luther young

Black Girls Classics

The Playlist Series: African American/Black American Weddings, The First Dance

Requested By: riamonaee15

Etta James: At Last
K-Ci & JoJo: All My Life
Whitney Houston: I Will Always Love You
John Legend: Stay With You
Patti LaBelle: If Only You Knew
SWV: You’re Always On My Mind
The Isley Brothers: For the Love of You
John Legend: You & I
Beyonce: Halo
Faith Evans: I Love You
Four Tops/Whitney Houston: I Believe In You and Me
Tammi Terrel & Marvin Gaye/Cheryl Lynn & Luther Vandross: If This World Were Mine
Anita Baker: Sweet Love
Percy Sledge: When a Man Loves a Woman
New Edition: Can You Stand the Rain
Rufus & Chaka Khan: Sweet Thing
Jill Scott: He Loves Me
Nat King Cole & Natalie Cole: Unforgettable
Whitney Houston: You Give Good Love
Jaheim: Anything
Rose Royce: Wishing on A Star
Ginuwine: Differences
The O'Jays: Stairway to Heaven
Mariah Carey: When I Saw You
Aaliyah: At Your Best (You Are Love)
Dru Hill: These Are the Times
Babyface: Every Time I Close My Eye
Brian McKnight: Back At One
Minne Riperton: Loving You
India Arie: Ready For Love
Troop: All I Do Is Think of You
Prince: Adore
Kindred The Family: Where Would I be
Chaka Khan: Through the Fire
Jagged Edge: Promise
Dondria: You’re the One
Kevon Edmonds: 24/7
Kem: I Can’t Stop Loving You
Stevie Wonder/Luther Vandross/Donell Jones: Knocks Me Off My Feet
Tony! Toni! Tone!: Whatever You Want
Musiq Soulchild: Dontchange
Beyonce: Speechless
Seal: Kiss From A Rose
Case: Happily Ever After
Kem: Share My Life
Keyshia Cole: Love
Gerald Levert: Made to Love You
Musiq Soulchild: Love
The Deele: Two Occasions
Mawell: Fortunate
Xscape: The Arms of the One Who Loves You
India Arie: The Truth
Tendy Pendergrass: Love T.K.O
Kenny Lattimore: For You
SWV: Weak
Musiq Soulchild: sobeautiful
Mariah Carey: Vision of Love
Aretha Franklin: You’re All I Need
Gladys Kinght & The Pimps: Best Thing That Happened to Me
Beyonce: Rather Die Young
Luther Vandross: Here and Now
Pressure: Love And Affection
Heatwave/Luther Vandross: Always & Forever
Chaka Khan: Ain’t Nobody
John Legend: All of Me
Alicia Keys: If I Ain’t Got You
Luther Vandross: All The Woman I Need
Ruff Endz: Someone to Love You
Stevie Wonder: You and I
Beyonce: Dangerously In Love
Avant & Keye Wyatt: You & I
Shanice: I Love Your Smile
Maria Carey: Open Arms
Musiq Soulchild: Teachme
Roberta Flack & Donny Hathaway/Beyonce & Luther Vandross: The Closer I Get to You
John Legend: P.D.A. (We Just Don’t Care)
Stevie Wonder: Signed, Sealed Delivered (I’m Yours)
Atlantic Starr: Always
Luther Vandross & Mariah Care: Endless Love
Blackstreet: Let’s Stay in Love
John Legend: So High
Lionel Richie & Diana Ross: Endless Love
Whitney Houston: Greatest Love of All
Mariah Carey: Underneath the Stars
Jagged Edge: Good Luck Charm

9

my love & education on Nina Simone has only grown stronger after seeing her documentary on netflix “What Happened, Miss Simone?”

everyone should see it honestly, such an extraordinary, misunderstood, strong woman

“young, gifted, and black” 

buzzfeed.com
What Happened To Black Lives Matter?
Donald Trump’s election and presidency has inspired the biggest outpouring of liberal activism in more than a decade. But Black Lives Matter seems less visible than a year ago. After a meteoric rise t
By Darren Sands

The Highlander Research and Education Center is one of the unsung mileposts of the struggle for civil rights. People like Rosa Parks, John Lewis, and Ralph Abernathy refined their organizing skills at Highlander. It was there, in 1957, that a young Martin Luther King Jr. first heard Pete Seeger sing “We Shall Overcome.” On his way to the airport after the anniversary of what was then known as the Highlander Folk School, King proclaimed, “There’s something about that song that haunts you.” Highlander has since moved farther east, but its mission remains the same.

