lynch foundation

Creative Inspiration: David Lynch and Finding and Being True to Your Voice

When an audience member asks David Lynch “What drives you to make a film? What makes you go from one particular idea and make a full feature film out of it?” the celebrated director of mind-bending films like Eraserhead and Blue Velvet answers, You’re going down the street, and girls are passing by. Pretty nice looking girls. It’s not doing it though. You round the corner, and boom: there she is. No question about it. And you are in love. This is the thing. That’s what drives you. Anyone who follows David Lynch knows the director is passionate about film and that his passion for the art of cinema equals in measure his philosophical views on creativity and filmmaking. His answer to what drives him to make a film is precisely what ought to drive all filmmakers to pursue the making of a film when such an endeavor demands so much that it seems like an uphill battle: love. The David Lynch Foundation offers a collection of lectures and interviews with Lynch discussing the creative process and filmmaking as well as transcendental meditation. The brilliance of the filmmaker shines throughout this documentary, making it an inspiring watch for artists and filmmakers.

David Lynch and the making of Eraserhead

On Capturing Ideas and Inspiring Your Creativity 

Ideas. We’re nothing without an idea. So I say that a desire for an idea is like a bait on a hook, and you’re desiring an idea, and you have to have patience just like you do in fishing. How deep that hook goes depends on the size of that ball of consciousness. And desire, another word for it is focus. Just focus on something, it’s a little bit like daydreaming. Thoughts come and thoughts come and thoughts come and maybe Boom, an idea comes that is so thrilling that you’ve caught a little purple fish, with red fins, and little dancing speckled eyes. And this little fish can be just a fragment of the final film, but you love this fragment, you love this fish. And that idea you write it down so you won’t forget it. Then now that you have that fish, an even more powerful bait, and soon others will swim in and join to it. And a thing will start emerging called a script…It’s all ideas coming. Ideas that we, that I fall in love with. And I’m going to fall in love with different ideas than you will but there’s billions, trillions of ideas coming, ideas for everything…Then you get the ideas organized in a script, and then you translate those ideas to cinema. And along the way you stay open because a thing isn’t finished till it’s finished. There can be happy accidents. You say, “How did I get so lucky to get this thing, I thought this was complete. But this is beyond the beyond fitting in here and jumping it.” Stay on your toes, and don’t walk away from any element until it feels correct. Because it’s built out of many, many, many elements. Stay true to the idea all along the road and then you have some hope of the whole working.

On Failure and Success

Failures are so incredible. A failure is a big, big sadness and a horror, but there’s no where to go but up. So it’s a freedom as a result of a failure, a huge euphoric freedom. There’s no way you can lose more, you can just gain. A success is so beautiful, but then, “Oh, my goodness, what if I fall? The next thing better be very very special or the whole thing is going to crumble.” You get tense. You start worrying. A success can be a nightmare. Both things have the good and the bad.

On the Aim of Cinema Being to Create New Worlds and Experiences for the Spectator

In my mind, I’ve had the great privilege and euphoria of translating ideas. Ideas that can create a world that people can go into and have an experience. Here’s a theater, and you’re going along in your world, and you stop in, and you sit, and that screen is giant, and the sound is good. But the lights are on now, and the people are still seating. And then suddenly the lights dim and the curtain opens. And the thing begins, and we can go into another world and only exist there because of that film. It’s a magical beautiful thing. Take people into another world and give them experiences. Take yourself into that other world and give yourself an experience. It’s a magical medium. That’s the role: to make new worlds.

