with binoculars. It takes light about 1000 years to reach us from M27, shown above in colors emitted by hydrogen and oxygen. Understanding the physics and significance of M27 was well beyond 18th century science. Even today, many things remain mysterious about bipolar planetary nebula like M27, including the physical mechanism that expels a low-mass star’s gaseous outer-envelope, leaving an X-ray hot white dwarf.

Credit: Bill Snyder

Time And Space