That’s why shortly after the 2016 election, on November 18, several dozen Black Lives Matter leaders selected it as the place to gather.

Top activists in the movement — like Alicia Garza, cofounder of the Black Lives Matter network of organizations (a namesake group), Charlene Carruthers of the Black Youth Project 100, and others — met to privately discuss how to move forward in Trump’s America. Protests had already dominated the news for days. This would be the time for decisive action, undergirded by a clear strategy. Here, in the hills of Tennessee, the activists would come together for a meeting of groups involved in the Movement for Black Lives, an umbrella group of organizations that want the same things, and devise a plan to address the new president, the shock of his election, the law and order he had promised during the campaign, and the devastating blow it all had delivered to generational movements about race and criminal justice policy in the United States. They would devise a plan — like the heroes of the civil rights movement once had decades before.

That good feeling didn’t last long. Few people want to talk about exactly what went wrong — how exactly the meeting devolved. But one problem, according to people who attended or were briefed on the meeting, was pretty simple: The ideas weren’t that good.

Some activists pitched things that had been pitched before. Someone pitched a plan that would require the recruitment of new groups into the fold, and leadership of the so-called resistance. And someone pitched a grand vision: the organization of 1 million black people. This last idea in particular infuriated people inside and outside the meeting. After years of organizing, local activists were cash-strapped, trying to keep their people motivated, and struggling to coordinate with other groups nationally while staying relevant at home. One million black people organized? Organized by whom? Organized for what? And this was the plan?

On top of that — people fumed over this — the meeting had done little to address the structural problems that had dragged down the movement since its meteoric rise from dispersed beginnings to national political influence. Many local activists felt they couldn’t get access to funding, and didn’t know who to take it up with. Organizers felt like they’d been lured in before by the promise of greater collaboration, the sharing of resources, and cultivation of a social community — only to feel left out, especially when it came to the Movement for Black Lives, an umbrella group of organizations that want the same things. Many chafed at the tenet, repeated by the press, that Black Lives Matter was free from hierarchy and instead began to question the existence of tight control exercised by a small group of activists. “The hierarchy was clearer than ever, even though folks are sure there isn’t one on the outside,” said one person briefed on the meeting. For months during the campaign last year, key progressives had watched Black Lives Matter and kept wondering two things many activists on the inside were starting to wonder themselves: What is the movement’s strategy? What is the end goal?

Nobody resolved the structural issues at Highlander. There was no one big plan.

(Continue Reading)

6

“Our lives begin to end the day we become silent about things that matter.”

We need the wisdom, leadership, and perseverance of Martin Luther King, Jr.​, now more than ever.

Here is what we can learn from Ava DuVernay’s inspirational and electrifying MLK drama Selma, by Matt Barone.

youtube

Today is National Tap Dance Day in honor of Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, who was born Luther Robinson in Richmond, Virginia, on May 25, 1878. His father, Maxwell, worked in a machine shop, while his mother, Maria, was a choir singer. After both of his parents died in 1885, Robinson was raised by his grandmother, Bedilia, who had been a slave earlier in her life. According to Robinson, he used physical force to compel his brother, Bill, to switch names with him, since he did not care for his given name of Luther. Additionally, as a young man, he earned the nickname “Bojangles” for his contentious tendencies.

At the age of 5, Robinson began dancing for a living, performing in local beer gardens. In 1886, at the age of 9, he joined Mayme Remington’s touring troupe. In 1891, he joined a traveling company, later performing as a vaudeville act. He achieved great success as a nightclub and musical-comedy performer. At this stage of his career, he performed almost exclusively in black theaters before black audiences.

In 1908, Robinson met Marty Forkins, who became his manager. Forkins urged Robinson to develop his solo act in nightclubs. Robinson took a break from performance to serve as a rifleman in World War I. Along with fighting in the trenches, Robinson was also a drum major who led the regimental band up Fifth Avenue upon the regiment’s return from Europe.