David Lynch and the making of Blue Velvet

On the Myth of the Tortured Artist

This is a very beautiful important question, and this is part of the myth, I think. Van Gogh did suffer. He suffered a lot, but I think he didn’t suffer while he was painting. He went out to paint because he loved to paint, and it might have been one of the happiest, only happy times in his life when he was painting. It was so freeing for him to be painting, but he didn’t need to be suffering to do those paintings…The more you suffer, the less you want to create. If you’re truly depressed, they say you can’t even get out of bed let alone create. If you’re truly angry, anger occupies the whole brain, poisons the artist, poisons the environment, little room for creativity. I use this example. If you have a splitting headache, a splitting headache, and you have nausea, you’re vomiting, and you have diarrhea on top of that, how much work are you going to be doing and how much are you going to be enjoying it. Give the person a technique to lift that sickness, lift that negativity, and enjoy life.

On the Importance of Your Own Artistic Style and Being True to Your Work

Be true to yourself. Have your own voice ring out. Other things can inspire you, but find your own voice, be true to that voice, don’t let anybody fiddle with it, never turn down a good idea but never take a bad idea, and be true to the ideas, all the way along, every element.

Lectures and Interviews with David Lynch: Find Your Own Voice, Be True to That Voice

When an audience member asks David Lynch “What drives you to make a film? What makes you go from one particular idea and make a full feature film out of it?” the celebrated director of mind-bending films like Eraserhead and Blue Velvet answers, You’re going down the street, and girls are passing by. Pretty nice looking girls. It’s not doing it though. You round the corner, and boom: there she is. No question about it. And you are in love. This is the thing. That’s what drives you. Anyone who follows David Lynch knows the director is passionate about film and that his passion for the art of cinema equals in measure his philosophical views on creativity and filmmaking. His answer to what drives him to make a film is precisely what ought to drive all filmmakers to pursue the making of a film when such an endeavor demands so much that it seems like an uphill battle: love. The David Lynch Foundation offers a collection of lectures and interviews with Lynch discussing the creative process and filmmaking as well as transcendental meditation. The brilliance of the filmmaker shines throughout this documentary, making it an inspiring watch for artists and filmmakers.

David Lynch and the making of Eraserhead

On Capturing Ideas and Inspiring Your Creativity 

Ideas. We’re nothing without an idea. So I say that a desire for an idea is like a bait on a hook, and you’re desiring an idea, and you have to have patience just like you do in fishing. How deep that hook goes depends on the size of that ball of consciousness. And desire, another word for it is focus. Just focus on something, it’s a little bit like daydreaming. Thoughts come and thoughts come and thoughts come and maybe Boom, an idea comes that is so thrilling that you’ve caught a little purple fish, with red fins, and little dancing speckled eyes. And this little fish can be just a fragment of the final film, but you love this fragment, you love this fish. And that idea you write it down so you won’t forget it. Then now that you have that fish, an even more powerful bait, and soon others will swim in and join to it. And a thing will start emerging called a script…It’s all ideas coming. Ideas that we, that I fall in love with. And I’m going to fall in love with different ideas than you will but there’s billions, trillions of ideas coming, ideas for everything…Then you get the ideas organized in a script, and then you translate those ideas to cinema. And along the way you stay open because a thing isn’t finished till it’s finished. There can be happy accidents. You say, “How did I get so lucky to get this thing, I thought this was complete. But this is beyond the beyond fitting in here and jumping it.” Stay on your toes, and don’t walk away from any element until it feels correct. Because it’s built out of many, many, many elements. Stay true to the idea all along the road and then you have some hope of the whole working.

Be inspired with Room to Dream: David Lynch and the Independent Filmmaker

On Failure and Success

Failures are so incredible. A failure is a big, big sadness and a horror, but there’s no where to go but up. So it’s a freedom as a result of a failure, a huge euphoric freedom. There’s no way you can lose more, you can just gain. A success is so beautiful, but then, “Oh, my goodness, what if I fall? The next thing better be very very special or the whole thing is going to crumble.” You get tense. You start worrying. A success can be a nightmare. Both things have the good and the bad.

