lunar roving

Whoa guys, I just got a wild idea. I’m just putting this out there…

what if it can fold up to fit inside?

WHOA LOOK AT THAT IT CAN FOLD IN HALF TO FIT INSIDE THE LM AND THEN ALL THEY HAVE TO DO WHEN THEY GET TO THE MOON IS PULL THIS THING TO UNFOLD IT AND GET IT OUT AT THE SAME TIME THIS IS SO CLEVER I’M  S H O O K 

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A brief tour of the night sky.

So last night I glanced out of bedroom window before going bed when I saw the moon rising and Jupiter shining above it.
Not to mention the spectacular array of stars elsewhere.
The street lights down my street get mostly shut down after 1am, which leads to a lot less light pollution and a lot more visible stars.

So I decided to rush out and take some pictures and I have provided close ups of some of night sky objects.

[1] The largest planet in our solar system, Jupiter!
Either side of it are its 4 Galilean moons!
[2] The moon, my favourite picture taken from the moon besides Earth rise is this one taken on the Apollo 17 mission (see bottom).
The magnificent feeling of desolation when looking at this picture only to spot a single astronaut preparing the lunar roving vehicle, amazing!
[3] The super red giant Betelgeuse!
This star is on the very edge of going supernova!
If so, then the remnants would be visible day & night for up to 2 weeks.
A second “sun” in our skies!
[4] The appropriately named flame nebula sits on the far left of Orion’s belt.
[5] The sword of Orion.
Containing the magnificent Orion nebula.

Commander David Scott (photograph), Jim Irwin seen with the Lunar Roving Vehicle on the first lunar surface EVA of Apollo 15 during NASA’s fourth manned lunar landing, July 31st 1971.

Eugene A. Cernan, Commander, Apollo 17 salutes the flag on the lunar surface during extravehicular activity (EVA) on NASA’s final lunar landing mission. The Lunar Module “Challenger” is in the left background behind the flag and the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) also in background behind him. While astronauts Cernan and Schmitt descended in the Challenger to explore the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, Command Module pilot, remained with the Command/Service Module (CSM) “America” in lunar-orbit.

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An Apollo 16 astronaut driving a battery-powered Lunar Roving Vehicle on the surface of the Moon in 1972.

(13 Dec. 1972) — The Apollo 17 Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV) is photographed near a large lunar boulder during the third Apollo 17 extravehicular activity (EVA) at the Taurus-Littrow landing site. About half of the boulder is captured in this scene, photographed by astronaut Eugene A. Cernan, mission commander. While astronauts Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt descended in the Lunar Module (LM) “Challenger” to explore the lunar surface, astronaut Ronald E. Evans, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit.

(12 Dec. 1972) — Wide-angle view of the Apollo 17 Taurus-Littrow lunar landing site. To the left in the background is the Lunar Module. To the right in the background is the Lunar Roving vehicle. An Apollo 17 crewmember is photographed between the two points. The shadow of the astronaut taking the photograph can be seen in the right foreground.