In 1928, he starred on Broadway in the hugely successful musical revue Blackbirds of 1928, which featured his famous “stair dance.” Blackbirds was a revue starring African-American performers, intended for white audiences. The show was a breakthrough for Robinson. He became well known as “Bojangles,” which connoted a cheerful and happy-go-lucky demeanor for his white fans, despite the nearly polar-opposite meaning of the nickname in the black community. His catchphrase, “Everything’s copacetic,” reinforced Robinson’s sunny disposition. Although he worked regularly as an actor, Robinson was best known for his tap-dance routines. He pioneered a new form of tap, shifting from a flat-footed style to a light, swinging style that focused on elegant footwork.

Robinson’s fame withstood the decline of African-American revues. He starred in 14 Hollywood motion pictures, many of them musicals, and played multiple roles opposite the child star Shirley Temple. His film credits include Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, The Little Colonel and Stormy Weather, co-starring Lena Horne and Cab Calloway. Despite his fame, Robinson was not able to transcend the narrow range of stereotypical roles written for black actors at the time. By accepting these roles, Robinson was able to maintain steady employment and remain in the public eye. In 1939, at the age of 61, he performed in The Hot Mikado, a jazz-inspired interpretation of Gilbert and Sullivan’s operetta. Robinson celebrated his 61st birthday publicly by dancing down 61 blocks of Broadway.

Robinson was married three times. His 1907 marriage to Lena Chase ended in 1922. He married his second wife, Fannie S. Clay, in 1922. Clay served as her husband’s manager and assisted him in founding the Negro Actors Guild of America, which advocated for the rights of African-American performers. Clay and Robinson divorced in 1943. In 1944, he married Elaine Plaines. Robinson and Plaines were together until Robinson’s death in 1949.

Bill Robinson was involved in baseball as well as theater. In 1936, He cofounded the New York Black Yankees team, based in Harlem, with financier James Semler. The team was a part of the Negro National League until 1948, when Major League Baseball first integrated racially.

Despite earning millions during his lifetime, Robinson died poor in 1949, at the age of 71. Much of his wealth went to charities in Harlem and beyond before his death. Robinson’s funeral, arranged by longtime friend and television host Ed Sullivan, was held at the 369th Infantry Regiment Armory and attended by thousands, including many stars from the entertainment industry. A eulogy by Adam Clayton Powell Sr. (father of Congressman Adam Clayton Powell Jr.) was broadcast over the radio. Robinson was buried in the Cemetery of the Evergreens in Brooklyn, New York.

Robinson remained a well-known figure after his death, particularly in dance circles. In 1989, a joint congressional resolution established National Tap Dance Day on May 25, Robinson’s birthday. Additionally, a public park in Harlem bears Robinson’s name—a way of honoring his charity contributions and participation in the neighborhood’s civic life.

Sources: YouTube and biography.com

@thefullbronte “everything’s copacetic” -Clete Purcell

Martin Luther King, Jr.

- was opposed to violence in a time where systemic racism actually existed

- preached love and understanding even when his opponents hated him

- condemned violence, no matter who incited it

- brought change using peaceful protests and civil discourse

- wanted people to be judged by the content of their character, not by the color of their skin

- showed his face

He was a hero


ANTIFA

- shows up in groups and hides their faces

- incites violence almost everywhere they show up

- seeks to bring change by shutting down free speech, labeling anyone who disagrees with them a racist, and punching people

- praises violence on one side

- gets their way using bully tactics and mob mentality

- wants people to be judged by the color of their skin, not the content of their character

They are a group of thugs

I updated my store with prints of TV Shows & movies!

You can get them single or in packs of four postcards. Are also available in A4 and A3 size.Come on, cheer up! HERE

10

Hump Day Hunks For A Cause!

Ben Foden Took The ALS Ice Bucket Challenge. Dylan Hartley And Luther Burrell Provided The Muscle For Lift Off and Landing!

Way To Go, Bros!