On the Aim of Cinema Being to Create New Worlds and Experiences for the Spectator

In my mind, I’ve had the great privilege and euphoria of translating ideas. Ideas that can create a world that people can go into and have an experience. Here’s a theater, and you’re going along in your world, and you stop in, and you sit, and that screen is giant, and the sound is good. But the lights are on now, and the people are still seating. And then suddenly the lights dim and the curtain opens. And the thing begins, and we can go into another world and only exist there because of that film. It’s a magical beautiful thing. Take people into another world and give them experiences. Take yourself into that other world and give yourself an experience. It’s a magical medium. That’s the role: to make new worlds.

David Lynch and the making of Blue Velvet

On the Myth of the Tortured Artist

This is a very beautiful important question, and this is part of the myth, I think. Van Gogh did suffer. He suffered a lot, but I think he didn’t suffer while he was painting. He went out to paint because he loved to paint, and it might have been one of the happiest, only happy times in his life when he was painting. It was so freeing for him to be painting, but he didn’t need to be suffering to do those paintings…The more you suffer, the less you want to create. If you’re truly depressed, they say you can’t even get out of bed let alone create. If you’re truly angry, anger occupies the whole brain, poisons the artist, poisons the environment, little room for creativity. I use this example. If you have a splitting headache, a splitting headache, and you have nausea, you’re vomiting, and you have diarrhea on top of that, how much work are you going to be doing and how much are you going to be enjoying it. Give the person a technique to lift that sickness, lift that negativity, and enjoy life.

On the Importance of Your Own Artistic Style and Being True to Your Work

Be true to yourself. Have your own voice ring out. Other things can inspire you, but find your own voice, be true to that voice, don’t let anybody fiddle with it, never turn down a good idea but never take a bad idea, and be true to the ideas, all the way along, every element, and start your transcendental meditation.

Gansey had a sense of incredible rightness, then, with everyone assembled by the Pig. Like Blue, not the ley line, was the missing piece that he’d been needing all these years, like the search for Glendower wasn’t truly underway until she was part of it. She was right like Ronan had been right, like Adam had been right, like Noah had been right. When each of them had joined him, he’d felt a rush of relief, and in the helicopter, he’d felt exactly the same way when he realized it was her voice on the recorder.
—  maggie stiefvater, the raven boys
Vans Joins City of Boston for the Grand Opening of the Lynch Family Skatepark‏

This past Saturday, Vans joined thousands of skateboarders, BMX riders and passionate city locals from greater Boston to celebrate the long-awaited grand opening of the Lynch Family Skatepark. As the final contributor to the project, Vans provided a leadership commitment of $1.5M, joining The Charles River Conservancy (CRC), the Massachusetts Department of Conservation and Recreation (DCR), and the Lynch Foundation in supporting a brand new community skatepark located in East Cambridge, MA. The exciting ribbon cutting ceremony welcomed various dignitaries to the podium, including key city officials, representatives from the CRC and DCR, Vans skateboarding am Rowan Zorilla and legends Tony Alva and Ray Barbee, rounded out by a warm welcome from Master of Ceremonies, Vans’ own Steve Van Doren.

With steadfast leadership from the CRC’s Renata Von Tscharner and enthusiastic commitment by Vans, the $5M, 40,000-square-foot Lynch Family Skatepark project has finally triumphed after being in the works for more than a decade. Vans’ contribution to the city’s laborious efforts provided the final dollars needed to begin construction, and in addition to this support, Vans has secured giving $25,000 each year for seven years to the DCR for ongoing maintenance of the skatepark.

“Since our founder left Massachusetts to start up Vans in California, we have sought ways to give back to our original New England roots,” said Vans and VF Action Sports President Kevin Bailey. “Vans is honored to join the city of Boston, the DCR and all the dignitaries who worked so hard to make this happen, to provide a platform for locals to express themselves through skateboarding as our brand has done for nearly 50 years. Vans’ commitment to this incredible partnership is strong and spirited, and we look forward to supporting the Lynch Family Skatepark for many years to come.”

Photos: Topher Baldwin

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Jerry Seinfeld talks Transcendental Meditation at David Lynch Foundation Gala