So I just gonna make this crappy little post just saying some stuff from More than Meets the eye 43……the sitcom one….ok so this issue was great like just look at the holoavatars if you haven’t seen them yet theyre all great im just pointing some moments i really liked….such as 

Luther (Idris Elba) Nightbeat, Young Guy Rodimus and Best Girl Nautica speaking of Nautica

She tried to tickle Megatron.

He has a cane Im sorry I know he ditches it right away but still I love it.

Also Cyclonus looking classy as all hell bringing it home with the driest of humor.

Also on a side note the more and more i see of swerves holomater the more i want to cosplay it

It is well to remember that the majority of men have never invented the device of beating children into submission. Some of the American Plains Indian tribes were (as I had an opportunity to relate and to discuss twenty years ago) profoundly shocked when they first saw white people beat their children. In their bewilderment they could only explain such behavior as part of an over-all missionary scheme–an explanation also supported by the white people’s method of letting their babies cry themselves blue in the face. It all must mean, so they thought, a well-calculated wish to impress white children with the idea that this world is not a good place to linger in, and that it is better to look to the other world where perfect happiness is to be had at the price of having sacrificed this world. This is an ideological interpretation, and a shrewd one: it interprets a single typical act not on the basis of its being a possible cause of a limited effect, but as part of a world view. And indeed, we now beat our children less, but we are still harrying them through this imperfect world, not so much to get them to the next one as to make them hurry from one good moment to better ones, to climb, improve, advance, progress. It takes a particular view of man’s place on this earth, and of the place of childhood within man’s total scheme, to invent devices for terrifying children into submission, either by magic, or by mental and physical terror. When these terrors are associated with collective and ritual observances, they can be assumed to contain some inner corrective which keeps the individual child from facing life all by himself; they may even offer some compensation of belongingness and identification. Special concepts of property (including the idea that a man can ruin his own property if he wishes) underlie the idea that it is entirely up to the discretion of an individual father when he should raise the morality of his children by beating their bodies. It is clear that the concept of children as property opens the door to those misalliances of impulsivity and compulsivity, of arbitrariness and moral logic, of brutality and haughtiness, which make men cruder and more licentious than creatures not fired with the divine spark. The device of beating children down–by superior force, by contrived logic, or by vicious sweetness–makes it unnecessary for the adult to become adult. He need not develop that true inner superiority which is naturally persuasive. Instead, he is authorized to remain significantly inconsistent and arbitrary, or in other words, childish, while beating into the child the desirability of growing up. The child, forced out of fear to pretend that he is better when seen than when unseen, is left to anticipate the day when he will have the brute power to make others more moral than he ever intends to be himself.
—  Erik Erikson, Young Man Luther (1958), 69-70

If Malcolm X had died at 25 he would have been a street hustler named Detroit Red.

If Martin Luther King died at 25 he would have been a local Baptist minister who had not yet arrived on the national scene.

And if I would have died at 25 I would have been known as a mere trumpet player and struggling composer.

Just a sliver of my life potential

- Quincy Jones on Tupac Shakur’s death at only 25 years of age.

10

NBF CELEBRATES MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. DAY!

With a look back at some of the National Book Award Honored books that celebrate the heroes and heroines of the Civil Rights movement. 

(From top, left to right)

1. Ralph EllisonArnold Rampersad (2007 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction)

2. Claudette Colvin: Twice Toward JusticePhillip Hoose (2009, National Book Award Winner, Young People’s Literature)

3. Head Off & SplitNikki Finney (2011 National Book Award Winner, Poetry)

4. Lost Prophet: The Life and Times of Bayard Rustin, John D'Emilio (2003 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction)

5.  W.E.B. Du Bois: Biography of a Race: 1868-1919, David Levering Lewis (1993 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction)

6. One with Others, C.D. Wright (2010 National Book Award Finalist, Poetry)

7. Malcom X: A Life of ReinventionManning Marable (2011 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction)

8. Carver: A Life in PoemsMarilyn Nelson (2001 National Book Award Finalist, Young People’s Literature)

9. The Port Chicago 50: Disaster, Mutiny, and the Fight for Civil RightsSteve Sheinkin (2014 National Book Award Finalist, Young People’s Literature)

10. At Canaan’s Edge: America in the King Years, 1965-1968Taylor Branch (2006 National Book Award Finalist, Nonfiction)